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Username Post: Drum brakes squeaking        (Topic#359593)
USCGMK1 
Contributor
Posts: 150

Loc: Vicksburg, Mississippi
Reg: 07-24-15
01-25-20 07:47 PM - Post#2785173    

So, today I got a new set of 17 inch torq thrusters and tires on my 64 Impala. On the way home I noticed that when I turn slightly to the right for a curve in the road or turning right at a stop sign it makes a squeak squeak squeak sound, it doesn't do it when its going straight, or turning to the left or left for a curve. What makes me think it's the brakes is I found out that when I hit the brake, it goes away, but as soon as I release the brake it squeaks again. I also swerved the car left and right and it does only going right. But the brakes stop just fine. It didn't have the squeaking problem with the stocks steel wheels.

Also a few months back at Cruising the Coast when I would go by the concrete barricades in the center of the road I could hear a tick tick tick sound echoing off of the barricade but as soon as I was away from it I couldn't hear it anymore and there was no squeaking then. I'm not sure if that has anything to do with my current problem, but I figured I'd throw that in.

I plan on checking out the whole front end next weekend, but looking for ideas.



 


junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3266

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
01-25-20 08:18 PM - Post#2785179    
    In response to USCGMK1

Your drums could be flexing as a result of the tension of the larger wheel. I would take the wheel off, and look for a wear spot on the drum or the rim. Something has to be rubbing on something else to make the squeal.

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


 
USCGMK1 
Contributor
Posts: 150

Loc: Vicksburg, Mississippi
Reg: 07-24-15
01-25-20 08:36 PM - Post#2785181    
    In response to junky

Thank you for the reply. I've been googling and it seems the only thing I can find is with disc brakes. Hopefully it's something easy or cheap.



 
japete92 
"6th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1320
japete92
Loc: No. Virginia
Reg: 01-18-13
01-26-20 09:34 AM - Post#2785203    
    In response to USCGMK1

  • USCGMK1 Said:
So, today I got a new set of 17 inch torq thrusters and tires on my 64 Impala. On the way home I noticed that when I turn slightly to the right for a curve in the road or turning right at a stop sign it makes a squeak squeak squeak sound, it doesn't do it when its going straight, or turning to the left or left for a curve. What makes me think it's the brakes is I found out that when I hit the brake, it goes away, but as soon as I release the brake it squeaks again. I also swerved the car left and right and it does only going right. But the brakes stop just fine. It didn't have the squeaking problem with the stocks steel wheels.

Also a few months back at Cruising the Coast when I would go by the concrete barricades in the center of the road I could hear a tick tick tick sound echoing off of the barricade but as soon as I was away from it I couldn't hear it anymore and there was no squeaking then. I'm not sure if that has anything to do with my current problem, but I figured I'd throw that in.

I plan on checking out the whole front end next weekend, but looking for ideas.



Not saying this is your problem but:

"Ticking" MAY indicate an axle bearing problem. A wheel/tire with a different geometry (moving the center of gravity outboard from where GM put it) may place a little more stress on the bearings (and other parts) especially during the dynamics of a turn. One side of the suspension may be in better shape than the other and is handling the stress better.

I don't remember ever hearing bearings 'squeak', but bushing do. And using 'wide' tires/wheels introduces moment arms that OEM parts do not. In your case, is it enough to cause your 'squeak'? Don't know. Possibly.

A static inspection may not show all that is going on dynamically; the forces increase significantly. Parts connected via bushings that seem to be in 'alignment' in a static condition may not stay that way when the dynamic forces are applied. You may see increased wear.

Just some 'ideas' as requested.

Pete










 
USCGMK1 
Contributor
Posts: 150

Loc: Vicksburg, Mississippi
Reg: 07-24-15
01-26-20 09:43 AM - Post#2785204    
    In response to japete92

Thank you for the ideas. I’ve got new-ish bearings/hub from CPP, but I’ll definitely check both sides to ensure, pretty much everything is new under the front end but as I’ve learned even new stuff goes bad.



 
japete92 
"6th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1320
japete92
Loc: No. Virginia
Reg: 01-18-13
01-26-20 10:43 AM - Post#2785211    
    In response to USCGMK1

  • USCGMK1 Said:
Thank you for the ideas. I’ve got new-ish bearings/hub from CPP, but I’ll definitely check both sides to ensure, pretty much everything is new under the front end but as I’ve learned even new stuff goes bad.



The entire weight of the car is supported by the upward force transmitted to the suspension through the center of gravity of the wheel/tire. As that CG 'moves' (outward as 'width' increases) from where GM engineered the car, forces change.

On a 4000 lb car with 60/40 weight distribution, each inch of change is 1200 inch-lbs of additional torque (from the GM design) on each side of the front end, in the static condition. That does not mean imminent failure (especially in the steel parts) because GM used safety factors in their design. Faster wear should be planned for on the 'soft' parts. An editorial comment; vendors love it because they get to sell more parts.

Just sharing some info.

Pete







 
ragtp66 
Contributor
Posts: 874

Reg: 12-09-07
02-01-20 09:25 PM - Post#2785653    
    In response to USCGMK1

Try using your parking brake as you make the turn and see if you can isolate the problem to front or rear. May also check for a loose wheel weight or just one not stuck on good. They probably used the sticky type as opposed to the rim ones that are hammered on look for a high one or missing/loose. Could swap a different pair of wheels on just to see if it goes away. Possibly a broken spring or hardware on the shoe. Even a dry wheel bearing/ bad tapered bearing might give you a squeak. If the shoes have worn a groove into the backing plate they can get noisy too. A little grease on all the contact points may temporarily quiet it. If there is a groove either replace the backing plate or build it up with some weld and grind it back to flat.

Good Luck let us know what you find.


Toys:
1958 Impala 2dr Hardtop Under Construction
1966 Chevelle Malibu Convert M20/350 Aztec Bronze
1987 Sea Ray Pachanga 22
2002 Cadillac Escalade EXT Parts chaser
2007 Trailblazer SS -gone and missed


 
msp177 
Contributor
Posts: 713

Reg: 02-16-10
02-03-20 03:55 PM - Post#2785808    
    In response to USCGMK1

Did you have those drums turned before you installed the 17 inch wheels?
msp177



 
omarine 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 264
omarine
Loc: San Diego
Reg: 06-29-15
02-04-20 10:25 AM - Post#2785868    
    In response to USCGMK1

this squeak can occur during turns when the drum shifts and rubs up against the backing plate.

it's common to crease an edge of the backing plate when removing a stubborn drum and then a hammer is used to knock it loose from the inboard side, banged outward.

it's simple to fix, just bang it back so that the drum wont rub it - in my case it's the driver rear drum, and it just barely rubs around left turns only...never when going straight

cheers
oscar

61 Impala bubbletop, 283, 2bbl Rochester, generator, points and drum brakes- daily driver
'49 Harley Davidson FL - Panhead


 
USCGMK1 
Contributor
Posts: 150

Loc: Vicksburg, Mississippi
Reg: 07-24-15
02-09-20 09:05 PM - Post#2786213    
    In response to omarine

Sooooo, I went to check it out and I couldn't find anything wrong with it sitting there in the garage. Then I took off down the road and nothing, probably looked like a drunk driver trying to recreate it but no sounds. I went to get the front end aligned (almost impossible to find someone who can do shims) and asked them to check and test drive it, they couldn't find anything wrong.

Well today I decided to check the rear end area and noticed the pass. rear backing plate was super close to the drum, looks like when I had the rear end rebuilt they took a hammer to beat the drum off instead of loosening the shoes. So I took a flathead and bent the plate out as it was right on it. I took the drum off only to find damaged shoes (more money) and the inside of the drums were scored pretty bad.

I'm curious if that could be where the sound was coming from? But like I said it quit after sitting for a week, but I'm still suspicious.

The other thing I found was the drivers side rear spring was not in the correct place on the trailing arm. The end of the spring was sitting nowhere near the spring stop that's on the cup.







 
omarine 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 264
omarine
Loc: San Diego
Reg: 06-29-15
02-10-20 07:17 AM - Post#2786222    
    In response to USCGMK1

i think you found the culprit for squeaking in that drum that the shop beat into submission.

not too sure about the spring, I would have to think about that some more haha.

maybe try addressing that drum first, and see how it sounds / drives..

61 Impala bubbletop, 283, 2bbl Rochester, generator, points and drum brakes- daily driver
'49 Harley Davidson FL - Panhead


 


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