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Username Post: Toe In on a 57 Chevy        (Topic#363041)
4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4725

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
10-24-20 06:56 AM - Post#2806086    

I'm replacing the steering arms on my 57. Also the tie rod ends (because I used a pickle fork to unloose them from the steering arms) Also new tie rod adjusting sleeves. All from a sponsor here.
Then Everything will have been replaced!

Will simply counting threads as the parts come off and reinstalling the new parts the same amount keep me in the ballpark of alignment so I can get it to the alignment shop?

I read somewhere about a long stick and checking to make sure the side to side of the rear and front of the tire measurment are the same. Will that help? Thanks



I'd rather be thorough than vague


 


acardon 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11458
acardon
Loc: DFW TEXAS
Reg: 03-25-05
10-24-20 01:07 PM - Post#2806109    
    In response to 4dr 57

Counting threads won't work if your changing parts. It might work if your reinstalling the same parts. The long stick or tape measure is a better way to get it to the alignment shop.

Don
66 Corvair (driving)
57 2dr HT (driving)
56 2dr HT (waiting to be restored)


 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15003

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
10-24-20 01:17 PM - Post#2806110    
    In response to 4dr 57

The easiest and fastest way to check toe in is to point the front wheels straight (visually check to see if both look like they are both pointing straight), pick a tread to measure to (the same tread on each tire), and measure to that tread straight across as high up as you can on the front of the tire and as high up as you can on the rear of the tire. The front measurement should be slightly smaller than the rear measurement. You can also mark the tire with chalk around the circumference to give a visual reference where to take your measurement.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4725

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
10-25-20 05:31 AM - Post#2806141    
    In response to acardon


Thank You Very Much acardon



I'd rather be thorough than vague


 
4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4725

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
10-25-20 05:35 AM - Post#2806142    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
The easiest and fastest way to check toe in is to point the front wheels straight (visually check to see if both look like they are both pointing straight), pick a tread to measure to (the same tread on each tire), and measure to that tread straight across as high up as you can on the front of the tire and as high up as you can on the rear of the tire. The front measurement should be slightly smaller than the rear measurement. You can also mark the tire with chalk around the circumference to give a visual reference where to take your measurement.



Thanks wagonman100 the only problem I see here is that the car is off the ground on jackstands and it sounds like this method id for a car sitting on a rack.
I will consider the method described censored workable for either application unless you think differently in which case I will resort to the stick method.
Stanley




I'd rather be thorough than vague


 
acardon 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11458
acardon
Loc: DFW TEXAS
Reg: 03-25-05
10-25-20 05:56 AM - Post#2806144    
    In response to 4dr 57

The wheels have to be supported with the full weight of the car to measure alignment. I use ramps.

Don
66 Corvair (driving)
57 2dr HT (driving)
56 2dr HT (waiting to be restored)


 
4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4725

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
10-25-20 02:30 PM - Post#2806178    
    In response to acardon

  • acardon Said:
The wheels have to be supported with the full weight of the car to measure alignment. I use ramps.





Personally I can not wait to put these new steering arms and sleeves on after finding one shot and the other worn badly; finish up and complete my disc brake experiment, for better or worse or no change at all, and get her back on the pavement where she belongs!!



I'd rather be thorough than vague


 
YOUNG57 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1299

Loc: Tennessee
Reg: 12-06-10
10-26-20 06:47 PM - Post#2806299    
    In response to 4dr 57

The best and most accurate way to set the (near) correct toe-in is to compare the difference between the front and rear of the two front tires. With the front tires off the ground use a pointed object to scribe a line on a flat smooth area of the tread of each front tire while rotating it to make a visible line all the way around.

Then with the weight of the car on the front tires measure the distance between the front and rear scribe lines near half the height of the tires.

With radial tires the front measurement should be 1/8” less than the rear (toe-in).

That will be close enough to get you to the alignment shop.




 
Shepherd 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 2227

Loc: Lake George, NY
Reg: 11-11-15
10-27-20 04:27 AM - Post#2806315    
    In response to YOUNG57

I've done it this way for years, I use furniture movers under the tires so the suspension settles.



 
YOUNG57 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1299

Loc: Tennessee
Reg: 12-06-10
10-28-20 02:38 PM - Post#2806415    
    In response to Shepherd

Sheppard, you’re correct, I forgot. If you just set the car down on it tires, they will have hoisted angularity. I roll the car back and forward a few feet a few times for the tires to regain their normal stance before measuring toe-in.



 
PRL 
Newbie
Posts: 2

Reg: 10-22-20
10-28-20 07:38 PM - Post#2806453    
    In response to YOUNG57

I have a similar with alignment. I put 2" dropped spindles on my 57 Belair and tried to get it aligned they said they could not set the toe-in because it did bot have adjutable A-arms. I assume I cannot put a vertical level against the tires and measure the difference at the top or bottom.



 
Shepherd 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 2227

Loc: Lake George, NY
Reg: 11-11-15
10-29-20 04:37 AM - Post#2806473    
    In response to PRL

Something wrong here, toe is not set by the control arms, the steering tie rods handle this.



 
docjns1 
"2nd Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 159
docjns1
Loc: upstate NY
Reg: 11-12-19
10-29-20 03:40 PM - Post#2806531    
    In response to PRL

adjustable control arms and or level vertically on wheels would be measuring camber (and possibly caster to some degree...pun intended), not toe-in.

that said, on my 65 and those with a 'strut arm/rod' for caster adjustment will affect camber and toe when changed

Steve
*********
'65 Impala SS, Crocus Yellow/blk
327 / 300 L74
M11 3 on the tree
12 bolt 3.31 open dif


Edited by docjns1 on 10-29-20 03:41 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
YOUNG57 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1299

Loc: Tennessee
Reg: 12-06-10
11-02-20 06:17 AM - Post#2806832    
    In response to Shepherd

Yes, something is wrong with that alignment guy.

Unless part of the frame was cut off and something else welded on, the upper control arms are mounted to the frame with two bolts each and adding and removing shims between the frame and the control arm pivot shaft at these bolts changes camber and caster (only, not toe-in).

Removing shims from both bolts decreases camber, moving shims from the rear bolt to the front one decreases caster.




 
Shepherd 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 2227

Loc: Lake George, NY
Reg: 11-11-15
11-02-20 06:23 AM - Post#2806833    
    In response to YOUNG57

Correct



 


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