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Username Post: No brakes at one wheel!!!        (Topic#359822)
96bliss 
Senior Member
Posts: 285
96bliss
Loc: SoCal
Reg: 11-03-05
02-15-20 04:42 PM - Post#2786593    

on my '65 bone stock 2dr. Noticed that the car has been pulling to the right for a while so I decided to bleed the brakes. Get to the drivers front and no fluid coming out of the bleed screw. Was doing the bleeding the old fashioned way with my son depressing the brake pedal then tried the vacuum tool by trying to pull the fluid from the bleed screw. Nothing. Checked the short metal tube and the rubber hose and they look fine. Lifted that corner of the car and spun the wheel. Told my son to hit the brake and nothing. Brakes not even engaging.
So where do I go from here? Pull the brake piston? Disconnect the rubber hose to see if fluid comes out? I'm open to suggestions.

96 Impala SS BBB - bone stock 65 Impala 2dr HT - mostly original


 


Crusty66 
"7th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 381
Crusty66
Age: 60
Loc: Albany, eNZed
Reg: 11-04-12
02-15-20 05:31 PM - Post#2786599    
    In response to 96bliss

Disconnect the steel pipe where it connects to the rubber brake hose, press gently on the brake pedal to see if fluid comes out.

If fluid comes out, you most probably have a blocked hose.

If no fluid, trace the pipe back to the master cylinder looking to see if has been crushed or pinched

Steve
1966 Caprice 396 496 496mkII TH400


 
Motown_mtrhd 
Poster
Posts: 76
Motown_mtrhd
Age: 67
Loc: Grand Blanc Mich
Reg: 12-22-15
02-15-20 07:10 PM - Post#2786607    
    In response to 96bliss

Yep I'm with 96 Bliss. you either have a smashed tube somewhere or the flex hose is swelled closed, how old are the hoses? more than 5 years I would just replace them.

Steve, 65 SS numbers 396,TH400 A/C Lots of power options. 1970 Chevelle, LS-LQ9 Tremec 5 spd,nuthin stock left. Drop Top . 34 Chevy 350 TPI,38 Chevy coupe.


 
96bliss 
Senior Member
Posts: 285
96bliss
Loc: SoCal
Reg: 11-03-05
02-16-20 11:32 AM - Post#2786653    
    In response to Motown_mtrhd

The hoses are at least 14 years old, possibly the original ones since I'm not sure if the previous owner ever changed them.
What about the wheel cylinder? Could there be a problem with it?

96 Impala SS BBB - bone stock 65 Impala 2dr HT - mostly original


 
jayoldschool 
Newbie
Posts: 28

Reg: 09-03-18
02-16-20 05:25 PM - Post#2786682    
    In response to 96bliss

Certainly. Pull the drum, there could be leaking fluid inside it. Peel the rubber back on the cylinder, it should be bone dry.

After you figure it out, convert the single pot master to the 67 Impala dual master. Much, much safer. I've converted both my 65s (Impala and C10). BOTH had brake failures that were close calls. On the C10, I lost a wheel cylinder and ended up in the field next to my house. On my Impala, the master failed, and leaked so slowly down the booster I never saw it. It finally ran out just as I pulled in the garage. Bang, I drove right into my tire rack. Thankfully the bumper perfectly aligned with the bottom row of tires!

If you want more info on the conversion, LMK. Done correctly, it looks stock (but with a factory dual master).

Jason

65 Impala convertible 327/250 Maderia Maroon/black California black plate car


 
japete92 
"6th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1319
japete92
Loc: No. Virginia
Reg: 01-18-13
02-16-20 07:18 PM - Post#2786689    
    In response to jayoldschool

The wheel cylinder is among the first things I would inspect. It surely MAY be the problem.

I agree the dual master cylinder is a good idea, it's a useful risk reducer. Especially for anyone who doesn't wish to take the time to perform periodic inspections.

I've logged MANY thousands of miles on single master cylinder cars w/o EVER having a failure. BUT, I was always under the hood, or under the car, checking something. Heck, the attendant who pumped your gas always offered to 'check under the hood' for you (especially the pretty girls; who also had very dirty windshields to clean ).

Did I ever find a leak? Or some anomaly? Sure, but fixed them before the brakes become dysfunctional. Those 'old' systems need attention. They can not be neglected w/o risk.

If one allows a slow leak to empty the cylinder, their neglect is the cause of any problems they have. And, there's a 'mechanical' brake that doesn't rely on the hydraulics at all that's available for emergency use (unless that's neglected too).





Edited by japete92 on 02-16-20 07:21 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
96bliss 
Senior Member
Posts: 285
96bliss
Loc: SoCal
Reg: 11-03-05
02-17-20 09:09 AM - Post#2786717    
    In response to jayoldschool

So here is my plan. I'd like to disconnect the rubber hose at the wheel cylinder and confirm fluid flow. If there is none, then the problem lies upstream from there. If there IS fluid flow, then I remove the drum and replace the wheel cylinder.

One question I have is how do I unscrew the rubber hose from the wheel cylinder when the other end is screwed into the fitting that joins it into the metal tube? Won't I be limited as to how much I can unscrew the rubber hose at the wheel cylinder due to the restriction of trying to twist the hose while it is connected/fixed to the fitting that connects the hose to the metal tube???

96 Impala SS BBB - bone stock 65 Impala 2dr HT - mostly original


Edited by 96bliss on 02-17-20 09:25 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
jktucker92 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 355
jktucker92
Loc: West Richland, WA
Reg: 02-05-17
02-17-20 12:34 PM - Post#2786729    
    In response to 96bliss

You're correct that you won't be able to unscrew the hose at the wheel cylinders. Some cars use a banjo bolt at the wheel cylinder, but not ours. You'll have to disconnect it at the hard line at the top of the hose. If you have fluid coming out there, you can then remove the bracket that holds the top of the hose on, then you'll be able to unscrew the hose from the wheel cylinder. At that point, you can re-connect it to the rubber hose for your check.



 
96bliss 
Senior Member
Posts: 285
96bliss
Loc: SoCal
Reg: 11-03-05
02-17-20 02:53 PM - Post#2786737    
    In response to jktucker92

Actually, once I have the hose off, can I just check it by trying to blow air through it instead of re-connecting it to see if its clogged (wiping off any brake fluid before putting my mouth to it of course)?

96 Impala SS BBB - bone stock 65 Impala 2dr HT - mostly original


 
jktucker92 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 355
jktucker92
Loc: West Richland, WA
Reg: 02-05-17
02-17-20 06:25 PM - Post#2786758    
    In response to 96bliss

Yes. I think it's very unlikely that your problem is at the hose. A pinched tube could be the problem, but I think it's more likely an issue with your wheel cylinder. I have had wheel cylinders where the bleed screw wouldn't allow fluid out. In one case, the wheel cylinder was ok, but the bleed screw had plugged up. I just used a nail to dig out the dirt inside, and then I was able to re-use it.



 
96bliss 
Senior Member
Posts: 285
96bliss
Loc: SoCal
Reg: 11-03-05
02-17-20 07:58 PM - Post#2786765    
    In response to jktucker92

I have no brakes at this wheel. Nothing. So I doubt it's a bleed screw. Metal pipe, all 3" of it, is not pinched or kinked.

96 Impala SS BBB - bone stock 65 Impala 2dr HT - mostly original


 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3266

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
02-18-20 04:13 PM - Post#2786804    
    In response to 96bliss

If you don't know how old the hoses are, then they should be replaced. Make your life easy, and cut the rubber hoses in half before you try to unscrew them. Less chance that you will damage the steel line in the process.
Remove the two front wheels and drums, and inspect the brake cylinders for leakage, and the linings for wear. Some hoses are difficult to remove from the cylinder, and you need to remove the cylinder to remove the hose, so you should be prepared to do a complete brake overhaul. Do only one side at a time, so you have the other side for reference if you forget how something goes together. I like doing brakes outside, where I can spray them down with a solution of dish washing liquid and water, and then hose off before starting the job. I also use a cheap bristle paint brush to "scrub" down all the springs and hardware, so everything is clean before I start.
If you are going to do a complete brake job, including wheel cylinder rebuilding / replacement, hoses, etc., consider converting the entire system over to silicone brake fluid. It costs more, but you eliminate brake fluid changes every 3 or 4 years. Silicone brake fluid never absorbs water, like the way that conventional brake fluid will.
Don't forget to do the hose over the rear differential.
Bad steering and brakes can lead you into a pole or tree, and a bad engine or transmission will leave you stranded at the side of the road. Brakes and steering are the two most important mechanical parts of your vehicle.

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


 
96bliss 
Senior Member
Posts: 285
96bliss
Loc: SoCal
Reg: 11-03-05
02-21-20 08:55 PM - Post#2787025    
    In response to junky

Plugged rubber hose. New hose and problem fixed.
Thanks everyone for your guidance and input.
Riding now with 4 wheels with brakes!

96 Impala SS BBB - bone stock 65 Impala 2dr HT - mostly original


 
Gaspains 
"6th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 339
Gaspains
Loc: Mankato, MN
Reg: 11-23-09
02-22-20 06:38 AM - Post#2787036    
    In response to 96bliss

Thanks for closing the circle. So often hear the problem but not the fix. Glad you’re at 100%.

Kevin
1965 Impala SS Coupe
Regal Red with Black Interior
L74 327
M-20
3.31 Open, 12 bolt

65-66 FSCC #512
NIA #2832


 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3266

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
02-24-20 03:32 PM - Post#2787230    
    In response to 96bliss

Now that you have all 4 wheels working, it is time to change all the rubber hoses, and do a complete brake fluid change. Before you do anything, I would push as hard as you can on the brake pedal, while the car is sitting on a level surface, and it park. This will put a lot of stress on the steel brake lines, and if they are going to fail, they will fail with the car sitting still, rather than on the road while driving. As was said, a single master cylinder is safe as long as you do your maintenance. If you don't know the history of the car, then the best thing to do is pull all 4 wheels, and check the cylinders for leaking and the condition of the linings. It will be time well spent, and you can drive the car knowing that it is safe.

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


 


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