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Username Post: nitrous info / answers        (Topic#49752)
Anonymous 

11-13-03 03:18 AM - Post#335643    

Ok I want to ask you guys about Nitrous. It scares the heck out of me but I want to gain that little extra edge when I take my car to the track. So I wanted to ask somewhere I would get honest answers and not get picked on for my ignorance.
So here comes the questions

How safe is it?
What special mountings and hardware is required?
Where should I mount the bottle for the safest location?
Where should the lines be run for saftey?
What sort of trigger switch is best used?
How much is suggested for a stock bore and stroke 350 with a mild cam and intake setup with about 9:1?
How much is suggested for a 355 with a large cam headers and good heads with about 10:1?
How much engine wear and tear is added when using it?
How often can it be used?
Where would I get the bottle refilled?
Is there any special things I should do to the engine before using it?
Any one have any links to site with more details about it?
I was thinking I would like to run a 75-100hp shot on both of my camaros for that extra little bit at the track.
Is this too much or too little?

I know these are probably dumb questions but I really don't know these things. I don't hang out with a big racing crowd and don't know anyone who has serisouly run NOS on their rides.

So please help out a newbie and shed a little light on this subject. If you must you can pick on me as long as you help me as well.



 




JungleJim 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1463
JungleJim
Loc: Cajun Country, Louisiana
Reg: 07-30-00
Re: Probably a dumb question
11-13-03 06:37 AM - Post#335645    
    In response to

Quote:

from Nitrous Express

Most Commonly Asked Questions -
Q. How does nitrous oxide create more horsepower?
A. Nitrous oxide provides the oxygen that allows an engine to burn more fuel, more burned fuel equals more power.


Q. What is the difference between a wet and a dry system?
A. A "Wet" system introduces a homogenous mixture of nitrous and atomized fuel into the incoming air stream, thus providing a perfect air/fuel ratio for each.


Q. Can I still run my car all-motor with nitrous installed?
A. Of course, the nitrous system only affects performance when it is being used.


Q. How can nitrous blow my engine up?
A. Nitrous in and of itself cannot "blowup" an engine. Nitrous kits of poor design, poor quality, and improper air/fuel ratios damage engines.


Q. What is nitrous backfire?
A. Nitrous backfires can be caused by two situations. 1. A nitrous system that is two rich or a system that atomizes the fuel poorly, thus causing pooling or puddling of fuel in the intake manifold. 2. A system that is operated too lean.


Q. What is meant by 30, 50, 100, 150, and 200 shots?
A. "Shot" is commonly used slang in the nitrous community to refer to the amount of horsepower increase provided by the nitrous system.


Q. How long can I squeeze nitrous in my engine?
A. With an NX system the only limitation is the capacity of the N2O bottle or the RPM limit of the engine.


Q. When is the best time to use nitrous?
A. When you want to go fast.


Q. How can a nitrous system be activated (a "happy button," automatically, or what)?
A. All NX systems come standard with wide-open throttle switches, however we offer an electronic TPS switch as well as a push button.


Q. What is the safest way to configure nitrous activation?
A. The only safe way is to use a wide open throttle switch, however you may configure any number of ways to "trip" the system but all must be used in conjunction with some type of wide open throttle switch.


Q. Is a bottle heater good?
A. A quality bottle heater is essential to proper nitrous system performance.


Q. Can I vary the amount of nitrous injected when I want?
A. Yes, by utilizing NX's digital progressive controller, the "Maximizer". This devise allows the user to precisely control the amount of nitrous delivered to his engine from the comfort of the drivers seat.


Q. Can I install a nitrous system on my car if there is no kit available?
A. NX has a system for every car manufactured in the world today.


Q. How much of a horsepower increase can I expect from a nitrous system?
A. All NX systems make within 2% of their claimed horsepower, if you jet the system for 50 horsepower then you can expect no less than 49 horsepower, but usually a few more than the rated amount.


Q. How long will a bottle of nitrous last?
A. That depends on the level of power being produced. The formula for calculating your nitrous usage is: 0.8 lbs N2O X 10 seconds = 100 horsepower. I.E. If your system is jetted for 100 horsepower it will use 0.8 lbs of nitrous for every 10 seconds of usage.


Q. How much does it cost to get nitrous refills?
A. The cost of nitrous oxide varies with the region of the country, however a general estimate would be between $3.50-5.00 per pound.


Q. Are there nitrous systems available for late model imports?
A. NX makes a system for every car manufactured today.


Q. What comes with a nitrous kit?
A. Most NX systems come complete with a 10 lb nitrous bottle, stainless steel bottle brackets, 16 ft aircraft style supply line, N2O filter, lifetime warranty nitrous and fuel solenoids with mounts, all standard jet settings, an NX patented Shark nozzle (nozzles), or a patented carbureted plate, wide open throttle switch, a complete installation pack that includes all bolts, nuts, washers, wire, wire terminals, lighted arming switch, and complete instructions with pictures.


Q. Will I need anything else to install the kit properly?

A. To complete the installation a Gen-X package should be ordered with the system. This includes the bottle heater, liquid filled nitrous pressure gauge, low fuel pressure safety switch, and a external bottle vent fitting and plumbing kit.


Q. Can I hide my nitrous system from a novice tuner?
A. Yes, it is quite easy to hide an NX system from the casual observer.


Q. Can I use nitrous on my turbo or supercharged vehicle?
A. Yes, NX specializes in turbo-supercharged nitrous applications.


Q. What are some general rules for creating the most horsepower without damaging anything?
A. Generally speaking the amount of power that can be created with nitrous is almost limitless. To avoid a catastrophe, the internal components of the engine must match the amount of power that is going to be generated. The use of proper air/fuel ratios is essential and the quality of the nitrous system is paramount.


Q. Is a nitrous system worth the money (horsepower per dollar wise)?
A. No other devise in the world offers such a bargain as nitrous oxide.


Q. Why doesn't everyone use nitrous?
A. Nitrous is not for everyone, some people prefer turbos, some like blowers, and others feel it is cheating to use nitrous.


Q. Why does nitrous have such a scary reputation?
A. There has been some very shoddy nitrous "kits" sold to unsuspecting customers over the last 20 years; this along with the abuse nitrous has suffered from "idiots" who damage their own engines.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Technical Questions -

Q. How does a nitrous system operate on a fuel-injected vehicle?
A. The NX system is a complete stand-alone air/fuel delivery system that augments the standard factory EFI unit. It provides additional fuel and oxygen to the cylinders via the patented "Shark" nozzle mounted in the intake tract to provide additional horsepower.


Q. How does a nitrous system operate on a carbureted vehicle?
A. The most common method of boosting power on carbureted applications is the use of a "plate" sandwiched between the carb and the intake manifold. This plate contains orificed tubes that deliver the nitrous/fuel mixture in precise ratios.


Q. How easy is it to install a basic wet nitrous system?
A. The NX "Stage One" EFI System is very straightforward. It requires no engine disassembly, no fuel system modifications or timing retards. Simply install the "Shark" nozzle in the intake tract approximately 2-6 inches in front of the throttle body and connect the fuel solenoid to the high-pressure side of the injection rail and your ready to go.


Q. Purge valves look cool, should I get one for my nitrous vehicle?
A. A purge valve is a valuable tool for increased nitrous performance. It allows the user to "Purge" all gaseous nitrous from the bottle supply line prior to using the system. This allows for a harder "Hit" from the system thus increasing performance.


Q. [b\ What safety features come with a nitrous system?
A. There are several safety related devises that can be used with a modern nitrous system. The first, and most important is the wide-open throttle switch. This prevents the user from accidentally engaging the system. A special high flow nitrous filter is furnished with every NX street system. All hoses are aircraft quality stainless steel braided, Teflon. All NX systems come with the highest quality, made in the USA, stainless steel solenoids.


Q. How does the solenoid know when to open and release the nitrous oxide?
A. All NX systems are furnished with Wide Open Throttle switches. This switch signals the solenoids to open when the motor reaches wide-open throttle.


Q. What are the differences between a dry nozzle and a wet nozzle?
A. The "dry" system uses the factory fuel injection to enrich the nitrous introduced into the engine. The flaw with this technology is that no matter how much nitrous arrives at a certain intake port it always gets the same preset amount of fuel, or if a fuel injector becomes clogged engine damage will result. The "Wet" technology introduces a precise amount of fuel and nitrous through a high tech mixing nozzle that atomizes the fuel to microscopic proportions. This allows every cylinder to receive a precise, homogenous mixture of fuel and nitrous, thus insuring a safe, powerful increase.


Q. What is nitrous backfire?
A. Nitrous backfires can be caused by two situations. 1. A nitrous system that is two rich or a system that atomizes the fuel poorly, thus causing pooling or puddling of fuel in the intake manifold. 2. A system that is operated too lean.


Q. Should I use an aftermarket ignition with nitrous?
A. All NX Street or Stage One systems are designed to operate with stock ignition; however any upgrade in the stock ignition is a definite plus.


Q. Should I change my ignition system in any way (timing, plugs, etc.)?
A. All NX Stage One or Street systems are designed to operate with no timing retard. Spark plugs should be changed to non-platinum style, 1 to 2 steps colder than stock.


Q. Will a bigger bottle give you more horsepower?
A. No; however a larger capacity bottle will provide a more stable bottle pressure resulting in a lower E.T. and a higher M.P.H.


Q. What is the difference between a 1 stage and a 2 stage system?
A. A single stage system refers to one single nitrous system; a 2 stage or dual stage incorporates two nitrous systems on one application. This allows a car to launch with the maximum horsepower possible, with the traction available, then add more power down track as the car can handle it.


Q. Why does my engine need more fuel while on the bottle?
A. The fuel, or gasoline, is the source of the additional horsepower. The nitrous' job is to provide the oxygen to allow the fuel to be burned.


Q. How can my engine get more fuel while on the bottle?
A. All NX systems add additional fuel during nitrous usage by injecting it directly with the nitrous through their patented "Shark" nozzle. This method assures 100% atomization of the fuel and accurate air/fuel ratios.


Q. What is the safest way to configure nitrous activation?
A. The only safe way is to use a wide open throttle switch, however you may configure any number of ways to "trip" the system but all must be used in conjunction with some type of wide open throttle switch.


Q. Is a bottle heater good?
A. A quality bottle heater is essential to proper nitrous system performance.


Q. How much pressure should be in my bottle?
A. All NX systems are designed to operate between 900-1050 PSI.


Q. What accessories are available for a nitrous system?
A. NX has over one hundred accessory part numbers, ranging from digital progressive controllers to space age bottle insulating jackets.


Q. Can I vary the amount of nitrous injected when I want?
A. Yes, by utilizing NX's digital progressive controller, the "Maximizer". This devise allows the user to precisely control the amount of nitrous delivered to his engine from the comfort of the drivers seat.


Q. Do you have an installation manual online so I can see if I want to install a kit on my car?
A. Yes.


Q. How does a nitrous system know when I'm at wide-open throttle?
A. All NX systems are equipped with wide-open throttle micro switches, or an optional electronic TPS switch is available.


Q. How much of a horsepower increase can I expect from a nitrous system?
A. All NX systems make within 2% of their claimed horsepower, if you jet the system for 50 horsepower then you can expect no less than 49 horsepower, but usually a few more than the rated amount.


Q. Are there any dangers or things to stay away from while using nitrous?
A. Of course, NX recommends that no more than an additional 20 horsepower per cylinder be used on a stock engine, with a stock fuel pump. Always be sure you are using clean, uncontaminated nitrous. Also, be sure you have the highest octane fuel available, I.E. 93 octane premium for, stock compression, street cars and the highest motor octane fuel available for competition type vehicles.


Q. Is there a trade off for engine reliability and power produced with nitrous?
A. When used according to factory recommendations, shortened engine life should not be a concern.



Q. Can you feed an engine too much nitrous even if you keep the air/fuel ratio the same?
A. Yes, if the mechanical limits of the engine are exceeded catastrophic engine failure will result.


Q. Are there nitrous systems available for late model imports?
A. NX makes a system for every car manufactured today.


Q. What comes with a nitrous kit?
A. Most NX systems come complete with a 10 lb nitrous bottle, stainless steel bottle brackets, 16 ft aircraft style supply line, N2O filter, lifetime warranty nitrous and fuel solenoids with mounts, all standard jet settings, an NX patented Shark nozzle (nozzles), or a patented carbureted plate, wide open throttle switch, a complete installation pack that includes all bolts, nuts, washers, wire, wire terminals, lighted arming switch, and complete instructions with pictures.



Q. Can I use a nitrous kit on an automatic?
A. Yes, the preferred application, for nitrous, is an automatic transmission equipped vehicle.


Q. Can you powerbrake an automatic with nitrous without it blowing up?
A. The answer is a qualified, yes. If your brakes can hold your engine, at full throttle, with the nitrous on, the answer is yes, but it is doubtful this would be possible.


Q. Can a nitrous system be set up to shut down once the brake is depressed?
A. Yes, if the user wires his system with a double throw-double pole relay placed between the arming switch and the wide open throttle switch that is activated when the brakes are applied.


Q. Can nitrous systems be used with aftermarket chips or ECU's?
A. Yes, however close attention must be paid to excessive timing advance that could cause detonation.


Q. Are drag racing launch techniques any different with nitrous for AT or MT's?
A. Depending on the traction available the launch techniques are the same, however with the increased torque and horsepower generated by nitrous usage, sometimes is necessary to delay the nitrous onset for a brief period.


Q. How high must the RPM's before activating nitrous?
A. The RPM level is not as important as is the motors ability to rev freely when the nitrous is engaged, I.E. If the vehicle is in low gear, nitrous can be engaged at any time, but if the vehicle is in a higher gear moving at a slow speed when the nitrous is engaged the engine will detonate and damage will occur.


Q. Does nitrous increase cylinder temperatures and combustion chamber pressure?
A. No, cylinder temperatures should stay the same when the correct nitrous air/fuel ratio is used. Yes, increased cylinder pressure equals increased horsepower.


Q. Can I use nitrous on my high compression engine?
A. Yes, but the proper octane fuel must be used to prevent detonation.



Q. What are some general rules for creating the most horsepower without damaging anything?
A. Generally speaking the amount of power that can be created with nitrous is almost limitless. To avoid a catastrophe, the internal components of the engine must match the amount of power that is going to be generated. The use of proper air/fuel ratios is essential and the quality of the nitrous system is paramount.


Q. What if the pressure is too high, should I cool it?
A. If the bottle pressure is in excess of 1100 PSI the bottle should be cooled using a wet towel or chamois.


Q. Is there any harm that can be done to my engine if I use nitrous while the bottle pressure is too high?
A. Yes, the nitrous system will run "lean" if the nitrous pressure is high beyond specification. This could cause severe engine damage.


Q. Where should I run the main nitrous feed line?
A. The feed line can be run either under the car of through the passenger compartment. Care should be taken to route the line away from any voltage points or moving suspension parts.


Q. Where should I install my bottle?
A. The ideal place to mount the bottle is in the trunk; however if your car is a hatchback it is permissible to mount it in the passenger compartment if an external pressure relief vent is properly installed on the bottle.


Q. What if my bottle leaks while I'm driving, could I get busted for OWI?
A. To become, "intoxicated", the nitrous leak would have to be severe and noticeable. No excuses to be found here!


Q. Is a nitrous system worth the money (horsepower per dollar wise)?
A. No other devise in the world offers such a bargain as nitrous oxide.





Laissez Le Bon Temp Rouler' Cha!
Louisiana Racer's click here
My Chevelle


 
grumpyvette 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator -- Performance Subject Matter Expert --
Posts: 17207
grumpyvette
Age: 70
Loc: FLORIDA USA
Reg: 03-16-01
Re: Probably a dumb question
11-13-03 06:45 AM - Post#335646    
    In response to JungleJim

JungleJim
thanks nice post!

heres more info
A Word On Fuel Pressure
Fuel pressure regulators should be set to a flowing fuel pressure or false readings may be obtained. To set flowing fuel pressure on the vehicle, use a test jet flowing fuel into a container to find what size test jet should be used when flowing multi-nozzle systems. Use the following formula:
Jet size2 x number of nozzles (per fuel solenoid).
Then take the square root of this number.
This is the Test Jet in thousands of an inch.

Example:
Eight #32 Fuel Jets are equal to one 91 Jet
32 x 32 = 1024 x 8 Jets = 8192
The square root of this number is 90.509...

This procedure cannot guarantee a steady fuel pressure during a run. As G-forces and cell placement will affect the fuel pump's load. Which cannot be easily duplicated in the pits.

NOTE: Systems using multiple stages and/or H.P. levels over 400 H.P. will benefit from a super Hi-Flo bottle valve (PT.# 16139) and/or a large bottle (15 or 20lb.) Due to a lower pressure drop during a run. This valve also allows pressure readings with a closed bottle valve; via one of the valve's built-in direct reading ports, one 1/8 NPT and one 1/4 NPT.
* A 15 pound bottle equipped with a super Hi-Flo valve works great on maximum effort systems (with a minimum effect on weight).

Q: Can I simply bolt a nitrous kit onto my stock engine?
A: Yes. NOS manufactures systems for virtually any stock engine application. The key is to choose the correct kit for a given application; i.e., 4 cyl. engines normally allow an extra 40-60 HP, 6 cyl. engines usually work great between 75-100 extra HP, small block V8's (302/350/400cid) can typically accept up to 140 extra HP, and big block V8's (427-454) might accept from 125-200 extra HP. These suggested ranges provide maximum reliability from most stock engines using cast pistons and cast crank with few or no engine modifications.

Q: What are some of the general rules for even higher HP gains?
A: Generally, forged aluminum pistons are one of best modifications you can make. Retard ignition timing by 4-8 degrees (1 to 1-1/2 degrees timing retard per 50 HP gain). In many cases a higher flowing fuel pump may be necessary. Higher octane (100+) racing type fuel may be required as well as spark plugs 1 to 2 heat ranges colder than normal with gaps closed to .025"-.030". For gains over 250 HP, other important modifications could be necessary in addition to those mentioned above. These special modifications may include a forged crankshaft, a high quality race type connecting rods, a high output fuel pump dedicated to feeding the additional fuel demands of the nitrous system, and a racing fuel with high specific gravity and an octane rating of 110 or more. For more specific information about your application, please contact the NOS technical dept.

Q: How does nitrous work?
A: Nitrous oxide is made up of 2 parts nitrogen and one part oxygen (36% oxygen by weight). During the combustion process in an engine, at about 572 degrees F, nitrous breaks down and releases oxygen. This extra oxygen creates additional power by allowing more fuel to be burned. Nitrogen acts to buffer, or dampen the increased cylinder pressures helping to control the combustion process. Nitrous also has a tremendous "intercooling" effect by reducing intake charge temperatures by 60 to 75 degrees F.

Q: What kind of testing or research is performed on NOS products?
A: NOS maintains a complete research and development center including computerized dynamometer equipment as well as a nitrous/fuel flow testing facility. In addition, NOS is actively involved in many aspects of racing; working closely with many top name racers to develop the most powerful and reliable nitrous systems in the world.

Q: How much performance improvement can I expect with a nitrous system?
A: For many applications an improvement from 1 to 3 full seconds and 10 to 15 MPH in the quarter mile can be expected. Factors such as engine size, tires, jetting, gearing, etc. will affect the final results.

Q: How long will the bottle last?
A: This largely depends on the type of nitrous kit and jetting used. For example, a 125 HP Power Shot kit with a standard 10 lb. capacity bottle will usually offer up to 7 to 10 full quarter-mile passes. For power levels of 250 HP, 3 to 5 full quarter-mile passes may be expected. If nitrous is only used in 2nd and 3rd gears, the number of runs will be more.

Q: How long can I hold the nitrous button down?
A: It is possible to hold the button down until the bottle is empty. However 15 continuous seconds at a time, or less, is recommended.

Q: When is the best time to use nitrous?
A: At wide open throttle only (unless a progressive controller is used). Due to the tremendous amount of increased torque, you will generally find best results, traction permitting, at early activation. Nitrous can be safely applied above 2,500 RPM under full throttle conditions.

Q: Does NOS manufacture 50-state legal nitrous systems?
A: Yes. In fact, NOS has several EO numbers for various kits such as the 5.0L Mustang and 305/350 GM V8's, etc. In addition, there is no need to remove any smog equipment when installing an NOS system. For more information call the NOS tech line.

Q: Will I have to re-jet my carburetor on my car when adding nitrous?
A: No! The NOS system is independent of your carburetor and injects its own mixture of fuel and nitrous.

Q: Is nitrous oxide flammable?
A: No. Nitrous Oxide by itself is non-flammable. However, the oxygen present in nitrous oxide causes combustion of fuel to take place more rapidly.

Q: Will nitrous oxide cause detonation?
A: Not directly. Detonation is the result of too little fuel present during combustion (lean) or too low of an octane of fuel. Too much ignition advance also causes detonation. In general, most of our kits engineered for stock type engines will work well with premium type fuels and minimal decreases of ignition timing. In racing application where higher compression ratios are used, resulting in higher cylinder pressures, a higher fuel octane must be used as well as more ignition retard.

Q: Where can I get my bottle refilled?
A: Simply call 1-800-99-REFILL for the location of the nearest NOS dealer with refilling capabilities, or check immediately for the most up-to-date Authorized NOS Refill Station Dealers List online.

Q: Is there any performance increase in using medical grade nitrous oxide?
A: None! NOS recommends and sells only the automotive grade, called Ny-trous Plus. Ny-trous Plus contains a minimal amount of sulfur dioxide (100 ppm) as a deterrent to substance abuse. The additive does not affect performance.

Q: Is it a good idea to use an aftermarket computer chip in conjunction with an NOS System?
A: Only if the chip has been designed specifically for use with nitrous oxide. Most aftermarket chips use more aggressive timing advance curves to create more power. This can lead to possible detonation. You may wish to check with the manufacturer of the chip before using it. The top manufacturers, such as Hypertech do make special chips for use with nitrous.

Q: How long does it generally take to install an NOS kit?
A: The majority of NOS kits can be installed using common hand tools in approximately 4 to 6 hours. NOS instruction manuals are by far the best in the industry; and include specific installation drawings, wiring diagrams, and bottle mounting procedures as well as performance tips and a thorough trouble shooting guide.

Q: Which type of manifold is better suited for a plate injector type of nitrous system, single or dual plane manifold?
A: As long as the manifold doesn't interfere with the spray pattern of the bars, either will work fine in most cases. The distribution is better with a single plane at high RPM. If your goal is to increase power by more than 150 HP, the single plane manifold is better.

Q: Does nitrous oxide raise cylinder pressure and temperatures?
A: Yes. Due to the ability to burn more fuel, this is exactly why nitrous makes so much power.

Q: Are there any benefits to chilling the nitrous bottle?
A: No. Chilling the bottle lowers the pressure dramatically and will also lower the flow rate of the nitrous causing a fuel rich condition and reducing power. On cold evenings you might run on the rich side. For optimal running conditions, keep bottle pressure at approximately 900-950 psi. NOS has a nitrous pressure gauge that allows you to monitor this. If you live or operate a nitrous system in colder temperatures, it may also be a good idea to purchase a bottle heater kit, part #14164. Generally, ambient temperatures of 80-90 degrees F will allow for best power potential of NOS kits.

Q: Are there benefits to using nitrous with turbo or super-charger applications?
A: Absolutely! In turbo applications, turbo lag is completely eliminated with the addition of a nitrous system. In addition, both turbo and superchargers compress the incoming air, thus heating it. With the injection of nitrous, a tremendous intercooling effect reduces intake charge temperatures by 75 degrees or more. Boost is usually increased as well, adding to even more power.

Q: How complete is an NOS kit?
A: NOS prides itself on offering the most complete systems on the market today. They include virtually every component that may be needed for a complete installation; parts such as extra long carburetor studs, gaskets, pipe tap, fuel hose, brackets, filters, fittings, hardware, wiring, 10 lb. bottle with Hi-Flo valve, comprehensive instruction manual, and all other major components are standard in every NOS kit.

Q: What is the difference between a standard and an NOS Hi-Flo bottle valve?
A: The orifice of the Hi-Flo valve is much larger than the standard valve allowing for a larger flow of nitrous. With a small orifice valve a pressure drop could occur when nitrous flow is high; causing surging or inadequate nitrous flow. The NOS Hi-Flo valve eliminates this problem. NOS Hi-Flo valves are standard in all NOS kits.

Q: What affect does nitrous have on an engine with considerable miles on it?
A: This depends largely on the actual condition of the engine components. Any performance modification to an engine that is worn out or poorly tuned will have detrimental effects. However, an engine in good condition, with good ring and head gasket sealing, should be able to use nitrous without any abnormal wear.

Q: Will the use of nitrous oxide affect the catalytic converter?
A: No. The increase in oxygen present in the exhaust may actually increase the efficiency of the converter. Since the use of nitrous is normally limited to 10-20 seconds of continuous use, there usually are no appreciable effects. Temperatures are typically well within acceptable standards.

Q: Will the percentage of performance increase be the same in a highly modified engine compared to a stock engine when using the same NOS kit and jetting?
A: Not really. In most cases the percentage of increase is greater from a stock engine because it is not as efficient as the modified engine in a normal non-nitrous mode. However, since the effects of nitrous oxide magnify the output of any engine, the total power output will be much higher in the modified engine.

Q: Can high compression engines utilize nitrous oxide?
A: Absolutely. High or low compression ratios can work quite suitably with nitrous oxide provided the proper balance of nitrous and fuel enrichment is maintained. NOS kits are used in applications from relatively low compression stock type motors to Pro-Modifieds, which often exceed 15 to 1. Generally, the higher the compression ratio, the more ignition retard, as well as higher octane fuel, is required. For more specific information talk to one of our technicians.

Q: Can service station fuel be used for street/strip nitrous oxide applications?
A: Yes. Use of a premium type leaded or unleaded fuel of 92, or greater, octane is recommended for most applications. Many NOS systems are designed for use with service station pump gas. However, when higher compression or higher horsepower levels are used, a racing fuel of 100 octane, or more, must be used.

Q: What type of cam is best suited for use with nitrous oxide?
A: Generally, cams that have less exhaust overlap and more exhaust duration. However, it is best to choose a cam tailored to normal use (when nitrous is not activated) since 99% of most vehicle operations is not at full throttle. There are special cam grinds available for nitrous competition which have more aggressive exhaust profile ramping, etc. Since cam selection depends largely on vehicle weight, gearing, etc., it is best to stick to cam manufacturers' recommendations for your particular goal.

Q: Are NOS kits applicable on late model EFI cars?
A: Yes. In fact NOS has by far the most comprehensive selection of nitrous kits available for these cars. Call for your specific application if you do not see it listed.

Q: What type of nitrous system is better; a plate injection system or a direct port injection system?
A: The advantages of a plate system are ease of installation and removal, ability to transfer easily to another vehicle, ability to change jetting combinations quickly, and in most cases, provide you with all the extra HP you will ever need (75 to 350 more HP). In some cases, such as in-line type engines with long runners, a direct port type system is advisable for maximizing distribution. Also, where more than 350 HP is needed, our direct port Fogger systems will provide the ultimate in distribution and power (up to 500+ HP). Direct port injection is also desirable when the system is hidden under the manifold.

Q: Should I modify my fuel system to use nitrous oxide?
A: Most stock fuel pumps will work adequately for smaller nitrous applications. It is important to check to see if your pump can flow enough fuel to your existing fuel system (whether carburetor or fuel injected), as well as being able to supply the additional fuel required by the nitrous kit under full throttle conditions. It may be a good idea to dedicate a separate fuel pump to the nitrous kit.

Q: Which is the best position to mount a nitrous bottle?
A: NOS bottles come with siphon tubes and, in order to maintain proper nitrous pickup, it is important to mount the bottle correctly. We recommend mounting the bottle at a 15 degree angle with the valve end higher than the bottom of the bottle. The valve end of the bottle should point to the front of the vehicle and the valve knob and label should face straight up.

Q: How important is it to use nitrous and fuel filters in a kit?
A: Some of the most important components of any nitrous system are nitrous and fuel filters. To keep contaminants from attacking the solenoid or plugging up a jet, NOS nitrous filters feature a special stainless steel mesh element from the aerospace industry.

Q: What are the advantages of using nitrous compared to other performance options?
A: The cost of many other performance options can put you in the poorhouse. Dollar for dollar, you can't buy more performance with less money than nitrous. With a nitrous system, performance and reliability can be had for a much more reasonable price while still retaining the advantage of a stock engine during normal driving. And, Nitrous offers tremendous gains in torque without having to rev the engine to excessive rpm's. These factors help your engine last longer than many other methods of boosting horsepower.

Q: Does NOS manufacture kits for motorcycles, water craft, or snowmobiles?
A: Absolutely. Call or write NOS to obtain our special catalog devoted specifically to these applications.

Q: What kind of pressures are components subject to in a typical nitrous kit?
A: Pressures often exceed 1,000 psi. This is why NOS uses only high pressure tested aircraft quality components like stainless steel braided Teflon lines throughout its system.

Q: How do I know how much nitrous is left in the bottle?
A: The most reliable method was is to weigh the bottle to determine how many pounds remain. When a bottle is near empty (about 20% or less nitrous remaining) a surging effect is normally felt.

Q: What is the function of the blow-off safety valve on the bottle?
A: It is very important not to overfill a bottle; i.e., a 10 lb. capacity bottle should not be filled with more than 10 lbs. of nitrous oxide by weight. Over-filling and/or too much heat can cause excessive bottle pressures forcing the safety seal to blow and releasing all the contents out of the bottle.

Q: Will I have to change my ignition system?
A: Most late model ignition systems are well suited for nitrous applications. In some higher HP cases, it may be advisable to look into a high quality high output ignition system.


CONTINUE READING



very good system

not quite as good, but still ok


IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!


 
RickWI 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 1669

Loc: Madison, WI
Reg: 10-08-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
11-14-03 07:30 AM - Post#335649    
    In response to

How safe is it?
It is safe if proper fuel mixtures are maintained.

What special mountings and hardware is required?
None, most hardware is included in the kits.

Where should I mount the bottle for the safest location?
The trunk is the most common. A blow down tube and bottle heater are highly recommended.

Where should the lines be run for saftey?
I prefer on inside of the framerail.

What sort of trigger switch is best used?
I like a WIDE open throttle switch combined with an RPM window switch and a Hobbs low pressure fuel switch. So the system is powered when the throttle is wide open and will flow nitrous if both the RPM range and fuel pressure are within proper specifications. This helps make it safe.

How much is suggested for a stock bore and stroke 350 with a mild cam and intake setup with about 9:1?
How much is suggested for a 355 with a large cam headers and good heads with about 10:1?
In both cases I see and run against a lot of stock bottome end cars running up to 150hp of nitrous. 75 to 100 is very reasonable.

How much engine wear and tear is added when using it?
Anytime you make wide open blasts it shortens the life of a motor somewhat. Exact number is impossible to say but the nitrous is used so infrequent overall that unless something bad happened like you detonated the hell out of it cause you didn't use the proper safety controls it would be minimum.

How often can it be used?
As much as your pocket book can afford to refill your bottle at about $4.00 per lb.
Where would I get the bottle refilled?
NOS has a website with fill stations.
Is there any special things I should do to the engine before using it?
Have it tuned properly, new plugs a step or two colder, new wires, cap rotor and module if applicable, setback timing, verification of proper fuel volume at the system designed pressure. If fuel volume at sytem designed pressure is not proper DO NOT RUN the nitrous, you will blow it up.

Any one have any links to site with more details about it?
I was thinking I would like to run a 75-100hp shot on both of my camaros for that extra little bit at the track.
Is this too much or too little?
Nitrous Express and NOS are two good ones and where alot of the above info looks to have been copied from.

Hope that helps

70 SS Camaro, Dart Aluminum SmBlk 454 CI, 125 MPH (on the motor) in the quarter and 18 MPG on Power Tour


 
onovakind67 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 1694
onovakind67
Loc: Fairfield, CA
Reg: 05-25-00
Re: nitrous info / answers
11-15-03 05:40 AM - Post#335650    
    In response to

I have a few questions:

One piece of information I don't see is the proper air/fuel ratio for a nitrous application. The phrase 'proper air/fuel ratio' appears several times, but no hard data accompanies it. If I have a 9.5:1 a/f ratio in my 100 shot being blown into my 350 hp small block with a n/a a/f ratio of 12.5:1 what will my wideband meter read at full throttle?

How much does the a/f ratio vary with bottle pressure? Bottle location and line length?

How does the introduction of large amounts of nitrous and fuel directly below the carburetor throttle plates affect the workings of the carburetor? What happens to intake manifold vacuum?





 
Doug_F 
Holley Subject Matter Expert
Posts: 4720
Doug_F
Loc: Bowling Green, KY
Reg: 08-20-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
11-15-03 04:48 PM - Post#335651    
    In response to onovakind67

Most nitrous kits are jetted very rich for factory jetting combos.

I am a personal believer in wideband A/F ratios vs anything else unless you are one of the few that can read plugs and can do that.
Personally I shoot for around a 11.5:1 on the spray and I normally shoot for 12.8 N/A. Many out of the box jettings will reduce the A/F to 10:1 or even richer. I can't afford to experiment on my own engine going leaner on the nitrous. Also remember when measuring in the collector that is an average. Might have some holes leaner and some richer.

Bottle pressure has a large effect on performance. Unless you live in Florida or where the temp never goes below 80-85, if you are at all serious, you MUST run a bottle heater to maintain 950 PSI.

When my 15 lb bottle gets below 8 lbs the performance drops way off. That is because even though the gauge shows 950 PSI, the flowing pressure will drop.

How about variances in jet flow? I've seen a lot on that and sometimes it ain't pretty.

Fuel flowing pressure is also a big thing a lot of people don't think means much when in fact it means a ton.

The fact that most kits are way rich with factory jetting is why a lot of people don't blow their engines because of many incorrect practices IMO.

Activating nitrous at low RPM is one of the worst things you can do also.


I do EFI 95%, but working with people that do a lot of nitrous with carbs shows the metering in the carb can do very funny things when the nitrous is activated, especially with a lot of nitrous.

It's also my opinion from working with nitrous with a lot of data acquisition is that there is nobody that truly understands what happens when nitrous is injected into an operating engine, specifically when it is a gas and liquid in the entire system and when and how the nitrogen disassociates from the N2O and what goes on in the combustion chamber. Fortunately is still works pretty good.

Doug
1972 Nova
6.0L LSx, 80mm BorgWarner, 4L80E
9.34@147


 
Anonymous 

Re: nitrous info / answers
11-25-03 08:08 AM - Post#335652    
    In response to RickWI

RickWI,
where do you get it filled around Madison?



 
grumpyvette 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator -- Performance Subject Matter Expert --
Posts: 17207
grumpyvette
Age: 70
Loc: FLORIDA USA
Reg: 03-16-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
11-27-03 07:45 AM - Post#335653    
    In response to

READ THIS CAREFULLY ,IT MAKES SEVERAL GOOD POINTS

http://victorylibrary.com/mopar/nitrous-tech-c.htm

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/42580/

http://www.racingarticles.com/article_racing-10.html

http://www.nightrider.com/biketech/nos01.htm




BUY THE BOOK
http://www.magnumforce.com/nitrous_universalsystems.asp

AND KEEP IN MIND,NITROUS REQUIRES A FREE FLOW EXHAUST AND MATCHING CAM TIMING FOR IDEAL RESULTS

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!


 
RickWI 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 1669

Loc: Madison, WI
Reg: 10-08-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
11-27-03 02:10 PM - Post#335654    
    In response to

At one of my best friends shop. He and I went halfs on a refill station a couple of years ago. The shop is between Columbus and Sun Prairie on Hwy V, right off of Hwy 151. That is the same exit as the Columbus 151 Speedway. Shop is right on that corner, you'll see the big AC Delco sign. the name of the shop is JRC Enterprises, phone is 608-825-1060. Its only about 10-15 minutes from Madison.

70 SS Camaro, Dart Aluminum SmBlk 454 CI, 125 MPH (on the motor) in the quarter and 18 MPG on Power Tour


 
jamiem 
Member
Posts: 3

Reg: 11-30-03
Re: nitrous info / answers
11-30-03 04:37 PM - Post#335655    
    In response to

i know if u dont follow instructions and retard the timing like it says like me i learnt the hard way bout 2 weeks ago when i burnt a hole is side of my piston on a 100 shot



 
quick_16 
Senior Member
Posts: 221
quick_16
Loc: South Florida
Reg: 12-13-03
Re: nitrous info / answers
12-27-03 04:16 PM - Post#335656    
    In response to jamiem

Just my two cents ... I had an issue on my dragster that the more I looked the more I had problems solving, but eventually did. I had the Hobbs switch on the regulated side and I just could not get it to work after starting the season a few years ago. All looked at it a great in the trailer. It worked perfect... I hooked up a pressure transmitter (from the Data collector) to the regulated fuel side and man o man was the pressure regulation bad. I run Methanol Fuel Injection and use Gas fuel for the NO System. Keep in mind this was a system that worked perfect for 2 years. I use it for 2 to 4 sec out of the hole (.1 sec delay) to make a bump spot at a local race. I collected data on the voltage, changed the voltage source and grounds to the pump, changed the pump, changed the regulator again. The data always showed a 2 to 3 cycle swing on start (+/-4psi or more) + the pressure was all over the place when for the duration of the spray. I finally sprung for a NOS brand fuel regulator (the one with the large red top and the vacuum port) this helped but still not perfect. Mind you the car is getting down the track by no OK at least as good as the last two seasons. NOTE: I would have never messed with it beyond this point if the data was not telling me there was an issue. The last step was a made a small bypass using a NOS brand jet and receiver fitting from the regulator out back to the tank using A/N #3 line. BTW The GAS fuel tank is a Jazz Jr Dragster plastic tank. I soldered the jet closed and drilled a small hole in so the bypass is small. If the bypass is too big it also has a poor effect on regulation. My guess is about 10% to 20% of the flow needed is about right. This stopped the cycling on start and improved the regulation to hold +/- 1 psi. My advice to anyone that is using NO in a serious application, is to collect some data on the fuel pressure because it may not be as good as you may think. BTW the Hobbs switch. is back on the regulator output side. That's a tell tail. If you have to bypass it you have regulation issues. I see many cars with it bypassed. A real roll of the dice.

98 C2500 Suburban 05 M&M dual slip 4 link 236" Dragster 70 SS 454 Chevelle


 
grumpyvette 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator -- Performance Subject Matter Expert --
Posts: 17207
grumpyvette
Age: 70
Loc: FLORIDA USA
Reg: 03-16-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
01-23-04 06:49 AM - Post#335657    
    In response to grumpyvette

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/42538/index1.html



HERES WHATS LEFT OF A CAR AFTER AN THE DRIVER PARKED THE CAR AND LEFT THE BOTTLE HEATER RUNNING,ON A FULL NITROUS TANK, keep in mind stupidity and engines don,t play well together!!! nitrous is safe if you use your head, but like any other mechanical device you can get hurt, the exact same results would have resulted from overheating a scuba diving tank,nitrous is not AN explosive, but it is placed under thousands of PSI in the tanks
NOTICE THERES NO BURN MARKS ALL DAMAGE RESULTED FROM THE BOTTLE EXPLOADING DUE TO THE HEATER LEFT RUNNING AND A DEFECTIVE OR UNUSED SAFTEY VALVE


IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!


 
old rusty c10 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1484
old rusty c10
Loc: brooklyn NY and upstate ...
Reg: 10-18-03
worth
03-27-04 06:07 PM - Post#335658    
    In response to

my question is what is a NOS kit Moroso7630 worth its the one with the 10 lb canister mounts etc complete installed once almost immediately removed and then packed away worth? this is not an offer to sell, just a question before i list this thing?

Proud owner of a 1982 c 10 pickup
"My hair's turning white, my neck's always been red, my collar's still blue"
- Lynyrd Skynyrd


 
PhatOne 
Senior Member
Posts: 514
PhatOne
Loc: Dallas, Tx, USA
Reg: 12-13-01
Re: worth
03-31-04 10:15 AM - Post#335659    
    In response to old rusty c10

well guys here is what i used to go by for my nitrous system. copied it from the page i had bookmarked

Nitrous oxide systems make large amounts of torque by allowing an engine to burn more fuel at a lower rpm range than normal. Burning more fuel this way creates a longer burn period (and slightly higher cylinder pressures, if the timing is not corrected), that will push down on the pistons with greater average force. When the nitrous is injected into an engine and the initial combustion takes place, it creates enough heat to separate the nitrous oxide into its two components, nitrogen and oxygen. Once separated, the additional oxygen is then free to allow combustion of the additional fuel, while the released nitrogen acts as a buffer against detonation and damps mechanical loads.

To run nitrous successfully and safely, you have to introduce precise amounts of additional fuel with precise amounts of nitrous oxide. All of the extra oxygen provided by the nitrous oxide must have fuel with which to burn or you may damage your engine severely. When the amount of nitrous and the amount of supplemental fuel is controlled precisely, your engine can safely and reliably generate exceptional power increases.

Combustion
Nitrous oxide does not burn, it is an oxidiser. It provides more oxygen, so more fuel can be burned, and the result is more power. The atoms in a nitrous oxide molecule are bonded together. The oxygen is not free, but fortunately the bond breaks down as temperature rises. At 565° F, the bond is broken and the oxygen is then free. Combustion temperatures are much more than 565°, so it's not a problem. By adding nitrous oxide to an engine, the total amount of oxygen is increased while the volume of nitrogen is decreased (as a percentage of the whole). This speeds the burn rate and requires less timing advance for peak output. It is hard for many people to grasp gaining power with less timing, but it's a fact. Peak cylinder pressure must occur at approximately 20°ATDC to make peak power. If you speed the burn rate, peak cylinder pressure will occur too soon. It is easy to run too much ignition advance with nitrous, but too much will not only hurt power, it can quickly bring a nitrous engine into detonation and destroy it.

Detonation
Large power increases achieved by using nitrous oxide can increase the chance of detonation. To keep the engine out of detonation, you must control the extra heat that nitrous can make. The easiest way to do this is to add more fuel. All nitrous systems come with rich jetting to give you a safe starting point. The extra fuel takes away heat and raises the detonation limit. If you don't try to over do it, and keep the hp levels within reason, running slightly richer should be all you'll need to control detonation. Running richer will reduce the power output, but raising the detonation limit will allow more nitrous to be used to get more power.

Nitrous-to-fuel Ratios
The chemically correct nitrous to petrol ratio is 9.649:1. If a nitrous engine runs lean, it can destroy the engine in a matter of seconds. There must be enough fuel to maintain this correct ratio, if there isn't, temperatures rise rapidly. The oxygen that was left over from burning the limited amount of fuel will result is a lean burn situation raising cylinder temperatures and melting components. So don't run lean.

Cooling Effects
Cooler intake air is denser and contains more oxygen atoms per cubic foot. So cooler air will allow more fuel to be burned and in turn, make more power. A 10 degree drop in temperature can add 1 to 1.5% power to an engine. Nitrous oxide boils at -129°F and it will begin to boil as soon as it is injected. This can cause an 80° or so drop in manifold air temperature. Now if we are dealing with say a 400 hp engine, we can see a gain of well over 30 hp from the cooling effect alone. This cooling effect also helps the engine deal with detonation.

Average Power
If you were to build a 350 hp 3.5 Rover V8, it would have to rev to 7000+ rpm to make that kind of power and only make power over a narrow rpm range. A nitrous injected 3.5 Rover V8 making 350 hp would make that power at a much lower rpm with a higher average horsepower. So the nitrous engine will out perform the normally aspirated engine by a healthy margin. The reason is that nitrous flow remains constant no matter what rpm the engine is running at. At lower speeds there is more time for the nitrous to fill the cylinders, so you get more nitrous in the cylinders per power stroke at lower rpm. This will boost torque and consequently power more at low rpm. As rpm increases, you will get less nitrous per power stroke, but the engine will start making more normally aspirated power. This really flattens out the torque curve and widens the power band.

So Why Not Pure Oxygen?
Air has only 23.6% oxygen by weight, the rest is made up largely of nitrogen. That nitrogen does not aid in combustion at all, but it does absorb and carry heat away. When you add nitrous, it has 36% oxygen with the rest being nitrogen. So the more nitrous oxide you add, the less percentage of nitrogen is available to absorb heat. That is why nitrous increases engine heat very rapidly. If we were to add pure oxygen (which has been tried), the percentage of nitrogen would fall even lower as more oxygen was added. We would not be able to add much oxygen before heat was a problem to control. Also compressed oxygen is in a gaseous form, so adding oxygen takes up more room and reduces normally aspirated power, and the amount of nitrogen from it. To put it simply, using nitrous oxide, we can get more oxygen atoms in the engine and have a lot more nitrogen as well. Nitrous can make much more power before heat is uncontrollable.

A Nitrous Engine - Choosing a Camshaft
Optimum cam timing for a nitrous motor will be different than optimum timing for that same motor off the bottle, so you will have to make a choice as to whether you want the most power with or without nitrous. Obviously if you are driving the car on the street most of the time, you will want the best power off the bottle. If you find that you can spare some power to make your car faster at the track, picking a camshaft to favour nitrous can make a substantial difference when nitrous is in use. Of course it is a trade off, but usually the power that you make on the bottle, will be far greater than the amount lost off the bottle.

Pumping Losses
Nitrous oxide adds oxygen, much of which is in liquid form. So you can see that a large intake valve and port is not required or desirable. Larger intake ports cause more of the nitrous to turn to a gas and reduce the amount of normally aspirated power, if the nitrous takes up more room, there will be less room for air, reducing volumetric efficiency. Also, you do not want or need long intake duration or a very high lift, so the intake side of the cam does not need to be any different when nitrous is used. The exhaust is a totally different story. All that extra oxygen and fuel makes for a substantial increase in exhaust gas volume. How can the exhaust valves deal with this? It can't, pumping losses go out of sight. Much of the extra power made in the cylinders never makes it to the flywheel, because it is used to push out the exhaust. Since making the exhaust valve large enough and the port flow enough is impractical with most cylinder heads, we must take other actions to cut pumping losses (which is actually just a band aid fix).

Reducing Pumping Losses
The first obvious step is to use a dual pattern cam with longer exhaust duration. Opening the valve earlier will help by getting the valve open more and bleeding off some pressure before the piston starts moving up the bore. This does eat into the power stroke, but more power is freed up than would be made by holding it closed longer (the best solution would be a larger valve and better port). The blow down phase (overlap period) becomes very important in a nitrous engine, because the gas has a much greater velocity and can over scavenge, closing the exhaust valve a little earlier helps. Anytime you make more power by reducing pumping losses, you are freeing up horsepower that already existed in the cylinders. The engine will still experience the same loads, but more power will be put to the flywheel and less will be used to push out exhaust.

Camshaft Specs
As said earlier, the intake needs to remain pretty much the same, but the exhaust needs more duration, an earlier opening point and an earlier closing point. To make this happen, you need to use a dual pattern cam with more exhaust timing, and a wider lobe separation angle. Cam's with 112-116° lobe separations are common is nitrous motors. To keep the intake timing the same, you must install the cam advanced, usually 6-8° advanced. The good thing about this is that advancing a cam will bring more low-end (at a trade off of top-end) when running without the nitrous and the wider lobe centre angle will also help idle and vacuum. Even the most radical nitrous profiles are usually pretty tame on the street. Ultra high lift cams are not need to make power with nitrous. On the exhaust side, the low lift flow is the most important thing, and must be dealt with much more seriously than high lift flow.

Intake Port Work
Nitrous adds so much oxygen that getting oxygen in is no longer a problem. A large intake port is not needed or desired. The larger the port, the more surface area it has and the intake charge will have lower velocity. Slower moving nitrous has more time to turn from a liquid to a gas, so a large port will have less liquid nitrous getting in the cylinder. As nitrous turns to a gas it will expand, taking up room in the intake and reducing the amount of normally aspirated air. More surface area will give the nitrous more area to absorb heat, which will cause even more nitrous to turn into gas. The same goes for large intake valves. The intake valve is the hottest part of the intake system and when nitrous is involved you don't want excess surface area on the valve. The exhaust is a different story.

Exhaust Port Work
All the extra exhaust has to be dealt with. The exhaust valves of a nitrous engine are almost always too small. When possible it is best to reduce the size of the intake to allow room for a bigger exhaust valve. The head of the exhaust valve should not have any sharp edges. It should have a nice smooth radius to allow the exhaust to travel around it as easily as possible. The valve job on the exhaust is the most important part. There will be much more cylinder pressure when the exhaust valve opens which means there will be more burnt gasses trying to escape through the valve at low lifts. Low lift exhaust flow should be your number one concern (up to about .300" lift). A good multi angle valve job is the best bang for the buck in a nitrous engine. The short side radius will usually benefit from a straight cut to the port floor. The area directly past the seat should be as wide as possible. The valve seats should be slightly wider also (.010"-.015") to help get rid of some of the extra heat in the valves.

Combustion Chamber modifications
Usually you cannot do much chamber work without reducing compression and being forced to use a high dome that hurts power. With nitrous, a high compression ratio is not needed, so some work can be done in this area. Nitrous can make very respectable power with compression ratio up to 10:1. First step is to angle the exhaust valve as much as possible so the gasses can move around the valve easily. The next step is to polish the combustion chamber and remove any sharp edges. Sharp edges will be the first to get hot and cause detonation (as well as be the first to melt). Polishing the combustion chamber will help keep carbon build up to a minimum (a good idea for any engine).










 
PhatOne 
Senior Member
Posts: 514
PhatOne
Loc: Dallas, Tx, USA
Reg: 12-13-01
Re: worth
03-31-04 10:59 AM - Post#335660    
    In response to PhatOne

one more for me. many items may be a repeat but i am far to tired to read to edit so i will paste in its full form. sorry for any dups to other post here


A particularly long post im afraid. Information gathered from various sources, and needs to be tidied, but interesting reading none the less.

Injecting nitrous into a standard engine is not risky provided you are sensible, get greedy or use it badly and you will kill it. You dont have to "build" you engine but the stronger it is the more you could inject. There are people on here injecting 100 shot on standard engines.

The only mods I would consider before adding a nitrous kit is beefing up you ignition as this is the only area I have personally had problems.

I compiled a word document which consisted of all the useful bits on websites I visited before getting my kit. Its mostly just cut and pasted and I have tidied it up a bit from the 32 pages it was originally and it could probably do with some more but heres how it appears in the files section on the Yahoo group, hopefully it will help you:

"Now before we wade in too deep, nitrous is not a fuel. Neither is it called nitro (that is a fuel and a very volatile one) , NOS (this is the trademark of Nitrous Oxide Systems), NAWZ (thank you “The Fast And The Furious”) or NO2 (Nitrogen Dioxide (I think!)). If you want to avoid looking an ######, don't call it any of these, OK?

How Does Nitrous Oxide Work?

There are three points. First, nitrous oxide is comprised of 2 parts nitrogen and one part oxygen (36% oxygen by weight). When the nitrous oxide is heated to approximately 572F (on compression stroke), it breaks down and releases extra oxygen; however, it is not this oxygen alone which creates additional power, but the ability of this oxygen to burn more fuel. By burning more fuel, higher cylinder pressures are created and this is where most of the additional power is realised.
Secondly, as pressurised nitrous oxide is injected into the intake manifold, it changes from a liquid to a gas (boils). This boiling affect reduces the temperature of the nitrous to a minus .127 Degrees F. This "cooling affect" in turn significantly reduces intake charge temperatures by approximately 60-75 Degrees F. This also helps create additional power. A general rule of thumb: For every 10 Degrees F. reduction in intake charge temperature, a 1% increase in power will be realised. Example: A 350 HP engine with an intake temperature drop of 70 Degrees F, would gain approximately 25 HP on the cooling affect alone.
The third point, the nitrogen that was also released during the compression stroke performs an important role. Nitrogen acts to "buff or dampen" the increased cylinder pressures leading to a controlled combustion process.

Why N20?

Nitrous oxide injection has become a very popular option for today's performance enthusiast for several reasons:
N20 offers you more performance per dollar spent, than any other performance modification.
N20 installations are relatively easy to accomplish.
Since N20 is used only when needed, it offers you the advantages of complete drivability and normal gas mileage while not "on the button."
Systems available for virtually any power need from 5 HP to over 500 extra HP.
One of the few performance options available for today's computer controlled, fuel injected engines.
Systems can easily be removed or transferred to another vehicle.

Q: Will N20 affect engine reliability?
Probably.......... One day its inevitable so just accept it!

Q: Can I simply bolt a N20 kit onto my stock engine?
A: Yes, There are N20 systems for virtually any stock engine application. The key is to choose the correct kit for a given application; i.e., 4 cylinder. engines normally allow an extra 40-60 HP, 6 cylinder. engines usually work great between 75-100 extra HP, small block V8's (302/350/400cid) can typically accept up to 140 extra HP, and big block V8's (427/454) might accept from 125-200 extra HP. These suggested ranges provide maximum reliability from most stock engines using cast pistons and cast crank with few or no engine modifications.

Q: What are some of the general rules for even higher H.P. gains?
A: Generally, forged aluminium pistons are one of the best modifications you can make. Retard ignition timing by 4-8 degrees. In many cases a higher flowing fuel pump may be necessary. Higher octane (100+) racing type fuel may be required as well as spark plugs 1 to 2 heat ranges colder than normal with gaps closed to .025"-.030".

Q: How much performance improvement can I expect with a nitrous system?
A: Loads.....

Q: How long will the bottle last?
A: Approximately 10bhp per lb per min. So a 2.25 lb bottle on a bike will give just less than a minute with a 25bhp increase.

Q: When is the best time to use nitrous?
A: At wide open throttle only. Due to the tremendous amount of increased torque, you will generally find best results, traction permitting, at early activation.

Q: Will I have to rejet my carburettor on my car when adding nitrous?
A: No! The N20 system is independent of your carburettor and injects its own mixture of fuel and nitrous.

Q: Is nitrous oxide flammable?
A: No. Nitrous oxide by itself is non-flammable. However, the oxygen present in nitrous oxide causes combustion of fuel to take place more rapidly.

Q: Will nitrous oxide cause detonation?
A: Not directly. Detonation is the result of too little fuel present during combustion (lean) or too low of an octane of fuel. Too much ignition advance also causes detonation.

Q: Is there any performance increase in using medical grade nitrous oxide?
A: None! All the same.

Q: Is it a good idea to use an aftermarket computer chip in conjunction with a Nitrous System?
A: Only if the chip had been designed specifically for use with nitrous oxide. Most aftermarket chips use more aggressive timing advance curves to create more power. This can lead to potential detonation. You may wish to check with the manufacturer of the chip before using it. The top manufacturers, such as APE & Superchips do make special chips for use with nitrous.

Q: Does nitrous oxide raise cylinder pressures and temperatures?
A: Yes. Due to the ability to burn more fuel, this is exactly why nitrous makes so much power.

Q: Are there any benefits to chilling the nitrous bottle?
A: No. Chilling the bottle lowers the pressure dramatically and will also lower the flow rate of the nitrous causing a fuel rich condition and reducing power. On cold evenings you might run on the rich side. For optimal running conditions, keep bottle pressure at approximately 800-900 psi.

Q: Are there benefits to using nitrous with turbo or supercharger applications?
A: Absolutely! In turbo applications, turbo lag is completely eliminated with the addition of a nitrous system. In addition, both turbo and superchargers compress the incoming air, thus heating it. With the injection of nitrous, a tremendous intercooling effect reduces intake charge temperatures by 75 degrees or more. Boost is usually increased as well; adding to even more power.

Q: Will the use of nitrous oxide affect the catalytic converter?
A: No. The increase in oxygen present in the exhaust may actually increase the efficiency of the converter. Since the use of nitrous is normally limited to 10-20 seconds of continuous use, there usually are no appreciable effects. Temperatures are typically well within acceptable standards.

Q: Can high compression engines utilise nitrous oxide?
A: Absolutely. High or low compression ratios can work quite suitably with nitrous oxide provided the proper balance of nitrous and fuel enrichment is maintained. N2O kits are used in applications from relatively low compression stock type motors to Pro-Modifieds, which often exceed 15 to 1. Generally, the higher the compression ratio, the more ignition retard, as well as higher octane fuel, is required. For more specific information talk to a qualified technicians.

Q: What type of cam is best suited for use with nitrous oxide?
A: Generally, cams that have more exhaust overlap and duration. However, it is best to choose a cam tailored to normal use (when nitrous is not activated) since 99% of most vehicle operation is not at full throttle. There are special cam grinds available for nitrous competition which have more aggressive exhaust profiles etc. Since cam selection depends largely on vehicle weight, gearing, etc., it is best to stick to cam manufacturer's recommendations for your particular goal.

Q: What type of nitrous system is better; a plate injection system or a direct port injection system? (Car)
A: The advantages of a plate system are ease of installation and removal, ability to transfer easily to another vehicle, ability to change jetting combinations quickly, and, in most cases, provide you with all the extra HP you will ever need (75 to 350 more HP). In some cases, such as in-line type engines with long runners, a direct port type system is advisable for maximising distribution.

Q: Should I modify my fuel system to use nitrous oxide?
A: Most stock fuel pumps will work adequately for smaller nitrous applications. It is important to check to see if your pump can flow enough fuel to your existing fuel system (whether carburettor or fuel injected), as well as being able to supply the additional fuel required by the nitrous kit under full throttle conditions. It may be a good idea to dedicate a separate fuel pump to the nitrous kit.

Q: What are the advantages of using nitrous compared to other performance options?
A: The cost of many other performance options can put you in the poorhouse. Dollar for dollar, you can't buy more performance with less money than nitrous. With a nitrous system, performance and reliability can be had for a much more reasonable price while retaining the advantages of a stock engine during normal driving. And, nitrous offers tremendous gains in torque without having to rev the engine to excessive rpm's. These factors help your engine last longer than many other methods of boosting horsepower.

Q: How do I know how much nitrous is left in the bottle?
A: The most reliable way is to weigh the bottle to determine how many pounds remain. When a bottle is near empty (about 20% or less nitrous remaining) a surging effect is normally felt.

Q: What is the function of the blow-off safety valve on the bottle?
A: It is very important not to overfill a bottle; i.e., a 10 lb. capacity bottle should not be filled with more than 10 lb. of nitrous oxide by weight. Over-filling and/or too much heat can cause excessive bottle pressures forcing the safety seal to blow and releasing all the contents out of the bottle.

Q: Will I have to change my ignition system?
A: Most late model ignition systems are well suited for nitrous applications. In some higher HP cases, it may be advisable to look into a high quality high output ignition system.

Some people think that you flip a switch and then the nitrous (and extra fuel) is flowing and you just hold on for dear life. That is not how a modern nitrous system works (or should work). The system actually contains three controls, the first one is that you have to open the valve on the bottle (usually in the morning and then you close it at night), the second one is an arming switch mounted somewhere in the cockpit. Unless that switch is on, nothing will happen under any condition. The third switch is usually mounted under the hood, next to the throttle. It's a small micro switch that closes (meaning it's on) when you push the gas pedal to the floor, it only activates when you have wide open throttle (WOT). When all these three controls/switches are "on", the nitrous and the extra fuel is injected into the engine. This makes a modern nitrous system very safe, if something isn't right (engine doesn't sound right, tires are spinning too much, the cops are approaching, ...), just release the gas pedal as you normally would and the nitrous will instantly be turned off. It can't be much simpler than that, every condition except WOT and the car will behave as if it has never even heard of nitrous, but push the load pedal to the floor and you'll have the ride of your life!

Q: Can I abuse the engine as much as I want to?
A: No you can't. There are certain rules you have to follow if you want to live a happy nitrous life. The first thing you have to think about is, NEVER EVER let it run lean. A lean condition (meaning that there is not enough fuel for the available oxygen) is very destructive to an engine and especially when you're running nitrous. The temperature in the cylinder gets very high and the fuel detonates instead of burns. The probable outcome is melted pistons, burnt valves, blown head gasket, cracked head or other unpleasant things.
The next thing is, don't try to force your engine to do things it doesn't like. If you have a turbo or a supercharger or even nothing at all, it will not make much power at low rpms. Put in 5'th gear and slow down to 1000 rpm, now push the pedal to the metal and the car will start to accelerate, very slowly, because the engine doesn't produce much hp at that speed. Nitrous is completely different, as soon as you hit WOT (with the system armed) it will inject a fixed amount of nitrous and fuel. It doesn't care if the engine is at 1000 rpm or 7000 rpm, it will do the same thing. If you have the nitrous system set for 50 hp, it will add 50 hp even if the engine is at 1000 rpm. Since the system injects a fixed amount regardless of rpm, the lower the rpm, the more nitrous will burn per power stroke. At low rpm's that creates a very high cylinder pressure and can cause problems. The solution is simple, don't engage the nitrous (i.e. no WOT) at too low rpm.

Q: How low is too low?
A: It depends on how much hp the nitrous is set for and which gear you are in. If you have a 50 hp setting, don't engage under 2000 rpm in 1-3 gear and not under 2500 rpm in 4-5. For a 75 hp setting increase each with 500 rpm.

This sounds dangerous!
No it isn't if you keep it in mind. If you feel that you want some extra security, it's easy to put in an rpm-switch that will block the nitrous until a certain rpm is reached.
The third thing you should think about is, don't hit it too long. It's the same thing as with turbo or supercharger systems, when they produce this wonderful power they also generate a lot of heat. Don't push the pedal to the floor and keep it there until you reach the rev limiter in 5'th. Long hard pulls generate a lot of heat and pistons and valves are sensitive to that. If you want to see how fast it goes, push it 99% (just before the nitrous engages) until it doesn't go any faster and then engage the nitrous.
If you are tinkering under the hood, keep the nitrous unarmed. If the engine is running and you accidentally engage it, see above. If the engine isn't running and you accidentally engage it, don't even think about starting it, even if you "hit" just for a millisecond. Unscrew your spark plugs and crank it for a long time.

Q: How do I prevent it from running lean?
A: Either you have to run the nitrous on the safe side (i.e. very rich air/fuel mixture) or you have to get some gauges. A nitrous pressure gauge mounted on the bottle is a must because you need to see when it's time to refill. That gauge is also a good monitor for how lean you are going to be when you engage the system. If the car has been sitting in the hot California sun for several hours, the pressure can be 1200 psi (optimal pressure is 950 psi). If you then go out and "hit" it, you'll probably be running lean. That doesn't mean that you can't engage it, it just mean that you should do short bursts (a few seconds) and pay close attention to how the engine sounds. A really good investment is an oxygen sensor monitor. It connects to your engines oxygen sensor and will show you directly if you're running lean or rich or just right.

Q: Do I need anything more than the basic kit?
A: Not really, but there are two things that I recommend. The first one is a bottle heater. It's a thermostat controlled heating element that you wrap around the nitrous bottle, it's very easy to install and unless you live in a place where the temperature is *always* above 85 F, it'll be the best investment you'll ever make. The air/fuel ratio is dependant on the nitrous pressure and the nitrous pressure is dependant on the bottle temperature. With a bottle heater to keep your pressure constant, you'll be a million times more happy with the system than without one.
The next thing is an oxygen sensor monitor, it'll give you piece of mind and you'll learn much more about how the system actually works.

Different types of systems.

You can divide nitrous systems up in categories based on different criteria:

If you look at how the fuel is added, you have dry and wet systems.
If you look at how the nitrous is injected, you have single injector or direct port systems.
If you look at the way the nitrous is controlled, you have single stage, multiple stage and progressive systems.

Dry manifold.

This means that the nitrous is injected by itself into the intake manifold. Fuel is added by increasing the amount that the normal fuel injectors are supplying. This can be done by either instructing the ECU to add more fuel or by increasing the fuel pressure like most turbo and supercharger kits do. Also of interest is that a dry system that adds fuel by increasing the fuel pressure is incompatible with turbo/supercharger systems that uses a rising rate pressure regulator. A dry system can use either a single central injector or a direct port configuration. A direct port dry system with the proper ECU support would be a really good solution.

Wet manifold.

This means that you inject both nitrous and fuel separate from the normal fuel delivery. Usually the fuel and the nitrous is injected through a combined injector (usually called a fogger but this is a trade name of Nitrous Oxide Systems or NOS).

Single injector.
This actually refers to a single point of injection. It can be a fogger or an injection plate. Injection plates are mostly used on V8's but they do exist for other engines also. For most types of engine the most common is to use a single fogger somewhere before the throttle body. The problem with single point injection is that the distribution of nitrous (and fuel if it's a wet system) between the cylinders can be less than perfect. In a wet system that means that the distribution of power between the cylinders will be uneven. In a dry system it means that the air/fuel ration will vary between them and that is really bad (can lead to burned valves).
The problem with wet single injector systems is that you can get puddeling of fuel in the intake system (sometimes called fuel drop). This seems to be more of a problem for V8's and not so much for small 4-cyl engines.
Direct port
With a direct port system you put (at least) one injector for each cylinder, that way there is no mixing between the cylinders and perfect distribution and air/fuel ratio can be archived. One thing to remember is that for a small engine there is a limit to how low you can go in power with a wet direct port system. If you feed the injectors directly from the stock fuel line it's about 75 hp and if you put in a pressure regulator you can get it down to 50 hp. A direct port system is also more complicated to install since it requires that the intake manifold be removed for drilling and tapping.
Single stage
A single stage system means that there is only on or off and that you inject the same amount of nitrous (and fuel if it's a wet system) all the time regardless of rpm or load. This makes for a very easy system, both to install and to understand. Single stage systems are also the most common. The problem with this kind of system is that the low end rpms limits how much nitrous you can inject and the engine will be starved (well, at least not showing its full potential) at the higher rpms.
Multi-stage
You put several "normal" nitrous stages together and trigger them at different times. This type is most common in drag racing where you launch on the first stage and then enable more stages as speed increases. This is usually controlled by timers. The advantage over a single stage system is obvious, you can start to inject a safe 50 hp at 2000 rpm and then add a healthy 50 more at 4000 rpm for example. The down side is cost and complexity.
Progressive controllers
Here you start out with a "normal" nitrous kit (usually a port injection) and add an electronic controller. The controller opens and closes the solenoids about 20-30 times/second. By varying the duty cycle, it controls the amount of nitrous and fuel that is injected. There are several brands and types of this controller. Some modulate depending on the rpms, some on throttle position, some on time and the really advanced have a combination of these.

Bottle heaters
The purpose of a bottle heater is to keep the nitrous bottle warm, duh!
The pressure of the nitrous (and therefore the air/fuel ratio) is depending on the temperature of the nitrous. The trick to keeping the air/fuel ratio consistent (which is the key to making good power and staying out of trouble) is to keep the temperature consistent. The biggest weakness of a nitrous system is the temperature dependence and a bottle heater goes a long way of solving that. It isn't perfect since it doesn't cool the bottle when it gets too hot, but it's much better than nothing.
Nitrous Express have a bottle heater that regulates the heat based on the nitrous pressure. The NOS guys said that there are several problems with that 1) The Nitrous Express kit measures the pressure after the bottle valve, if you close the bottle valve and forget the heater on, BOOM! 2) When you start heating the bottle, the pressure will rise quickly without the whole bottle being warm. When you then open the solenoid the excess pressure blows out and you are left with the pressure that your cold nitrous can produce. The NOS bottle heater measures the temperature of the bottle instead. The kit they had before wasn't any good because 1) The heater element was too small, it sometimes took 20 minutes to get a bottle up to 84 from 60 F. 2) The temp sensor wasn't any good, it would sometimes not record the temperature of the bottle correctly making the heater heat it too much. A new one that solves these issues is already designed but at the time of this writing there was problems with a sub-contractor.
If you have a bottle heater, it's a good thing to have a bottle blanket. It keeps the bottle temperature more stable and makes life a little easier for the heater.

Purge valve
A purge valve can be use for two things. When the system is pressurised (valves open but the solenoid is closed), the nitrous in the line closest to the solenoid starts to turn in to gas instead of liquid. The primary usage of a purge valve is to let that gas out so you'll have liquid at the solenoid. The other thing you can use it for is to let the pressure out of the system after you've closed the valves, thereby releasing the pressure on the solenoid and extending its life.


Nitrous Oxide Myths

I'm not using nitrous, that stuff will blow up my engine!
While nitrous oxide has the potential to cause engine damage, it can provide years of safe and effective horsepower gains if installed and operated properly. Obviously, an expert on how to utilise nitrous oxide should be consulted before a kit is installed.

How can my stock engine deal with the additional horsepower?
There are no guarantees when increasing engine performance above the manufacturer's specifications. However, most manufacturers have a "safety margin" designed into their engines that allows for increases in horsepower with no detrimental effects. Also, because the use of nitrous oxide is driver controlled, its exposure to your engine occurs when desired only, allowing the engine to operate under normal conditions most of the time.

Is it legal to use nitrous oxide?
Yes, but be careful where and when you use it. Obviously if you use it every time you leave the traffic lights you will attract attention, and will be stopped. I know its called laughing gas, but the smile will be wiped off your face if you use it in the wrong places.

What if the bottle blows up?!
Nitrous oxide itself is not flammable. It does contain a high amount of oxygen which, when combined with fuel, causes a more rapid and powerful explosion.
This column is not meant to endorse the use of nitrous oxide because its advantages will likely appeal to a narrow range of automotive enthusiasts. The concept of regularly filling a container with nitrous oxide just to get extra bursts of speed goes beyond the average driver's tolerance level. At the same time, nitrous oxide should not be dismissed as a risky or primitive performance modification used by speed freaks (certain characters from "The Road Warrior" movie not withstanding). Its cost, ease of use, and real-world performance gains make it a viable option to fulfil your need for speed

Ever stopped to think about what you're actually doing when you add a bigger carb, port a cylinder head, add bigger valves, a larger lift and duration cam, or indeed a turbo or supercharger? Quite simply, you're trying to improve the flow of air into the combustion chambers.
And the reason you do this is? The more air you get in, the more you can mix it with fuel. And the more fuel you burn, the more power you make - it's as simple as that.
But the more highly-tuned your motor is, the more of an inconvenience it is to live with. Let's face it, a cam that comes in at 4500 revs means you're going to be constantly slipping the clutch trying to keep engine speeds up. In traffic, that's a complete pain.
But there is a way of introducing monstrous levels of oxygen so you can burn more fuel, instantly And it's called nitrous oxide.

Nitrous Oxide Tips.

Always relieve the pressure on the nitrous solenoid. Don't leave the bottle valve open when not using the nitrous. Clear the nitrous from the line and then reseal it to prevent dirt from entering.
If it's in your budget, use a purge valve. This will insure that you get the proper mix of nitrous and fuel the first instant you hit the activate button When the nitrous comes out of the bottle and sits in the line it changes state from liquid to gas and is not very effective. If you don't use a purge it won't hurt the motor because it's a fuel-rich condition; but it will hurt performance. I notice quite a difference in 60ft. times with and without purging.
Rebuild the solenoids every two years. The rebuild kit for each solenoid is about $40 and will insure proper operation. It's a simple job and requires no special tools. (Believe me you don't want to hit the button and find out that your fuel solenoid isn't working.)
The amount of nitrous injected into your motor is controlled by two things, the jet you select and the pressure in the bottle. Ideal bottle pressure is 900psi. The temperature of the bottle effects the pressure inside. Heat makes it rise and cold makes it fall. I have seen people take a propane torch and heat the bottle. NEVER EVER do this. If you see someone doing this RUN, don't walk, in the other direction. The bottle can explode causing serious injury. If you race in cold temperatures, there is an electric heater available.
There are three types of nitrous oxide available. First is the medical grade, like dentists us, 2nd is the industrial grade, which is the same as the medical grade but it's not purified, and 3rd is called Nytrous+, which has sulphur added, preventing anyone from inhaling it for kicks (and possible brain damage). I have tried all three types and there is no difference in ET among them. However, when using industrial grade or Nytrous+, make sure to use a nitrous filter because they do contain small foreign particles, which can clog your nitrous solenoid.

Q: What are some of the general rules for even higher H.P. gains?
A: Generally, forged aluminium pistons are one of the best modifications you can make. Retard ignition timing by 4-8 degrees (1 to 11/2 degrees timing retard per 50 H.P. gain). In many cases a higher flowing fuel pump may be necessary. Higher octane (100+) racing type fuel may be required as well as spark plugs 1 to 2 heat ranges colder than normal with gaps closed to .025"-.030". For gains over 250 H.P., other important modifications could be necessary in addition to those mentioned above. These special modifications may include a forged crankshaft, a high quality race type connecting rod, a high output fuel pump dedicated to feeding the additional fuel demands of the nitrous system, and a racing fuel with high specific gravity and an octane rating of 110 or more.

Q: How much performance improvement can I expect with a nitrous system?
A: For many applications an improvement from 1 to 3 full seconds and 10 to 15 MPH in the quarter mile can be expected. Factors such as engine size, tires, jetting, gearing, etc. will effect the final results.

Q: How long can I hold the nitrous button down?
A: It is possible to hold the button down until the bottle is empty. However 15 continuous seconds at a time, or less, is recommend.

Q: When is the best time to use nitrous?
A: At wide open throttle only (unless a progressive controller is used). Due to the tremendous amount of increased torque, you will generally find best results, traction permitting, at early activation. Nitrous can be safely applied above 2,500 RPM under full throttle conditions.

Q: Is nitrous oxide flammable?
A: No. Nitrous oxide by itself is non-flammable. However, the oxygen present in nitrous oxide causes combustion of fuel to take place more rapidly.

Q: Will nitrous oxide cause detonation?
A: Not directly. Detonation is the result of too little fuel present during combustion (lean) or too low of an octane of fuel. Too much ignition advance also causes detonation. In general, most of our kits engineered for stock type engines will work well with premium type fuels and minimal decreases of ignition timing. In racing applications where higher compression ratios are used, resulting in higher cylinder pressures, a higher fuel octane must be used as well as more ignition retard.

Q: Is there any performance increase in using medical grade nitrous oxide?
A: None! NOS recommends and sells only the automotive grade, called Ny-trous Plus. Ny-trous Plus contains a minimal amount of sulphur dioxide (100 ppm) as a deterrent to substance abuse. The additive does not affect performance.

Q: Is it a good idea to use an aftermarket computer chip in conjunction with an NOS System?
A: Only if the chip had been designed specifically for use with nitrous oxide. Most aftermarket chips use more aggressive timing advance curves to create more power. This can lead to potential detonation. You may wish to check with the manufacturer of the chip before using it. The top manufacturers, such as Hypertech do make special chips for use with nitrous.

Q: Does nitrous oxide raise cylinder pressures and temperatures?
A: Yes. Due to the ability to burn more fuel, this is exactly why nitrous makes so much power.

Q: What effect does nitrous have on an engine with considerable miles on it?
A: This depends largely on the actual condition of the engine components. Any performance modification to an engine that is worn out or poorly tuned will have detrimental effects. However, an engine in good condition, with good ring and head gasket sealing, should be able to use nitrous without any abnormal wear.

Q: Will the use of nitrous oxide affect the catalytic converter?
A: No. The increase in oxygen present in the exhaust may actually increase the efficiency of the converter. Since the use of nitrous is normally limited to 10-20 seconds of continuous use, there usually are no appreciable effects. Temperatures are typically well within acceptable standards.

Q: Will the percentage of performance increase be the same in a highly modified engine compared to a stock engine when using the same NOS kit and jetting?
A: Not really. In most cases the percentage of increase is greater from a stock engine because it is not as efficient as the modified engine in a normal non-nitrous mode. However, since the effects of nitrous oxide magnify the output of any engine, the total power output will be much higher in the modified engine.


Highpower FAQ
Q1) The most common question we are asked is "Will nitrous oxide DESTROY my engine"
A1) My short answer is, would I still be in business if I were RESPONSIBLE for DESTROYING ALL or ANY of my customer's engines? Obviously NOT, and that is why for over 10 years we have experimented with N20 injection on many types of engines and pushed them further than any customer would want, to ensure that this remains true. The results are that despite being subjected to extended periods of VERY high power increases all but or 2 survived without problems of any kind. My conclusion is that as long as OUR nitrous system is fitted and used correctly, to an engine in good condition without any weaknesses in the original design, then there is no reason to worry about premature engine wear or failure.

Q2) How long does a cylinder of nitrous oxide last?
A2) Just like your petrol tank it is not long enough between refills, especially when you first fit the kit and play with it as you would a new toy. However once you get past this playful stage you begin to realise what a useful boost nitrous is, and only use it when necessary, then the bottle seems to last forever before needing a fill. It is impossible to put a time to how long a bottle will lasts, as we offer three different sizes of cylinder, the biggest lasting five times as long as the smallest. Besides the size of the nitrous bottle, the size of the nitrous jet (which determines the amount of power increase, and consequently the rate of nitrous usage) can he changed from as little as 5 bhp to as much as 100 bhp, obviously the bigger jet uses more nitrous more rapidly, to be exact 20 times more rapidly. With all this in mind, a big bottle with a small jet will last the longest (approx. 60 mins of continuous use), whilst a small bottle with the biggest jet will last the shortest time (approx. 30 secs of continuous use). To add extra confusion to the calculations, if you fit a POWAMAX DIGITAL progressive nitrous delivery system, you the user can alter the power and consequently the consumption of the nitrous, however the good news is that a POWAMAX DIGITAL makes the nitrous last approx. twice as long as a normal nitrous system. In real life some customers use a bottle a day, some use a bottle a week and some take more than 2 weeks to empty the bottle, it is all down to you, as you control how often you hit the button. It is not like a propane conversion where you use the gas all the time, it is only a BOOSTER to you normal engine power and consequently you can run the car as normal if you don't want to use the gas too quickly, or when the bottle is empty.)

Q3) From where can I buy nitrous oxide refills?
A3) We or our agents (in some areas) can supply your nitrous oxide needs, but you may want to rent a large refill cylinder from your local branch of LYNDE gas, who can be found by contacting the Head office 0121 500 1000. If you have any problems with LYNDE gas you might try your local branch of Air Products or B.O.C. but don't tell them it is for automotive use, as in some areas they seem to think anyone who is crazy enough to use it on a vehicle is unsafe to sell it to. If you get a supply this way we can supply you a refill pipe/adapter cheaper than anyone else. Your final option is a local tuning shop who may stock gas.

Q4) Is a fitting service available?
A4) "HIGHPOWER" systems come complete with full fitting instructions and we offer the most comprehensive after sales service, however if you want the very best from your system then it would be wise to have either ourselves or our agents fit and fine tune the system for you, or at least carry out final checks before you use your system. Charges for our fitting service vary for each vehicle, but is usually a minimum of £150, but can run to £300 for the basic kit ONLY which includes DYNO or COMPUTER testing of your vehicle.

Q5) How much does nitrous oxide cost to buy?
A5) The average cost is in the region of £3.50/lb, but it does depend on your supplier and the quantity you purchase. Buying direct from a manufacturer can reduce the cost to about £2.50/lb. Another point worth keeping in mind whilst considering running costs, is that compared with alternative power (e.g. cams etc.), a nitrous vehicle will make considerable petrol savings when running "off gas".

Q6) Is the use of nitrous oxide "road legal"?
A6) There is no law that prohibits the use of N20 injection on road vehicles. My own cars are used on the road, and the local police are aware of my use of nitrous systems, and they confirm that they know of no law that I could be breaking. However you may need to inform your insurance company, depending on the type and wording of the policy. The same applies to ALL types of tuning, these should also be reported to your insurers.

Q7) How is the power increase determined?
A7) The power rating is calculated from the flow rate of nitrous oxide liquid through the nitrous jet, and is therefore only theoretical. The actual power increase achieved by a particular engine depends on: 1) the richness of the fuel to Nitrous ratio, e.g. Too rich, reduces the power output, ii) the engines particular characteristics, so different engines will produce different power increases from a specific amount of nitrous oxide (e.g. 1), a V6 Ford had 25 bhp injected but measured 70 bhp extra at the crank, (e.g. ii), a Shogun V6 had 25 bhp injected, but only measured a 16 bhp increase at the wheels).

Q8 ) How much power increase cam I achieve?
A8 ) HIGHPOWER systems have achieved as much as 500% power increases on some engines, without engine failure. This figure may not be attainable on all engines, but it does give you some idea of the potential of our systems. All "HIGHPOWER" systems are sent out with an initial jetting of 25 BHP in order to reduce gas wastage when carrying out initial testing, and to avoid any engine problems that maybe caused by incorrect installation. Once you have con-firmed that the system is functioning correctly on your vehicle, you can request lager jets (£10/pr I increase) which are available in up to 25 BHP increments, so you can look forward to more & more POWER from HIGHPOWER systems.

Q9) Do I need to fit any improved parts to my engine before I buy a HIGHPOWER nitrous system?
A9) NO! (not normally), but any parts that would improve a standard engine, will also be of benefit to a nitrous burner. The previous statement holds true only up to a certain power output, with each engine having its own limits on each component. The first parts to show signs of weakness when using nitrous are usually the clutch (on motorcycles which may slip at 25bhp+), then the ignition components (on motorcycles & cars which may not be powerful enough at 25bhp+). If the power is increased above 50 bhp it is possible for a piston failure to occur, but this can be prevented by retarding the timing to allow for the quicker burn rate when using nitrous oxide. If our advice is followed this should never happen if the timing is corrected when nitrous is used. Most standard engine parts will handle more power than the driver, but if you want MAXIMUM POWER then it is best to improve the aforementioned parts first. It is not in our interests to have any engine components fail, so you can rely on HIGHPOWER systems to give you good advise for maximum reliability.

Q10) Will nitrous work on turbo I supercharged, tuned or 2 stroke engines?
A10)YES! it will, as nitrous does not know what kind of engine it is entering, and on these types of engines the power output on nitrous almost always exceeds the theoretical power input calculated on the amount of nitrous used.

Q11) Does nitrous work on Diesel Turbo engines?
A11) YES! and with much better results for a given power increase than a petrol engine, as a diesel does not have an ignition system like a petrol engine and consequently the power output is not reduced by a poor condition ignition system, also the timing of the ignition sequence is not as crucial on a diesel which not only helps the power output, but also reliability. With a petrol engine detonation can soon become a limiting factor to the power output, but as tar as I can tell this is not the case on a diesel as they actually run on detonation and as a consequence are built stronger which is another reliability bonus. The biggest advantage of a diesel over a petrol engine is the diesels lack of acceleration ability, but with N20 injection this shortcoming is dis-proportionately improved. Cost is another area where a diesel has an advantage over an equivalent petrol engine, as the basic N20 systems for a diesel does not need a filet control system as a petrol engine does, which reduces the cost of a similar diesel system by approx. £100. The only limiting factor is how much fuel the engine wastes, and how much extra can be added.

Q12) How do I operate I use a nitrous system?
A12) Since we tailor make our systems to our customers requirements we can accommodate any arrangement you require, but we suggest that an arming switch (supplied with the system) be mounted within easy reach of the driver I rider, with a throttle operated micro switch (supplied with the system) mounted in such a way that it will only operate at full throttle. With the arming twitch OFF, the micro switch operating at full throttle will not fire off the system, however when the arming twitch is ON, applying full throttle will activate the N20 system, and when the throttle is released it will switch the system OFF. This way you do not need to make any unusual actions to operate the system, and you will find it just like driving a more powerful vehicle or like driving an automatic car with kick down

Highpower Technical info

Before we get too technical lets get basic by starting with the principles of something most people understand, the carburettor (any carb will do). The job of this device as I'm sure you know is to mix fuel (petrol) with the correct amount of air (oxygen) and deliver it to the engine. A Nitrous system does exactly the same thing and if you keep this in mind when tuning a system, you will have made a quantum leap towards achieving the best possible result. In practical terms this is achieved as follows;
I) a control solenoid is fed with fuel from the fuel tank either by gravity or via a fuel pump,
ii) the outlet of the control solenoid is connected to the injector/s ( via a distribution block if required ) which are fitted into the inlet tract,
iii) as with carbs the metering of the amount of fuel fed to the engine is controlled by jets, either in the injectors or in advanced systems at the outlet of the solenoid (bigger jets deliver more fuel to the engine),
iv) in place of the air which the carb meters in with the fuel, a Nitrous system meters N2O to mix with the fuel to provide the oxygen required to burn off the extra fuel supplied when the fuel control solenoid is operated. The hardware to achieve this is basically the same as the fuel system (solenoid, distribution block, and injectors), but upgraded to deal with the much higher pressure of N20 which can be up to 1,200 psi.
v) the injectors for the N2O can be built into the same body as the fuel injector, or they can be supplied separately (separate injectors are usually easier to install and give comparable results to combined injectors),
vi) the main advantage and difference between a carb and a Nitrous system is that the oxygen flow (in the form of N2O) is also controlled by metering jets, so unlike a carburettor the supply of oxygen can be adjusted quickly and accurately to suit the engines requirements,
vii) altering EITHER the fuel or N2O jet ONLY has the same effect as changing the jets in a carburettor, and in this respect a Nitrous system can be tuned like a very simple carb to achieve an optimum oxygen - fuel mixture for your engine,
viii) changing both Nitrous and fuel jets at the same time has the effect of raising or lowering the overall power output of the N2O system (assuming a correct fuel to nitrous ratio has been established as described above).
ix) in a nut shell the fuel and N2O control solenoids when activated by a switch allow fuel and N2O to flow to the injectors and into the engine, where the N2O splits into nitrogen (which suppresses detonation) and oxygen which supports the combustion of the extra fuel and that's it MORE POWER at the touch of a button (in most cases that's it, but occasionally it isn't that simple as we will see later). So there you have it, the mystical N2O system is just a simple carb which packs the potential of a big punch, and N2O is not the magical FUEL that single handily makes extra power as most people seem to think.
Another simple characteristic of engine dynamics that is frequently overlooked is the fact that an engines power is limited by the amount of fuel you can burn efficiently in the combustion chamber, and this is limited by the amount of oxygen that the engine can draw into its cylinders, which in turn is limited by the size and efficiency of the engine. Thankfully power output from Nitrous oxide injection is not much affected by these limitations, and consequently disproportionate increases can be achieved if so desired. The amount of oxygen that a Nitrous system can flow is only limited by the various holes in the system (i.e. bottle valve seat size, nitrous pipe bore size, solenoid seat size, etc.) and consequently must be restricted by the jet hole size to a level that when mixed with the correct amount of extra fuel from the system will allow a sensible amount of power to be generated by the engine.
A none nitrous engine produces a smooth power curve which is a function of rpm, because the faster the piston moves the better the cylinders fill and the more frequently the cylinders fire, however add a basic Nitrous system and it's a different story. Nitrous oxide is delivered to the engine at a constant rate (e.g. 2 lbs./min) therefore at low rpm (e.g. 2,000 rpm) each induction cycle will inhale 2 lbs. divided by 1,000 (the number of induction strokes), whilst at higher rpm (e.g. 10,000 rpm) each induction cycle will inhale 2 lbs. divided by 5,000 which is only 1/5th of the amount at 2,000 rpm. The effect this feature has on the power curve and the rider can be quite dramatic (depending on how much power is being added), the power curve suddenly becomes a vertical line rising by the amount of extra power being added by the Nitrous system, and only returns to the normal curve (although at an elevated level equal to the power increase) once it reaches the desired increased level. In actual use the rider / driver (if brave or insane enough to use this extra power in first gear and from low revs) will feel at least an INSTANT arm wrenching acceleration.
With this huge amount of power available I am frequently asked how much power can I have and will I need to do any mods to my engine to handle it all. My answer is that your stock engine will almost certainly handle more power than you the rider / driver can handle, but "What does decide the actual limit that the engine can produce" ? The first thing to keep in mind is that the engine consumes much bigger doses of nitrous per cycle at low rpm than at high rpm, therefore at low rpm where there is little inertia in the engine and the vehicle as a whole it is subjected to much greater forces which it finds difficult to get away from. The consequence of adding too much extra power to the engine at low rpm is that the piston cannot move away from the elevated pressure of combustion fast enough to keep the forces below acceptable limits, and something has to give, either the head gasket will blow, or the piston ring lands will crack, either way if the engine is not stopped immediately the piston will subsequently melt due to the lean out caused by the extra oxygen drawn into the combustion chamber through the leak.
This problem can be solved and the limit can be raised by simply retarding the timing, so that although higher pressures are being generated, they are less than the level which would cause failure because they start later in the piston cycle (i.e. less of the increased pressure occurs in or around tdc when the piston is at its most vulnerable). The same problem can be dealt with by reducing the compression ratio, as is the case with turbos etc., which in some ways would be generally beneficial (e.g. you could run normally on lower octane fuel and put your engine under less stress), plus it brings the added advantage of raising the power potential of the nitrous system before problems are encountered. Another solution is to reduce the amount of Nitrous injected at low rpm and increase it as rpm rises, in the way it can be done when a POWAMAX DIGITAL is fitted. Put all 3 solutions together and the potential power increases are astronomical! Why astronomical ? Well assuming peak combustion pressures are kept within safe limits by these 3 methods, the power output at the crank is only limited by how much inlet charge can be forced into the engine, and (forgotten by many) how much burnt charge can be forced out of the exhaust system.
With the inlet side being force fed by the nitrous pressure there is little need to make improvements there, but obviously the more nitrous and fuel that the engine is fed with, the more exhaust gases it produces, which if not effectively disposed of, will contaminate the next inlet charge thus reducing power output. Therefore instead of fitting bigger inlet valves and porting the inlet tracts, apply the same techniques to the exhaust components. With these limitations effectively dealt with the next simple aspect of N2O that needs to be accepted is that as long as you have a pair of working fuel and N2O solenoids delivering the goods to the engine, with a bottle of N2O delivering LIQUID to the system, then other vehicle components such as coils and leads etc., or head gaskets and valves etc. can be the only reason for failure to produce extra power. It's that simple ! Now many readers will be surprised to see ignition parts included in this statement, but the ignition system which includes coils and leads on most of today's cars and motorcycles are barely adequate to fire a standard inlet charge effectively, never mind a charge at the higher pressures caused by injecting N2O. However it is easy to understand that as the pre-combustion chamber pressures rise due to higher volumes of inlet charge, the spark strength required to jump a fixed plug gap is also going to rise. Therefore at some point on the pressure / power scale the available strength from a standard ignition is going to be inadequate, at which point the spark is suppressed until the pressure falls to the level when it can jump the plug gap, and consequently fires so retarded that no power increase is felt from the Nitrous. It should now be obvious that a special ignition system that can deal with the special requirements of N2O injection would be more beneficial to the reliability of the engine than improved engine components (in most instances).
An ignition that combines a stronger spark, with an ability to switch from one advance curve in standard mode to a retarded curve in Nitrous mode would solve most reliability problems in one unit.
To put these ideas into a practical application lets take a stock GSXR 1100 and a Golf GTI as examples and consider their original component designs and quality to determine their suitability for use with Nitrous;
I) combustion chamber layout (4 valve centre plug) perfect for use with Nitrous, very efficient air flow, and even flame spread,
ii) piston design and quality (high quality almost flat top design) very suitable for Nitrous, especially if forged,
iii) exhaust system very restrictive due to noise legislation and will limit the maximum power capability of a Nitrous system, and will reduce the level of any power output by a small amount, but it will still allow enough exhaust gases out to give the owner the buzz of a life time,
iv) ignition system, should handle enough Nitrous to give you the buzz level required, (in the region of 50 bhp), but this will almost certainly be the first limiting factor in your search for the ultimate power output. With the above in mind I would have no doubts that any good condition GSXR 1100 or Golf GTi in totally standard trim would safely handle a 50 bhp increase in power from a HIGHPOWER nitrous system (this does not mean that other Nitrous systems will reliably deliver the same increase).
If a high performance ignition system, a set of performance leads and coil/s were fitted plus a suitable free flowing exhaust, the power limit would double, but you would have great difficulty using it without traction problems, but add a POWAMAX DIGITAL and you have a more useable 100 bhp and the limit rises to 150 bhp or more, now that gives a BUZZZZZZ. Having proven that the extreme claims for Nitrous oxide injection are well founded, lets get back to reality, in the real world it's difficult to use such huge power increases, even on a drag strip, so the most important factor in making more power, is how well it can be used.
Instantaneous power of the type produced by a basic crude Nitrous systems, is the hardest form of power to use, slightly easier to use is the more progressive delivery but relatively uncontrollable power of a turbo, or radical normally aspirated engine, but by far the most useable power can be delivered by an electronically controlled and user programmable Nitrous system such as the HIGHPOWER POWAMAX DIGITAL unit. This unit gives the user total control over maximum and minimum power levels, also the time taken to build up from min to max power, plus precise control over when the system is initially activated to prevent aggravating wheel spin or wheelies.
After a few test runs to dial in the settings to optimum, it should be possible for a good rider / driver to produce the quickest possible acceleration times consistently, unlike the situation when trying to use other forms of power. This quantum leap in Nitrous technology is achieved by pulsing the control solenoids on and off, instead of keeping them open for the duration of the run. By altering the 'ON' to 'OFF' time ratio, known as pulse width modulation, the flow through the system can be made to increase linked to time, as is the case with the POWAMAX DIGITAL. At the minimum level the solenoids are more closed than open, whilst at the maximum setting the solenoids stop pulsing and switch full on. At present the build up of power is linear, but prototypes are in use which can deliver a user adjustable power curve which can be tailored to produce power more suited to an engines maximum potential capability, the end result being that an engine should be able to produce its maximum power capacity at ALL rpm levels, rather than over a narrow peak power band as is the case at present. Now in theory we have a perfect power source but in the real world things are never that simple, because as with all things of this earth (that I know of ) Nitrous oxide is affected by heat. For practical and convenient use, Nitrous oxide (which is a gas at room temperature and pressure) is squeezed into a small cylinder to fit to your bike or car. At normal room temperature approx. 100 times the cylinder volume of Nitrous gas is pumped into the cylinder and held in liquid form under vapour pressure at approx. 800 psi, effectively you are carrying 100 cylinders of Nitrous gas, when you have a full cylinder of Nitrous liquid. Back to the heat, on a cold day the gas contracts and the pressure can drop to zero under extreme conditions, whilst on a hot day or in a hot foreign country it can rise to 1500 psi.
Luckily the UK. is not normally subjected to such wild variations in temperature, otherwise the use of Nitrous oxide would be far more complicated than the simple systems we have now, also we are lucky in as much as Nitrous is tolerant of quite a wide fuel to oxygen ratio. In other words an engine will perform quite well even if the settings are not perfect, therefore if a system is set up correctly and safely (too rich) on a cool day, when it will only perform modestly compared with the heat of a summers day when it will perform impressively but still be safe. Now this is quite acceptable for road use, but for competition use especially in bracket classes you need more precision. This precision can be achieved in a number of ways, but the most accurate way is to make sure you maintain constant bottle pressure, regardless of the temperature of the day. Ideally set the fuel to nitrous ratio to be correct on the hottest day of the year, and then boost the cylinder pressure on days when the pressure is low, by either heating the cylinder up, or pumping the cylinder up with regulated nitrogen. Nitrogen is the better method, as it is more accurate, quicker and produces more constant pressures. If you cannot control the cylinder pressure, then the next best method is to monitor cylinder pressure and on cold days increase the nitrous jet size by the percentage of pressure loss from optimum, and on hot days reduce the nitrous jet size by the appropriate percentage.
If you just want to optimise the use of the amount of Nitrous you are burning on a given run, then a fuel pressure regulator can be used to reduce or increase the amount of extra fuel being delivered. Whichever method you use it is vitally important that accurate records are kept and that only small changes are made at any one time. Once an adjustment has been made there are 4 methods of checking the settings,
I) hold the engine at 3,000rpm in neutral and activate the nitrous system (this method is only safe on HIGHPOWER SYSTEMS), and assess the results,
ii) measure the power output increase on a dyno and compare it with the systems power rating,
iii) use a CO meter,
iv) inspect the spark plugs after a run for signs of mixture readings.
So now we have a correct fuel to Nitrous ratio an uprated ignition system with timing retard and everything seems to be fine until you put the engine under load and for some reason the results are less than impressive, what now? Well the usual answer is the clutch plates, because standard clutches are designed with a minimum of excess capacity, that is to say they are only just up to the job of handling the standard power. Here is a cheap and simple cure for motorcycle clutch slip, the reason the clutch cannot handle any more power is that the steel plates are manufactured by stamping them out of sheet metal, and are warped slightly from new, (so don't fit some new ones) take them to an engineering company and have them surface ground by the minimum amount that produces an even surface finish across the whole plate (as Yamaha are doing as standard now), fit a packer behind each clutch spring just thick enough to allow full clutch disengagement and there you have it, a clutch that should handle approx. 30% more power than before and still be light enough to operate without snapping the bones in your wrist. With these limiting factors removed you are now free to experience the power of your Nitrous system in full.

From Superhonda V3.0

Nitrous releases extra air molecules at 572 degrees. Since it releases extra air, you have to compensate for that by adding extra fuel.

1) Dry kit- adds nitrous into the intake pipe and then adds extra fuel pressure for pressure created when the nitrous is flowing. All dry kits except for Venom adds the pressure to the fuel pressure regulator. The Venom kit adds fuel by connecting a wire to each injector harness and pulsing the injectors for longer time. Dry kit nozzle mounting really doesn't matter, but I would stay less then 6" from the throttle body.

2) Wet kit- works just like the dry but there is an extra solenoid that is used for fuel. With the fuel solenoid, the fuel system (typically the fuel rail) is tapped to receive this fuel. The fuel and nitrous are pumped through a nozzle that looks like a Y. Wet kits have the same concept as dry, it is mainly preference. Wet kits need to be close to the throttle body, no more then 4-5" away.

3) Direct port/Plate kit- direct port and plate kits are among the most efficient ways to run nitrous on a Honda. On a direct port kit, you have the same concept/nozzle as the wet kit, but there are 4 of them, one in each intake runner (the area between the intake plenum and the head, tube like areas). The usual minimum shot for a direct port kit is 80-90 shot. All direct port kits must be custom made to fit. Plate kits are pre-made plates that bolt between the intake manifold and the head. Plate kits are limited to the amount of cars they are made for. Plate kits are relatively easy to install.

How much of a shot can I run on my car?
The main restrictions to this are compression ratio and the condition of the motor. The two basic tests to see if the motor is in good shape are a compression and leak down test. I am very conservative to my customers and what I recommend. I would rather see a person with 10 less horsepower and an intact motor. If the motor as a lower compression motor (accords, b18bs, etc) then I would recommend no more then a 65 shot with just running colder plugs. As for higher compression motors, such as B18cs, H22as, I wouldn't recommend over a 65 shot with extensive fuel and ignition upgrades.

What upgrades to I need for my motor?
The following is a list of what I recommend in order of importance.
1) Colder plugs. I personally like Zex plugs, but if you plan to run NGK, autolite, etc, then go around 2 heat ranges cooler.
2) Retard the timing. On OBD1 cars (pre 96) this is easy, simply get a timing gun and retard the distributor 2 degrees for 50-65 shot, 3 for 70-85 shot, 4 for 90-105 shot and so on. On OBD2 cars, this is harder. You cannot simply turn the distributor and retard the timing, there has to be a service connector to do so. I believe this is a bad way to do it since you throw the ECU into loop mode. The correct way would be listed in number 4.
3) Purge kit. Purge kits give you a better off the line take off by clearing out warm nitrous and air bubbles. The purge kit also acts as a safety, so when you shut the bottle off, you can release all the pressure out of the line, this will save the life of your solenoids.
4) Fuel pressure regulator and pressure gauge. B&M kits are good investments and they are cheap. Adding more fuel pressure will give you better fuel flow.
5) Ignition, MSD blaster coil, cap converter and ignition box. I prefer the MSD 6 digital +. This ignition comes with an extra wire and is tapped into your switch 12volt source. When the switch is activated, the ignition picks up this signal and retards the timing for you.
6) Larger injectors- this also adds to your increased fuel flow. After these you can go lower compression piston/rod combos, block guards, re-sleeving, better clutches, whatever you pocket can handle. With the more precautions you take, the more nitrous you can run and the safer you will be.

How long can I run Nitrous?

Typically y



 
DTL504 
Senior Member
Posts: 736
DTL504
Loc: Fort Rucker, AL
Reg: 07-22-02
Re: Probably a dumb question
05-16-04 05:14 AM - Post#335661    
    In response to JungleJim

RING END GAP CLEARANCE

The piston ring's end gap can have a significant effect on an engine's horsepower output. Rings are available both in standard gap sets, and in special "file fit" sets. The file fit sets allows the engine builder to tailor the ring end gaps to each individual cylinder. Ring gaps should be set differently dependent upon the vehicles use, within the range of .003" (for the 2nd. ring) to .004" (for the top ring) per inch of cylinder diameter. The more severe the use, the greater the required end gap (assuming the use of similar fuels and induction systems). Engines having low operating temperatures, such as those in marine applications is too small. The chart below is a general guideline for cylinders with a 4.00" bore, adjust the figures to match your engine's cylinder diameter:

Top Rings (ductile iron, 4" bore)

Supercharged

Nitromethane .022 - .024"

Alcohol .018 - .020"

Gasoline .022 - .024"

Normally Aspirated - Gasoline

Street, Moderate Performance .016 - .018"

Drag Racing, Oval Track .018 - .020"

Nitrous Oxide - Street .024 - .026"

Nitrous Oxide - Drag .032 - .034"

2nd Rings (plain iron, 4" bore)

Supercharged

Nitromethane .014 - .016"

Alcohol .012 - .014"

Gasoline .012 - .014"

Normally Aspirated - Gasoline

Street, Moderate Performance .010 - .012"

Oval Track .012 - .014"

Pro Stock, Comp. .012 - .014"

Nitrous Oxide - Street .018 - .020"

Nitrous Oxide - Drag .024 - .026"

INSTALLATION NOTES -

CYLINDER WALL FINISH

When installing new rings, the single greatest concern is the cylinder wall condition and finish. If the cylinders are not properly prepared, the rings will not be able to perform as designed. The use of a torque plate, head gasket, and corresponding bolts are necessary to simulate the stress that the cylinder head will put on the block. Main bearing caps should also be torqued in place. The correct procedure has three steps. First the cylinder is bored to approximately .003" less than the desired final size. Next it is rough honed within .0005" of the final diameter. Then a finer finish hone is used to produced the desired "plateau" wall texture. Use a 280 - 400 grit stone to finish cylinder walls for Plasma Moly rings.

Note - the "grit" number we are referring to is a measurement of roughness, it is not the manufacturers stone part number (a Sunnen CK-10 automatic hone stone set #JHU-820 is 400 grit). The cylinder bores should be thoroughly scrubbed with soap and hot water and then oiled before piston and ring installation.

Piston ring grooves are also sealing surfaces, and must be clean, smooth and free of defects. Ring side clearance, measured between the ring and the top of the groove, should be between, .001" and .004".


84 Z28
Dart SBC 400
Scat 4340 Crank, Wiseco Piston, Eagle 6"H-Beam Rod, Bullet Solid Cam 275/279,247/251@.050, 565/577-108, AFR-195 Comp, Hooker Super Comp 1-3/4 Headers, Pro-Built 700R4, P.T.C. 3000SS, Strange ENG.12 Bolt 3:73, Pro-System XC Carb


 
Anonymous 

Re: nitrous info / answers
09-22-05 04:48 AM - Post#335662    
    In response to jamiem

Can anyone tell me how it's possibly even close to being safe to run a DRY nitrous setup?

Wouldn't that give you an instant lean situation causing problems like BOOM BOOM?



 
RickWI 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 1669

Loc: Madison, WI
Reg: 10-08-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
09-22-05 01:53 PM - Post#335663    
    In response to DatsunV8

On a dry kit, which is for EFI applications, additional fuel is fed through the injectors via an increase in fuel pressure upon activation.

70 SS Camaro, Dart Aluminum SmBlk 454 CI, 125 MPH (on the motor) in the quarter and 18 MPG on Power Tour


 
Suburbazine 
Contributor
Posts: 508
Suburbazine
Loc: Baton Rouge, LA
Reg: 01-12-06
Re: nitrous info / answers
01-17-06 07:38 AM - Post#335664    
    In response to RickWI

Got a couple of questions.

I realize nitrous is more commonly seen on cars than trucks, but would it be worth it to install a system on my Tahoe? Will there be a severe engine life loss or powertrain failure with a 50-100HP boost? And if I were to get it, how much should I expect to pay?

2002 Tahoe 5.7L Full Forged 12.5:1 DCR
EPS Tune
Some Sort of Exhaust
A Small Cam
Heads Ported/Polished/Milled Some Thousandths
4L80E swap
Circle-D Pro III 258mm 3B Converter


 
67chevy 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 1228
67chevy
Loc: hertford, N.C, U.S.A
Reg: 06-27-01
Re: nitrous info / answers
12-12-06 12:33 PM - Post#335665    
    In response to Suburbazine

not sure on the prices but you can put a 50 shot on a stock v8 and as long as the timing issues and fuel requirements are taken care of it will last a long time. that is only assuming this will be used once every week or two. ive seen 150 shots on hypereutectic pistons (on engines at about 350 hp) last a long time. when you get into the 500hp range or higher, just as all of the advice i have gotten from CT, you will run into problems quick. cracked pistons are the norm for high hp plus nitrous engine equipped with cast pistons.

67



 
sc15pro 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 94
sc15pro
Age: 48
Loc: indiana
Reg: 08-14-10
08-19-10 01:02 PM - Post#1963501    
    In response to 67chevy

A kid on dyno days on a ss cobalt stock ran a 75 hp shot and in the end it gave him 50 hp at the wheels and the tuner said it was more then safe.



 
Redchevy90 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 49

Age: 35
Loc: Porterville Ca
Reg: 08-09-11
08-18-11 01:02 PM - Post#2127369    
    In response to PhatOne

What about running nitrous on automatic trans(700R)?
Do you just let off the button when you shift, how does that work?

Take care of your truck and it takes care of you


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"3rd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 4332
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
09-14-16 01:51 AM - Post#2651221    
    In response to Redchevy90

Hi Anonymous, The pertinent question among all this enormous amount of valid information should be "Is Nos the cost effective answer to what I want?".
You are going to be classified according to what you run and you won't fool many at the strip about what you are running.
If you only run infrequently then Nos is usually cost effective, but if you run every weekend during the season the consumables running costs get steep.
Mechanical supercharging becomes more cost effective although it will be initially more expensive.
If you just want to surprise a few folks at the lights then Nos is the answer. Just don't get addicted to using it.
The best advice I could give you is - you don't build supercharged engines, you build supercharged cars. Nos is a chemical form of supercharging.
Cheers Kiwi

48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars.

"They made a desert and called it peace." Tacitus


 
55chevy383 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1447
55chevy383
Age: 50
Loc: Noble, Ok.
Reg: 12-08-05
11-30-16 07:13 AM - Post#2663878    
    In response to Redchevy90

  • Redchevy90 Said:
What about running nitrous on automatic trans(700R)?
Do you just let off the button when you shift, how does that work?



Most usual set ups are activated by a WOT (wide open throttle) switch, so there is no button to hold while driving. It activates at wide open throttle and disengages once you let off the throttle.

Phil

11.22 @ 117 N/A.
Phil's '55


 




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