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Username Post: Folded Fender Corner        (Topic#364829)
Stickdude 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 73
Stickdude
Loc: Wyoming
Reg: 07-29-17
04-05-21 04:37 AM - Post#2817505    

What is the best way to straighten the folded corner of this 1952 Chevy Sedan front fender? It is folded over 120° or more and has a 90° lip under that. My first thoughts are to grab it with some pliers and start pulling but I would appreciate some advice which might save me some unintended consequences.


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wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15083

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
04-05-21 07:36 PM - Post#2817545    
    In response to Stickdude

A hammer and dolly is your best bet. Pliers would do it, but would cause secondary damage. If you don’t have a body hammer and a dolly you can use a block of wood and a rubber mallet. Hold the block or dolly on the outside of the fender in the area just where the metal starts to roll and hammer the bent over metal in the direction you need it to go. The block will keep the metal in that area from moving while the hammer moves the metal you want to move. Once the metal starts to move you’ll get a better idea of where to hammer and where to place the dolly (block). When the metal gets closer to where it is supposed to be, there will probably be a high spot where the metal rolled over. That will need to be metal worked with a hammer and dolly and may even need to be shrunk as the metal stretched as it bent over.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
Stickdude 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 73
Stickdude
Loc: Wyoming
Reg: 07-29-17
04-06-21 05:31 AM - Post#2817569    
    In response to wagonman100

Thanks. I do have a cheap hammer and dolly set. I have found that even though I watch videos and such about body work I tend to do more damage than good, or so it seems, when I get a hammer in my hand. This metal is thick and tough to bend but I'll give it a try.



 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15083

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
04-06-21 02:02 PM - Post#2817602    
    In response to Stickdude

You can also push up on the bent down portion with the dolly and hammer on the area where the metal rolls over, but that can cause more damage on the outside of the panel if you don’t have experience doing metal work. I recommend using a rubber mallet if you hammer up the bent over portion and hold the dolly on the outside. It will cause less damage as it spreads the force over a larger area. Try to strike it so that the edge portion of the fender that is supposed to be a 90 degree angle stays that way or that you don’t hammer it over on itself. As the fender comes back into shape you will see the pucker where the 90 degree bend is start to flatten out to where it belongs. Don’t try to flatten the pucker all the way until you are very close to back to the shape you need. If you flatten it back to the 90 and you have to move the metal again, it will disrupt the 90 degree bend and you’ll have to flatten it out again afterward. Look up some YouTube videos on hammer and dollying bends like this one and you will get a good idea how to do it. Provided there are videos out there for a similar type of damage.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
51 AD 3100 
Contributor
Posts: 161

Age: 53
Loc: Grant, AL
Reg: 08-30-20
04-07-21 02:00 AM - Post#2817630    
    In response to Stickdude

turn that over on a solid base and use a dead blow hammer to get the bent part started,then go to hammer and dolly. you have to undo what has been done . doesnt look like theres any crease that formed in the damage so it should be a little time and patience. do you have the other one off the car ? set it side by side so you can see where the contours should be . work the piece slowly all over so it doesnt distort it . you'll get it. i pulled damage much worse than that out of my 51 chevy 3100 fender. it had a tear in the metal too, but it worked out and i had to patch it .


Life's more fun, in a '51


Edited by 51 AD 3100 on 04-07-21 02:01 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Stickdude 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 73
Stickdude
Loc: Wyoming
Reg: 07-29-17
04-12-21 03:15 AM - Post#2817890    
    In response to 51 AD 3100

Thanks to both of you for the advice. I think I'm going to work on that today. I'll post the results, maybe, lol.



 
Stickdude 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 73
Stickdude
Loc: Wyoming
Reg: 07-29-17
04-13-21 07:01 AM - Post#2817951    
    In response to Stickdude

I got it. I started with a 2x4 and a rubber mallet. Using the 2x4 against the 90° gave it some protection. Then I used the 2x4 as a dolly until I got it straight enough to use my hammer and dolly tools. It came out pretty good, IMHO. I also straightened out some other damage on the top of both fenders that was caused when I hit a deer and the hood flew up, damaging the tops of the fenders, the hood, and took out the windshields. Thanks for the advice guys.

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