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Username Post: Unbending door-panel stainless trim        (Topic#359525)
dsacton 
"3rd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1211
dsacton
Loc: Boulder, CO
Reg: 11-01-11
01-19-20 07:24 PM - Post#2784694    

Hi folks,

I just finished the door panels of my '54 and now am woking on the rear panels. (If it were a 4-door, they'd be the rear doors, but it's a 2-door, so I guess they are not actually door panels.)

One of the pieces is really bent (dumb move when I was a kid). I am going to straighten it. I was thinking of attaching wooden strips on each side of the bend, and then heating the "elbow" to be red hot and straighten it. Any thoughts on this? Or do you know a better way to unbend it?

Thanks for your help,

Attachment: IMG_5134.JPG (840.48 KB) 4 View(s)


Bent stainless door panel trim


Scott Acton
1954 Chevy Bel Air 2-door
http://www.my54chevy.com


 


cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1185
cbmkr56
Age: 64
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
01-19-20 07:40 PM - Post#2784696    
    In response to dsacton

No heat take a small piece of hardwood or aluminum and form it do do half of the profile so you can move it from side to side. Do this from the back with the finish side on the plate.Lay it on a smooth plate a piece of steel or aluminum and with a small hammer you can tap on the the profile tool and bring it back out where it will look like new. I have done several pieces of stainless that way some bent over 90 degree's.



 
dsacton 
"3rd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1211
dsacton
Loc: Boulder, CO
Reg: 11-01-11
01-19-20 07:54 PM - Post#2784698    
    In response to cbmkr56

Are you saying that I should make a mold of sorts, and hammer it into the mold from the bottom? I'm a bit confused and would welcome any clarificaiton. Thanks

Scott Acton
1954 Chevy Bel Air 2-door
http://www.my54chevy.com


 
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1185
cbmkr56
Age: 64
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
01-20-20 12:47 PM - Post#2784738    
    In response to dsacton

I will take a picture of how to do it and post it.




 
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1185
cbmkr56
Age: 64
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
01-20-20 01:14 PM - Post#2784741    
    In response to dsacton

Hope this helps

Attachment: trim_1.jpg (24.41 KB) 56 View(s)




Attachment: trim2.jpg (2.76 MB) 16 View(s)




Attachment: trim3.jpg (2.51 MB) 7 View(s)






 
Dean50 
"13th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 1440
Dean50
Loc: Detroit area
Reg: 01-02-07
01-20-20 01:53 PM - Post#2784749    
    In response to cbmkr56

That's pretty cool.

Dean50



 
whiskey1954 
"3rd Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 860
whiskey1954
Loc: central north carolina
Reg: 12-07-08
01-20-20 01:58 PM - Post#2784751    
    In response to dsacton

Dsacton: Do not try to straighten it with one blow. You know the deal Love it, massage it, caress it. Like you do your "PETS"



 
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1185
cbmkr56
Age: 64
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
01-20-20 04:07 PM - Post#2784763    
    In response to Dean50

I do a lot of stainless repair on these cars, Windshield center trim from hoods blowing up and sun visor clamps. The front door trim that gets bent by the front fender when the strap breaks.
I have a few special made little tools from 6061 aluminum for certain pcs.
Yes take your time and let the metal help you put it back to where it was.



 
dsacton 
"3rd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1211
dsacton
Loc: Boulder, CO
Reg: 11-01-11
01-20-20 05:37 PM - Post#2784771    
    In response to cbmkr56

OK, I see what you mean. You make a tool (wood or aluminum) to hammer from the back side, against a flat steel surface. But how do you make the initial corrective bend? Mine is bent about 30 degrees.

Thanks for the pictures!

Scott Acton
1954 Chevy Bel Air 2-door
http://www.my54chevy.com


 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3245

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
01-24-20 07:01 AM - Post#2785055    
    In response to dsacton

Very slowly and carefully message it out a little at a time. Patience is the name of the game. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, then send it to someone that does this for a living. It might be money well spent.

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


 
kool53 
Member
Posts: 819

Loc: Mukwonago, WI
Reg: 06-18-04
01-24-20 05:49 PM - Post#2785101    
    In response to junky

Not trying to hi-jack this, but does a shrinking disk have the same effect on stainless as it does on sheet metal? If I wanted to do a little shrinking on some trim, would that work?

Jay


 
eplantage 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 2271

Loc: Southern MN
Reg: 03-15-04
01-27-20 08:32 AM - Post#2785277    
    In response to kool53

I would say no. Polishing them would be a real pain after that. The pieces are not very wide, maybe 3/8". Patience is the key here.

Age: 66 at the moment
1950 Chevrolet Sedan Delivery
1953 BelAir Convertible Project
2002 Heritage Springer FLSTSI
1930 Model A Standard Coupe


 
dsacton 
"3rd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1211
dsacton
Loc: Boulder, CO
Reg: 11-01-11
01-27-20 08:58 PM - Post#2785325    
    In response to junky

Finally got it finished; it is nearly perfect. I ended up building a small jig to keep the non-kinked portions of the strip flat while I worked the bend out. I used heat after all; I am not sure if that was necessary. But I am glad that it had a chance to anneal after bending it back.

I got some brass round stock and made a small chisel-like tool to work the wrinkles out against an aluminum plate the best I could. This seemed to be the perfect material to work the stainless, from the back side. 150 grit sand paper on the polished surface took out what was left. I worked my way up to 2000; I still need to use a buffing wheel.

Working out the dents created a bit of a bow; in hindsight, I wish I had stopped just short of completely unbending the piece, so it would be flat on the whole. But it will straighten itself when finally attached.

Thanks everyone for your help.

Scott Acton
1954 Chevy Bel Air 2-door
http://www.my54chevy.com


 
Lead sled 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1974
Lead sled
Age: 60
Loc: Walton,NY.
Reg: 11-04-09
01-27-20 10:18 PM - Post#2785327    
    In response to dsacton

Glad to here you got everything straightened out . I've had to go thru that bit of bodywork myself.Mine didn't come out "perfect", but all I had to work with, were hardwood dowels,hammers, picks and a whole lot of sanding,and hand polishing. Good enough for me

Late yr model (Dec. 51 BelAir/ 52 trim), with a basically stock 67 Camaro SS350/295hp Turbo Fire Edelbrock 1405, Saginaw 4spd/355 geared 55/6 Chevy rear.2,1st place,and 1 top five award trophies so far
http://www.picturetrail.com/bris51deluxe


 
Joe54 
Newbie
Posts: 5

Loc: Alvarado Texas
Reg: 10-30-19
02-11-20 05:30 AM - Post#2786287    
    In response to Lead sled

WOW!!!
Just watched your picture trail. From what I could tell you did an excellent job!!!




 


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