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Username Post: Grandaddy's 1953 150 2Dr Sedan        (Topic#355913)
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 06:46 AM - Post#2763722    

My Granddaddy, Frank, loved cars. In fact, he loved them so much that he only sold (actually traded away) one car during his 76 years. When he died, he had the following cars around the house:
1937 Chevy Master Deluxe
1950 Chevy 3100 Pickup
1953 Chevy 150
1959 Chevy Belair
1965 Plymouth Belvedere

Not long after Granddaddy passed in 1979, my grandmother and parents gave away the '37 to a relative, the '50 to a great neighbor and the '59 to a junkman. My grandmother, or "Mawmaw" as we called her, gave my bother the '65 Plymouth. And that left me with the '53.

Granddaddy was a jack-of-all trades, and he was good at it. What he wasn't so good at was keeping the '53 pristine. When I got it, the back of the driver's fender was curled like a cinnamon role and secured with a strip of pig-iron to the body, the bumpers were roughed up, the trunk lid and passenger fin resembled snow moguls, and the trunk latch was beaten off its welds and hanging free. The floor pans, no fault of Grandaddy's, were already rusty and he had patched several areas with what I believe was probably scrap sheet metal from a screen-door.

Originally, the car was going to be my first driver, but during the process of working on her, I found damage - mechanical and body-wise - that was outside of my expertise at the time. But I still kept her; I just couldn't stand to part with the last thing I had of my Granddaddy.

I have fond memories of getting the car running (barely) and driving it around the yard - sometimes with brakes, sometimes without. In my teens and early twenties, I slowly accumulated spare parts, mainly through a couple of parts cars (wish I still had them). By the time I had finished accumulating, I had a good inventory of parts to get the old girl on the road.

But then, as usual, life took over and, like a lot of others, I let the old girl sit in that same yard. Over the last few years, I've beaten myself over never doing anything with it (but I have been promising my Mom that I would "eventually" get to it).

Well, after 39 years, eventually is here. I'm going to fix her. The goal is to get rid of all of the rust, update the mechanicals but keep the look of the car such that it would be mistaken for being hot-rodded in the late 50's to early 60's. Eventually, it'll go to one of my kids, so I'm going to document this work for their sake as well.

How she looked on the day that "eventually" got here and we pulled her from her grave:




Stay tuned.....



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 




Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 07:07 AM - Post#2763724    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Step 1 - assess the damage. Oh boy, there's a LOT of it. You already know the bulk of the injuries that Grandaddy inflicted. Now, for the damage that sitting outside in the same yard since 1972 has done:

Floors - front and back - are shot. Ever seen the Flinstones? Yeah, you get the point.

Trunk floor - SHOT. I swear that thing was solid when I last looked at it 25 years ago.

Rockers - amazingly, they look ok on the outside except for some small damage on the passenger side.

Quarters - Uggh, where do I start. The picture above can give the best description. All of the lower rockers have rust AND collision damage.



Trunk tailpan - shot, shot shot.



Doors - The bottoms are bad. Really bad. BUT, amazingly, they line up almost perfectly and close smooth as butter.

Oh, and there's the dent from where someone (probably one of my brothers) attempted to shoot a hole in the ROOF from the INSIDE. Amazingly, it didn't penetrate - but it'll take some work to get that spot unstretched and returned to normal.

And, last but not least, the damage that derailed my original plans for the car to be my first daily driver. Driver's side C-pillar, rust damage underneath the chrome moulding strip.


In addition, there's rust damage to one of the front body braces AND rust damage to the front of the passenger side frame rail.

Stating the obvious but there's a LOT of holes that are supposed to have metal in them......



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Keith_Knox 
Moderator and "17th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 6237
Keith_Knox
Age: 78
Loc: Napa, Ca USA
Reg: 04-02-00
04-06-19 10:08 AM - Post#2763732    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Good luck, with this formattable job.

29-41, 42-48, 49-54 Moderator
1948 Chevy Fleetmaster Coupe Purchased 6/2010. Stock with rebuilt 52 216 installed May 1966.
1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup, stock. Purchased 11/18/17.
2019 Ford Ranger Lariat Super Crew


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 01:04 PM - Post#2763746    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

So here's the start of my plan:

1) Fix the damage. ALL of it
2) Find someone who can help me with #1.

As luck would have it, one of my friends, a fellow car-aholic, has brought up his "metal guy" several times over the past few years. I had seen the result of this man's work, most notably doing the work on my friend's Porsche 911 to delete the sunroof (including welding in the replacement panel). Let me tell you, this guy is GOOD. So I got his number and called him, talked through the basics of the car and my desires for the car, and warned him of the damage. Then I sent him some pics. His response? "Bring it on, I'm not scared".

He did have a few reasonable requests. Empty the car, get the doors working (they weren't opening at the time), get the engine/tranny out and clean the car as much as possible.

The next day, my best friend and I went over and cleaned everything out of car. Then, one of my brothers got out and pressure washed the old girl, inside and out:


Afterwards, we pulled the old engine/tranny. They won't go back in BUT we've already found a new home for them where they will be put to use.



Another of my friends has a car trailer, most importantly one with a winch on it. So we loaded her up and took her over to the metal guy.



Sorry for the sideways pics. I'm new to posting pics.

More later.



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 01:10 PM - Post#2763748    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Here she is at the "metal hospital".


This will be her home until she's healthy again.

And does anyone know why pics that show correctly on your computer load 90 degrees off?



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 01:26 PM - Post#2763749    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

While I'm busy ordering parts, my metal guy goes ahead and establishes a "beachhead" on this island of rust. Specifically, the C-Pillar. I'm at work a few days later, towards the end of the day, and I get these:





Keep in mind that this is only a rough-in. We still have to fit the moulding to see if the contour is spot-on. Fortunately, it doesn't have to be 100% perfect since that moulding will cover it.

But I am STOKED. This was the damage that prevented the car from being my first daily driver and now it is GONE!

That following weekend, I went over to "metal hospital" and did some additional tear-down. Mainly removing the steering column and all of the dash components. Like the engine, they won't be going back in (except for the dash bezel that I'll reuse).

Next up - metal sourcing. Lots and lots of metal sourcing....




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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 01:53 PM - Post#2763753    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Metal sourcing - I've been a member on this forum for a LONG time. Never too active (I'm a major introvert) but have watched lots of projects and kept up with the strings in the 49-54 section. It was here that I learned about EMS Automotive. To get started, I created an itemized list of items that I'd need. I split it into two categories - "Floor Pan" and "Everything Else".

After summing up all the parts that I'd need to reconstruct the floor, I was, shall we say, in a bit of sticker shock. Not saying that the parts aren't worth it BUT it was going to run me around $1,700 to get the separate parts for the floor. At that point, I thought it prudent to shop around some, so I googled "1953 Chevrolet 150 Floor Pan".

And I hit pay dirt. Major pay dirt. One of the first results that popped was a listing on eBay for a complete floor pan. As I was reading through the listing, I found that the seller was a company in Georgia - Jeffords Rods & Rides. So I called them and ended up talking to Andrew, the owner. Super nice guy. I asked him a number of questions about the floor pan, found it really was complete - all braces (outer and mid-floor), all fittings for seats, good gauge sheet metal (not sure if original gauge or not) and coated with weld-through primer. It's built by a company named Golden Star Automotive. The price he quoted me was competitive, so I ordered the pan.

While we were talking, I also asked if he had a trunk pan - and he did. Again, the price was competitive and the description indicated that it was a solid piece, so I ordered that as well. It also turned out that he had a relationship with EMS, so we worked up a quote for all of the other sheet metal that was needed.

A few days later, I made the trek up into North Georgia to Rods & Rides to pick up the pans. Honestly, I couldn't have been more impressed with the quality. The floor pan was EXACTLY as he described it. And the trunk pan? I was blown away; it has every little fitting as my original, is heavy-gauge metal, EDP primered - and even came with gas tank straps. Here's a pic of the two. Apologies if the pics stink:





Those two pieces get me a good ways towards meeting the metal needs BUT there were still other body panels needed. In the end, I ordered the following EMS products from Rods & Rides:

Both Toe Boards
Both Outer Rockers (floor pan already had the inners!)
Front lower quarter panel for driver's side - refer to the earlier post and you'll see why
Rear lower quarter for driver's side - inner and outer
Rear lower quarter for passenger side
Tail pan

Hopefully, hopefully, HOPEFULLY this gets me and "metal guy" to the point we have what we need for the body. As he progresses, I'll share the pics. In the meantime, I'm going to work on several other aspects including the drive train, suspension, electrical, etc.

More later....



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-06-19 01:55 PM - Post#2763754    
    In response to Keith_Knox

  • Keith_Knox Said:
Good luck, with this formattable job.




Thanks, Keith. I'm going to need it!

Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-07-19 05:31 AM - Post#2763772    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Got my shipment from EMS. Very pleased with the quality. Took them over to "Metal Guy" and found that he's been quite busy:




The initial plan of attack for the floor pan was to leave the body on-frame, cut the pan in half along one of the brace lines, get the halves in the car and weld back together. Metal Guy, though, apparently is never one to shy away from a challenge. With the car placed high-up on jack stands, he built a jig to hold the body at height while he dropped the frame away. Sorry for the sideways pic:


I am stoked at the progress that's been made. We did realize last night that a lot of the metal, such as the bottom of the door frames/pillars, that was near the pans is rust damaged as well. Metal Guy, fortunately, is extremely good at fabricating just about anything from sheet metal, so he's already starting to recreate the damaged sections. I'm very, VERY lucky to have found him since those parts aren't available in reproduction as far as I'm aware and the complexity of the shapes is way beyond my abilities.

I also found that there is major rust on the dash around where the steering column mount is located. Couple that with the customizations (translation - butchering) that I did as a very young teenager to get a stereo installed, and you have a dash very much in need of either major repair work or replacement. By some miracle, when I had those parts cars, I removed and kept the dash from one of them. It's still in perfect shape, so it's going in.

So definite progress. I like progress. Hope to show more very soon.

David




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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Keith_Knox 
Moderator and "17th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 6237
Keith_Knox
Age: 78
Loc: Napa, Ca USA
Reg: 04-02-00
04-07-19 11:36 AM - Post#2763785    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Looking good. Sounds like the Metal Guy was a good find. If you are taking pictures with a phone. Turn the phone sideways to take your pictures. Tony told me that when I was having pictures posting 90 degrees from vertical. Hope it helps.

29-41, 42-48, 49-54 Moderator
1948 Chevy Fleetmaster Coupe Purchased 6/2010. Stock with rebuilt 52 216 installed May 1966.
1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup, stock. Purchased 11/18/17.
2019 Ford Ranger Lariat Super Crew


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-13-19 05:19 AM - Post#2764160    
    In response to Keith_Knox

Metal guy has been at it again. This is the front driver's body brace.


As you can see, most of the metal in the transition from the frame pad to the upright is gone. So Metal Guy worked his magic:



According to Metal Guy, this the second-worst car that he's worked on. The winner was a '55 that, according to him, folded in half when it was pulled off of his trailer. This really doesn't surprise me; I can say with 100% certainty that this car has NEVER, EVER seen the inside of a garage. Mawmaw and Grandaddy's original house didn't have a garage, and with the exception of maybe sitting in their carport in the early '70's for a short period, the car has been out in the weather. And, remember, it was rusty enough in the mid to late '60's that Grandaddy had already made rust repairs; that's over 60 years of exposure to the Georgia environment, enough to rot any piece of metal into the ground.

So, as usual, I'm happy with the progress. Now, quite honestly, I need to start doing some work and stop letting Metal Guy have all the fun.

Oh - and I need to make a correction apparently. It turns out that I didn't tell the whole truth about the spare parts. My younger brother reminded me that he put in a lot of effort to pull a lot of the spare parts from the parts cars - which I remember now - so at least partial credit goes to him for my having enough pieces to rebuild the old girl. I also owe him for ragging me repeatedly over the years to do something with the car. Between him and Mom (and the older brother), they finally convinced me to do the right thing.

More to come.

David




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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-13-19 06:33 AM - Post#2764161    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Engine Plans

I mentioned earlier that the plan was to make the car look as if it had been "rodded up" in the late '50's or 60's. Part of the impetus for this plan is the intended power plant. It's a 1968 vintage 327. The story:

A couple of years ago, Older Brother texted me and told me that his good friend, we'll call him "Hot Rod Guy", had something for me. Older Brother had been telling Hot Rod Guy about my other project, a '72 C-10 Cheyenne, that I'd been working on. I have the original 350 for the truck, but Hot Rod Guy had been approached by one of his contacts with a deal on a 327. The backstory was that the engine was originally from a '68 Corvette, had been punched to .030 over and had been rebuilt less than 1,000 miles ago. It had been in an old rod - something like a '32 roadster.

One of the rocker studs had broken and the owner, who supposedly had more money than sense, pulled it and had a crate engine installed. The price was reasonable, and not so much that it would be a major loss if the story was BS and the engine was bad. So I bit and bought the engine. But even as I was going to get the engine, that small voice in the back of my head was telling me that this engine should go in the '53.

So I get the engine and look at the casting numbers and the ID on the front of the block. The casting on the block confirms that it's a 327; the ID number isn't really definitive, so while this thing could have come from a Corvette, it could have also come from a Camaro or even a truck. And the heads? Hah! Not 327; they're from a 350, early '70's vintage. But I'm not going to sweat it. It's an engine - and I know the basics about working on engines.

I pull the heads and take them to a local machine shop that had been recommended to me. I told them I wanted the press-in studs removed and screw-in studs installed. Easy/quick solution, right? Should only take a week or so. So I waited.

And I waited some more.

And then I waited just a little more.

Let's just say that the shop was slow. When they finally got around to looking at the heads, the owner called me. Turns out that the original press-in studs had been "pinned". For those like me who have never heard of this, it's where they cross-drill a hole through the part of the head where the pins are pressed in, while the studs are in there. Then, pins are pressed into and through the hole. This isn't done any more - but apparently was a quick and easy way to secure the studs "back in the day".

So after about a month, I get the heads back and go to install them. I got them reinstalled along with the new rockers, all nice and adjusted. And then I turned the engine on its side (it's on an engine stand) to look at something.

And that's when the tar oozed out of the fuel pump opening. I'm not talking about oil - at least any kind of oil that belongs in an engine. I'm talking about thick, cold-molasses-like sludge/tar that isn't produced by a healthy engine and sure as heck doesn't come in a "recently rebuilt" engine. With alarm bells going off in my head, I flip the engine completely over and pull the oil pan.

And then I find between a quarter- and half-inch of nasty sludge in the bottom of the pan. Yeah, in no reality - this one or an alternate - was this engine "recently rebuilt" or even taken care of properly. So I pull my just-installed heads back off (bye-bye, expensive head gaskets, it was fun!) strip the engine to just the short block with crank and pistons, and take it to the (slow) machine shop.

After a stupid amount of waiting, the machine shop finally gets to the engine and assesses it. Turned out that there was too much scoring (and ridges) in a couple of cylinders to punch from the .030 that it was to the .040 that we had planned. The shop recommended, and I agreed, to go .060 over.

So I have the engine back and am slowly putting it back together. I've put in a new oil pump, reinstalled the oil pan, installed a new cam, new double-roller timing chain, heads, an old Edelbrock intake and the new rockers.

There's a Summit Racing warehouse not far from me, and I really like the quality of their products, so I'm fortunate in that regard. Most of the parts I've used - cam, oil pump, timing chain - are Summit branded. I'm pretty sure, though, that those parts are made by the brand-name guys, probably from the same facilities where the brand-name goods are coming from.

So that is where I am on the engine. I'll post up pics shortly to let everyone see how it's sitting as of today.

Thanks for checking in,
David





Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-13-19 01:17 PM - Post#2764176    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Engine Pics from today. Got it painted and valve covers installed.




And please ignore the mess behind it. Cleaning that up is my next project (I'll get to it eventually).



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
tommy49 
"5th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2717
tommy49
Loc: Kaleva, Michigan
Reg: 09-28-12
04-16-19 07:44 AM - Post#2764331    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Nice work and progress!

Tommy

49 Deluxe Sport Coupe, 4.8/4L60E swap in progress, Blazer rear axle, 4 wheel power disc brakes.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tommyfortynine /album...




 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
04-28-19 05:06 AM - Post#2765176    
    In response to tommy49

Metal guy has been hard at work.






The bottom few inches of the inner structures and the A Pillar door frame were gone. I mean literally gone. Each of the pieces that you see are hand-formed. Again, I can't express how lucky I was to find Metal Guy. This work is way beyond my abilities.

I also spent a little time at Mom's. I didn't get pics but I've pulled the donor frame from its tomb (was hidden under Mom's porch); I'll be disassembling it soon for cleanup, some rust repair (go figure) and for painting. One of the big decisions I have to make is whether or not to combine the two frames I have. The one under the car has rust damage to the passenger frame rail; the donor has rust damage to the driver rail. I may end up using the best pieces from each to create one solid frame - but I need to critically review the current frame to ensure that it isn't hiding any damage.

I also took some time and looked in Mom's basement. Holy smokes, do I have parts. I'm not going to pull them out yet (don't have the room at home) but when I do, I'll provide pics.

One interesting note of automotive archaeology. If you look at the top pic, you'll see additional welds higher up on the panel. At some point, it appears that the back passenger window had to be serviced or replaced. Apparently, someone didn't know exactly how to remove the window, so their solution was to cut that panel out on 3 of 4 sides, bend it back and do their work. Afterwards, they "repaired" the panel using flat washers sandwiched with machine screws to hold the panel where the cuts were made. Amazing what you find sometimes. I just wonder if it was Grandaddy; it kind of looked like a solution that he might have come up with.

Thanks for checking in.
David



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-06-19 03:33 PM - Post#2765853    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Work on the outer body has begun!






All of the outer panels are EMS. From what I've seen so far, and from what metal guy says, the parts fit great. If anyone is looking to replace their panels, I'd strongly recommend going with them.

Metal guy is ready to start on the passenger side but I've got to order some more parts. When we placed the original order, we thought that the original front lower quarter on the passenger side, as well as the original trunk extension, were still solid. Of course, that was an assumption, and it didn't hold up. So EMS is going to get another order. If I'm right and/or lucky, this will be the last purchase of sheet metal.

I'm hoping to make some progress on either the frame or the replacement dashboard this coming weekend. I'm also planning to place my order for the major suspension components this week, so there should be a lot more activity coming soon.

Thanks for checking in. Lots more goodness is coming!



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
one4dad 
"6th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1544
one4dad
Age: 76
Loc: Baton Rouge La
Reg: 01-17-10
05-06-19 03:58 PM - Post#2765854    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Great progress

Bill Wilson 50 styleline deluxe 2 door sold,- 51 styleline Deluxe 2 door ,'56 235 with dual carter webers on an Offenhauser intake, Fenton headers, 56 chevy rear end and 700R4 transmission.


 
z28summit 
Contributor
Posts: 105

Reg: 06-11-14
05-07-19 07:55 PM - Post#2765919    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Yup. More pictures please!



 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-15-19 03:34 AM - Post#2766433    
    In response to z28summit

Door work pics!







The patch panels are the lower door kits from EMS. The inner panels are great and a perfect fit. The outer panels - the skins - are a little small; we had to "unbend" the flange on the front end of the panels and re-bend them to get the panel to match up with the original skin on the door. Overall, though, the quality is really good. Not perfect, but really good.

I also got the remaining patch panels in - passenger front lower quarter and the passenger trunk extension. Those will be going on soon.

In the meantime, I also received my first shipment from Walton Fabrication. I am VERY impressed with the quality of the trans crossmember. It's made with good, heavy tubing and the welds are beautiful. Also got the V8 engine mount kit but haven't looked at it yet. I'm also very impressed with Todd Walton himself; he's spent a considerable amount of time with me - on the phone and via email - helping me with my needs. I'd highly recommend reaching out to him to anyone who's working on one of these cars.

More updates coming soon. I have dash work to do, a front and rear suspension on order, and Metal Guy is about to start surgery on the firewall.

Thanks,
David



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-25-19 12:53 PM - Post#2767077    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Finally got some time to start working on the dash. Here's where we started (sorry, don't know why first pic is upside down):




Lots of surface rust but, fortunately, no significant pitting and no teenage butchering of openings. Here's what the back looked like after some love with a wire wheel:




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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-25-19 12:59 PM - Post#2767078    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Coated the back of the dash with rust converter:


Yes,it has runs BUT I'm not concerned. No one will ever see the back, and my focus was on getting the rust addressed. Here's where the front sits:



Next up is getting all of the nooks and crannies on the front sanded and then it's getting a couple coats of epoxy. I'm not bothering with the gauge area since that will most likely be cut out to fit a new gauge cluster.




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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-27-19 10:06 AM - Post#2767183    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Got the dash painted with epoxy today. Not pretty but it'll provide a good base once it's sanded down and covered with high-build.

Masked off the back.



Flipped it and cleaned it with acetone:



Shot the primer. I just hope you can't see all the dust and crap in it!



This gets the dash to the point that I can hand it over to Metal Guy. He's going to devise a way to make it a bolt-in unit. Shouldn't be super difficult but he's an engineer and will do it a LOT better than I could.

Lots of parts coming soon. The Supreme Commander (aka my wife) told me that there are several items being delivered tomorrow. I can't wait to see what the big brown truck brings!



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-28-19 03:34 AM - Post#2767217    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Outer body panels are now welded in!











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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


Edited by Franks_Old_53 on 05-30-19 04:02 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
05-30-19 04:01 AM - Post#2767313    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Firewall work - with the V8 going in and my plans to go with a Vintage Air unit for HVAC, we made some mods to the firewall. Here's before:





The old vent tubes won't be going back in and the "ribs" in the center, from what I've been told, have to be cut down for the V8 to fit correctly. Same goes for the emergency brake lever. So metal guy did his magic and here is what we have now:




I've left several of the smaller holes for now. Once the old girl is back in my workshop, and I have everything mocked up and in place, chances are good that more of the holes will be filled.

As for the parking brake, I intend to use the original handle on the inside so I'll have to figure out to integrate it with a new assembly going to the rear. If anyone who reads this has done this, please PM me with how you did it.

Also - got visited by both the big brown and big white trucks earlier this week. I now have the TCI Mustang II front end and a Currie 9" rear. Of course, some assembly is required. I've taken the MII parts to Metal Guy and he's mocking them into place (some welding is required). I'm going to see if I can get the rear end assembled and should be posting pics soon.

Thanks for checking in.
David



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Keith_Knox 
Moderator and "17th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 6237
Keith_Knox
Age: 78
Loc: Napa, Ca USA
Reg: 04-02-00
05-30-19 09:53 AM - Post#2767330    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Moving right along. Good work.

29-41, 42-48, 49-54 Moderator
1948 Chevy Fleetmaster Coupe Purchased 6/2010. Stock with rebuilt 52 216 installed May 1966.
1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup, stock. Purchased 11/18/17.
2019 Ford Ranger Lariat Super Crew


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-05-19 01:53 PM - Post#2767773    
    In response to Keith_Knox

Time to craft a frame rail!

I think I've mentioned several times now about the damage to the front of the passenger frame rail and our intent to splice a section from a parts frame in to make the repair. A few weeks ago, I went over to Mom's and got the donor section. Thanks to my portable compressor, Mom's electricity, 100 feet of air hose, an air-driven impact wrench and a sawz-all, it wasn't so bad.

I took the section over to Metal Guy, all happy that I was getting something done. And then reality visited. When Metal Guy critically assessed the donor section, he decided that it was too corroded to use. So now I'm sitting there. With no usable frame section. And I need one.

So what does Metal Guy do? What he does best!








Yeah, he BUILT A FRAME RAIL! Like I've said before, this guy is not afraid to do anything, and man am I glad. The new section is mostly 1/8 inch plate that he cut/bent/fashioned but there is some donor pieces from the available rails. Now I'll just have to make the rest of the frame look as nice.

While he was at it, Metal Guy also spliced the two front frame crossmembers together into a usable rail. You can see that in the pics above. This should, hopefully, get us to a point that we can go to the next step - the TCI Mustang II front suspension. That's up next...



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-05-19 02:03 PM - Post#2767774    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

So what do you do with a nice looking frame? You add an even nicer looking front suspension from TCI.







We did run into one issue. The TCI instructions for fitting the "top hat" (spring perch) to the frame rail state that you install the lower control arm and shock, and that the shock should go directly up through the center of the hole in the spring perch. Despite measuring numerous times, we couldn't get the top of the shock to line up; note that everything was positioned exactly as instructed. Metal Guy talked to the TCI tech hotline, even emailed and called/spoke to them. In the end, we left the top hat where it was at TCI's instruction; I'm hopeful that it doesn't bite me later - but if it does we'll deal with it. Regardless of that small snafu, the components look great - and the old girl is closer to riding on a modern suspension.

Note the Walton Fab engine mounts as well. When the time comes, I'll install the Walton Fab trans crossmember as well. In the meantime, I have a rear-end that needs to be assembled.





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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
tommy49 
"5th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2717
tommy49
Loc: Kaleva, Michigan
Reg: 09-28-12
06-12-19 06:11 AM - Post#2768302    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Great progress, David! I'm getting ready to order the TCI Eng IFS, but getting info from them is not easy. So, I have some questions for you and Metal Guy. Do you know how much drop, if any, is built into the crossmember and spring towers? The reason I ask has to with what spindles to order, stock or 2" drop. TCI-E can't answer that. I'm going with the RideTech adjustable coilovers and concerned if I can get the ride height adjusted without compromising the ride.

Tommy

49 Deluxe Sport Coupe, 4.8/4L60E swap in progress, Blazer rear axle, 4 wheel power disc brakes.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tommyfortynine /album...




 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-14-19 03:07 AM - Post#2768420    
    In response to tommy49

  • tommy49 Said:
Great progress, David! I'm getting ready to order the TCI Eng IFS, but getting info from them is not easy. So, I have some questions for you and Metal Guy. Do you know how much drop, if any, is built into the crossmember and spring towers? The reason I ask has to with what spindles to order, stock or 2" drop. TCI-E can't answer that. I'm going with the RideTech adjustable coilovers and concerned if I can get the ride height adjusted without compromising the ride.




Hey, Tommy, give Todd Walton at Walton Fabrication a call. He worked at TCI for years (in their engineering department, I believe) and I'm betting that he can give you all the specs. He's also a TCI dealer; I bought my front end from him and he was a wealth of information (not just on the front end but on the car itself which was a huge help).

Good luck on your car!

David

Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


Edited by Franks_Old_53 on 06-14-19 03:11 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-16-19 06:57 AM - Post#2768553    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Yesterday (Saturday, June 15) was a very busy day. Here's a video from the start of the day.

https://youtu.be/DIbErDsG3B4

Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-16-19 07:25 AM - Post#2768556    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Video taken at the end of Saturday, June 15. Very excited at the change!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4Fvj50LLJ0



Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-16-19 09:00 AM - Post#2768563    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

I posted links to videos of yesterday's activity but also wanted to add some pics. I've bemoaned the amount of rust on the car before, and we've covered the work that Metal Guy has done to get rid of the major rust damage. From day one, we had been discussing getting the entire car media blasted once the major work was done. I was 100% on board since it will save a ton of time sanding, wire wheeling, or otherwise removing the remaining surface (hopefully) rust as well as the paint left on the car. Metal guy finished up the major work about a week ago so it was time to get the old girl cleaned.

I didn't know anyone who provided blasting services so googled for "dustless blasting near me" a few weeks ago. Got hits for two vendors. Called the first one - and never got a reply. Amazing how some people don't want to make money. I emailed the second company and the owner returned my call within a few minutes. I talked with the owner, Joel, described what needed to be done, and agreed on a price. The "dustless blasting" system that they use utilizes recycled glass (I guess it's actually really fine sand but I'm no expert) mixed in a water stream; the water keeps the dust down AND, most importantly, keeps the metal temperature way, WAY down to prevent warping.



The media blaster showed up precisely at the agreed-upon time and got to work. Took them about 4 hours to clean the shell (inside and outside, main cabin and trunk), the frame (as much as they could get to it) and all of the front clip parts that I had brought over. For fun, we threw in Metal Guy's grill from his '55 Ford pickup (which is a piece of art in process).

Pic during blasting.


Pic of the car after blasting:


After the media blaster was done blasting, they cleaned up a lot of the area. As anyone who has blasted with any kind of media knows, though, that media goes everywhere - every nook and cranny, every seam, every spot where something can sit, it'll be there. Took us probably 3 hours to get everything blown out and cleaned as much as we could. The blaster actually recommends letting the car dry overnight but with the next day (today) being Father's day, we had to accelerate the schedule.

Once all of the cleanup was done, we wiped down everything we could with acetone. And then we got to painting; at the end of the paint session, we had consumed about 1.5 gallons of PPG epoxy primer. We sprayed it with my trusty 2.0MM primer gun. Boy, that was fun, fulfilling and exhausting! Here is a pic we took after we were done painting:




When done, I was absolutely stoked. I can't count how many times over the years I had dreamed of doing something like this to the car. It's a bit surreal that it's happening after all of these years.

As you might suspect, the blasting did reveal heretofore unseen rust damage. Spots found included two holes in the front windshield channel, swiss cheesed metal around the front fender mounting area, a few pinholes around the body, more rust damage to the beltline (where the SS molding goes) and some swiss-cheese on the inner wall structure behind the the B-Pillar on both sides. Some of this, I'll repair myself once I get the car into my shop. For the complex areas - beltline, windshield channel and fender mounts - I'm calling upon Metal Guy to handle those.

Oh, and of course we found rust damage on the fenders and hood. Metal Guy will handle the fender patches; I think I'll save the hood repair for my shop.

So at the end of the day, the car I have now is far, far different than that car I towed over to Metal Guy 3 months ago. So far, he's put in over 300 hours on the repairs and I've put some modest hours and a hefty chunk of change. If it wasn't my Grandaddy's car, and I knew then about the rust damage that I know now, it probably would have gone to the junkyard; anyone who would be objective about the car would have called it a goner and moved on to easier projects. I, however, am stubborn and sentimental and I won't apologize about it.

So now, I almost have a car that I can repair. Words can't express how stoked how I am.

And I hope that my Grandaddy and Daddy are seeing this and smiling. I loved them both dearly, miss them both, and learned a lot about cars from both. I just hope that my kids look at this car one day and have the same feelings for their dad.

Thanks for checking in. More goodness coming soon.

David



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
one4dad 
"6th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1544
one4dad
Age: 76
Loc: Baton Rouge La
Reg: 01-17-10
06-16-19 02:59 PM - Post#2768597    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Love the videos. Keep up the good work. The new memories will be outstanding
Bill

Bill Wilson 50 styleline deluxe 2 door sold,- 51 styleline Deluxe 2 door ,'56 235 with dual carter webers on an Offenhauser intake, Fenton headers, 56 chevy rear end and 700R4 transmission.


 
tommy49 
"5th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2717
tommy49
Loc: Kaleva, Michigan
Reg: 09-28-12
06-17-19 05:37 AM - Post#2768642    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

  • Franks_Old_53 Said:
  • tommy49 Said:
Great progress, David! I'm getting ready to order the TCI Eng IFS, but getting info from them is not easy. So, I have some questions for you and Metal Guy. Do you know how much drop, if any, is built into the crossmember and spring towers? The reason I ask has to with what spindles to order, stock or 2" drop. TCI-E can't answer that. I'm going with the RideTech adjustable coilovers and concerned if I can get the ride height adjusted without compromising the ride.




Hey, Tommy, give Todd Walton at Walton Fabrication a call. He worked at TCI for years (in their engineering department, I believe) and I'm betting that he can give you all the specs. He's also a TCI dealer; I bought my front end from him and he was a wealth of information (not just on the front end but on the car itself which was a huge help).

Good luck on your car!

David



I emailed Todd for information and a quote on the IFS, motor mounts, and trans crossmember. I've bought parts from Todd before, great guy to deal with.


Tommy

49 Deluxe Sport Coupe, 4.8/4L60E swap in progress, Blazer rear axle, 4 wheel power disc brakes.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tommyfortynine /album...




 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
06-23-19 04:20 AM - Post#2769039    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Brought the old girl home yesterday. The day started off with me going over to Metal Guy's house to bolt on the rest of the TCI front suspension. Took maybe an hour to have her down on the ground and sitting on her own for the first time in 2-3 months:



This was the fun part. Earlier in the week, I had cleaned and painted the front suspension parts; I love seeing fresh paint on just about anything so that was a satisfying job. The NOT fun part was making room in my basement shop. I've let too much "stuff" accumulate over the years, so it took a while to make the space. Add in the space being occupied by the new rear end, tranny and engine and I'm pressed for space. Regardless, I made the space and made the call to the towing company. The driver, Dennis, picked her up and we had her home in about 5 minutes. Pic of her coming up my neighbor's driveway:



Yes - my neighbor's driveway. My very, VERY cool neighbor allows me to access my shop's boat door via their driveway. It is soooo nice to have good neighbors; they can make all the difference.

So my tow truck driver, Dennis, drops the old girl at the edge of the driveway, about 10 feet from the boat door, and kindly offers to help me push the car into the basement. I thank him but decline, explaining that I've been pushing this car around 38 years (no joke) and kind of wanted to do this latest "push" myself. I do though, get my daughter to help keep the passenger wheel lined up right. Without any steering to hold the front wheels steady, they had more than a mind of their own and didn't want to cooperate. After a few minutes, we had the old girl in the shop:



So for the first time EVER that I'm aware of - except for a few months that she sat in my grandmother's carport in the late 70's, the old girl is in a dry, climate controlled environment. She won't be rusting away every day and getting worse. The plan from here, at least the short term plan, is:

1(a)) - Get all of the remaining residual sand out of the car! It's like a beach in there!

1) Make more room in the shop.
2) Separate the body from the frame (may need to build a dolly for the body)
3)Remove the front and rear suspension
4) Clean and paint - maybe powdercoat - the frame.
5) Install the front and rear suspension.
5) Paint the bottom of the car
6) Mate the body and frame back together

I'm also getting Metal Guy to do some repair work on the front fenders. They were pretty solid but need some love and Metal Guy offered. I would do it myself but part of the repair includes re-creating some small portions of the wheel arch; seeing as how Metal Guy can do that in his sleep, I'm calling on him for this last bit of work.

And - for the record - I have started my portion of the body work on the car. There was this annoying dent just above the top of the passenger tail light mount that was driving me nuts. Got out the body hammer and dolly and slowly convinced it back to its original shape. There's a LOT more that still has to be done - but getting that one spot taken care of was awfully satisfying.

So from here on, a lot of what you'll see is my work. Unlike Metal Guy, I'm no expert - but I'm going to keep working on this old girl until I'm done. Besides, I have a shop full of parts - and the easiest way to make room is to install those parts - so that's some major motivation.

More to come soon.




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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
07-01-19 12:00 PM - Post#2769657    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Not the "Welcome Home" I was hoping for.....

During the reconstruction at Metal Guy's place, I had left the rear side windows in the car. After media blasting, we noticed some pinholes on the inner panel below the door - the panel that holds the window crank and arm rest. Considering that the panels are fairly flat, I thought I'd do the repairs on these myself. I thought "how hard could it be?".

I'm such an idiot. Here is what the panels looked like when I started assessing the damage over the weekend:





Step 1 was to remove the side glass. Not super hard but took a little while. Fortunately, I have a copy of the service manual for the car and the instructions were spot-on for removal. Amazingly, only one screw had to be drilled out.

While I was removing the glass, I reached up inside from underneath to try to maneuver either the glass or the crank mechanism - can't remember which - and that is when I learned that this wasn't going to be as simple a fix as I thought.

If you're familiar with these cars, you might already know that, for these windows, Chevy actually built a "pocket" that housed the window and crank mechanism. The "pocket" utilized a stamped section below the window that was then spot-welded to the inner panel to create the pocket. For this old girl, it became obvious that over the years, a lot of debris had sat in those pockets and progressively rotted the metal out. When I reached my hand up into that section, I should have felt the bottom of the pocket. Instead, I felt the rusty remains of the pocket. I checked the other side - exact same thing.

I had a choice - I could (a) ignore the damage and know that I had a compromised structure or (b) do what I knew was right and formulate a repair plan. I went with (b). Here's my plan:

1) Remove (as in cut out) the inner panels, leaving enough material on the edges to attach back to.

2) Using poster board, create templates of the pieces that are needed to restore the sections.

3) Get some sheet metal

4) Transfer the poster board templates to poster board.

5) Cut out and form the panels

6) Weld back in

The hardest part is going to be the corners of the pocket. From what I could tell, they were curved, so I'll have to come up with a method to create curved corners. I have some ideas but we'll have to see if they work. Fortunately for me, Metal Guy is more than willing to help if I need him. I think he feels bad about the damage - but there was no way you could see the damage without the windows out (which I should have done but didn't so this is all on me).

I didn't get too far on the plan but did get the driver panel cut out:



Fortunately, one of my fellow caraholics was ordering some metal for his projects, so he's going to pick up a 4x8 sheet of 18 gauge for me. That should be more than enough (size wise and thickness-wise) for me to make the repair panels from.

This is a bit of a bummer BUT it is not surprising at all. I'm lucky to have friends who are willing to help and it'll be a good learning experience for me. I've bent metal and welded metal but have never created rounded corners or put contours in. Should be interesting.



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
tommy49 
"5th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2717
tommy49
Loc: Kaleva, Michigan
Reg: 09-28-12
07-01-19 03:42 PM - Post#2769679    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Choices 1 through 6 were the rights ones to do.

Tommy

49 Deluxe Sport Coupe, 4.8/4L60E swap in progress, Blazer rear axle, 4 wheel power disc brakes.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tommyfortynine /album...




 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
07-25-19 05:13 PM - Post#2771587    
    In response to tommy49

Finally got started on the repairs. First step was to remove the panels and rotted pockets:



So I have my basic measurements. Next up is trying to form the pockets. Thanks to Metal Guy's guidance, I think that I can get this done.



Before I removed the pockets, I spent some time measuring the remains to try and get an idea of what I needed to make. Fortunately, there was still enough material to get the basic dimensions:







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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
07-25-19 05:29 PM - Post#2771589    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Let's make a pocket!

First things first, I cut myself a section of sheet metal out of the 4x10 panel of 18 gauge that my buddy helped me get. For those like me who haven't worked with sheet metal in years, allow me to remind you that 18 gauge is THICK stuff and doesn't like to bend. I thought I'd be able to cut the piece with my air-driven body saw; let's just say that the saw wasn't up to the task. As a result, I pulled out the 4,500 RPM spinning death wheel and put a carbide cutting wheel on it; yeah, that worked a LOT better than the air saw!

I have a small set of basic hammers and dollys but that's it. To compliment those, I also grabbed some sections of pipe I had laying around as well as any other tools I figured out I needed. For my workspace, I set up a simple bench with saw horses and a piece of 3/4 plywood. Turns out that the plywood was a good call as it allowed me to screw the sheet metal down while trying to form some of the bends and flanges. First pic:



Those first bends quickly taught/reminded me just how thick 18 gauge is; not complaining, though, as this new metal should more than restore the rigidity that the original panel had. At the end of a few hours of measuring, bending, measuring again, bending again, working the hammer/dolly and repeating, I had something that was starting to take shape:



After a little more work, I had something with the basic shape and flanges that I needed. Here's a comparison of the newly-formed pocket along with the original:



This was prior to test fitting. See next post for that fun!





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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
07-25-19 05:45 PM - Post#2771591    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Test Fitting the new panel

It actually went pretty well. At first, I couldn't get the pocket into the cavity where it is supposed to be. The biggest issue was the rear lower corner of the new pocket. I had to trim it up to where the corner started curving at about 6 inches from the top of the pocket. In addition, the top of the rear of the pocket had to be trimmed, along with the front mounting flange. I probably did about 5 or 6 test fittings. Each time, I'd trim a little more, try to install, determine where the obstruction(s) was/were, and trim some more. At the end of the day, I had this:



Comparison to the old panel:



I'm happy with the progress but there's still work to do. I have to finish shaping and welding up the lower corners, along with filling in some small holes made when I screwed the sheet metal to the plywood. Fortunately, my old mig welder is still working so this won't be a problem.

Overall, though, I'm happy that I'm making progress - and I'm doing the work. Now I just have to repeat the whole process for the passenger side AND fashion some patches for the lower parts of the inner panels. I also have to figure out how to recreate the drain line that should go from the pocket to the inner rocker panel - but I have an idea.

Thanks for checking in.





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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Keith_Knox 
Moderator and "17th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 6237
Keith_Knox
Age: 78
Loc: Napa, Ca USA
Reg: 04-02-00
07-25-19 07:19 PM - Post#2771602    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Good job.

29-41, 42-48, 49-54 Moderator
1948 Chevy Fleetmaster Coupe Purchased 6/2010. Stock with rebuilt 52 216 installed May 1966.
1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup, stock. Purchased 11/18/17.
2019 Ford Ranger Lariat Super Crew


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
09-29-19 01:46 PM - Post#2776719    
    In response to Keith_Knox

It's been a while but I haven't been slacking completely. I've completed the fabbing of the window pockets. The remaining tasks were to get the tabs for the felt window channel installed and add a drain tube.

For the drain tubes, I bought a piece of very short pipe, cut it in half, cleaned it, drilled a 1/2 inch hole in the lowest point of the pockets and then welded them in (lower right of top pocket, lower left of lower pocket):



After getting those in, I tried to tackle the tabs for the window felt. These are little spring-steel clips, held in by two rivets each, that I'm assuming secure the bottom of the felt window channels once installed. To begin, I first had to remove them from the old pockets which was 75% successful. I say 75% because, unfortunately and true to form, I broke one of them while removing. I'm pretty sure no one makes these so I tried my hand at making one from the metal I have on hand. It won't have the spring to it BUT I'm hoping that it's better than nothing. Here's a pic after cleaning and painting the clips:



To mount the clips, I'm going to use stainless steel rivets. I think that should hold the clips sufficiently. Next for the pockets will be painting them and getting them welded in. Plan is to to hit every surface with epoxy, EXCEPT for the flanges that will get weld-thru primer.

I'm accumulating a pretty big pile of parts that need epoxy. I feel a "painting party" coming on. Now I just need to hit up my buddy who has the paint booth and see if I convince him to let this amateur in there.

Next up - I'm going to shake things up and try some front fender repairs.



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
09-29-19 02:17 PM - Post#2776720    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Time to tackle the fenders.......

I'm both lucky and not-so-lucky on my fenders. On the lucky side, the fenders I have are FAR, FAR better than the ones that were on the car when I inherited it; they have only the slightest of dents and dings on them.

The unlucky part, and you've probably already guessed it - they have rust. The funny thing about the rust is that most of the damage appears to started on the inside, not on the outside as I would have expected. The lower rear sections of both fenders are swiss-cheese; in addition to that issue, there are pin-holes spots peppering the fenders. Since the fenders flex so much, I don't want there to be any holes (other than for trim), so I'm going to fill them in.

I got the lower rear patches from EMS and was pretty impressed. The curves are spot on and the overall shape is great. Since the rust didn't go as high as the patch panels, I cut the panels down to leave as much original metal as possible. I'm also butt-welding the panels; I'm not completely opposed to lapping the panels but I wanted to butt-weld wherever possible.

First step was to cut the panels down to the size I wanted, fit them to their future home and mark the cut to remove the old panel.

Here's a pic of the passenger fender during mock-up of the panel:



To remove the foldover at the back of the fender, I simply ground the fold down until the fold was gone; I learned that trick years ago from Craig Hopkins and his How-to-ASAP DVD (back before YouTube was a thing). I then used a good old-fashioned cutoff wheel (a thin one) to cut the old panel off, using the new panel as a guide. Once I got the old panel off, I cleaned and painted the brace which was in excellent condition despite the rust around it.

Next, I used panel clamps to hold the patch in place while I started welding the two pieces together. I don't remember where I got these things but they are great for these kinds of projects. Pic of the panel clamped in place and ready to be welded:



If you look at the center of the wheel arch, on the lip, you can see the rust holes that I had to fill. The holes themselves were actually smaller but I used a step-bit to open them to the point where there was strong (enough) metal to weld on to. Boy, that was a ROYAL pain; the metal was stupid-thin in spots so I had to try every technique and setting on the welder to get the new metal in and not blow bigger holes in the fender.

After the typical cycle of make 4-5 small welds, let the panel cool, and repeat, I had the new panel welded on. The one part of the EMS panel that I don't like is that the wheel arch doesn't have the double-bend in it like the original panel. I used a hammer and dolly to the best of my ability to get the panel close; it isn't perfect but it is workable.

Here's a pic of the passenger fender as it stands now. The panel, as far as I'm concerned, is done; I'll leave the finessing to a real body and paint man. I still have a few more pinholes to address (you can see the sharpy marker circles in the pic below) but I'm close enough to declare a minor victory.


I'm about halfway through with the driver's fender. It's in slightly better shape but it does have a big hole from an antenna in it that I'm going to fill. That's for the next entry though. Hopefully, I'll get that done next weekend and post up.

In the meantime, it's also been parts-season. I've ordered a complete set of matching brackets and pullies for the engine so that I don't have to try and search out each one any longer. There's a lot of other parts coming - radiator, brake booster, steering column, etc. Needless to say, I need to get my rear in gear and make some progress.

Thanks for checking in.



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
10-19-19 10:58 AM - Post#2778242    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

More fender time today! Got the patch for the driver's fender installed.







Next up is getting back on the rust damage around the window pockets by the back seats. I've started working on the patches for the panels (pockets are done) but have a ways to go. Turns out it isn't easy to replicate 3/4 inch wide beads in 18 gauge metal. One way or another, though, I'll get them done.

Over the last 2-3 weeks, I've accumulated a bunch of new parts BUT I am making myself stick to the rust repair. If I don't, I won't want to come back to it and get it done. Once I get the rust done, I think it's time for pulling the frame, getting the new rear end installed, painting the frame and maybe undercoating the car. So many things to do, but I'm sticking to the instructions on how to eat an elephant; one bite at a time.

Thanks for checking in.
David



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 
Franks_Old_53 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 93
Franks_Old_53
Loc: Atlanta, GA, USA
Reg: 11-16-02
10-30-19 04:29 AM - Post#2779117    
    In response to Franks_Old_53

Didn't have much car time this past weekend but did get to work on the first patch for the panel under the rear side windows. Metal Guy had shown me how he put beads into metal that look like factory so I took a try. I used a piece of 3/8 inch round bar in conjunction with a 1/2 inch steel pipe that I had cut down the center. Here are some pics:

Started by cutting an oversized piece of 18 guage for the panel.


Here's my homemade forming tool. Used it in conjuction with the BFH in the pic.


The somewhat finished product:


I'll probably end up doing some more work to get the panel to lay flat but it's pretty close. Unfortunately, this is as far as I got this weekend but hope to get more done soon.



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Accountant by profession, wanna-be car restorer by choice

Rebuilding my Granddad's 1953 Chevy 150 https://www.chevytalk.org/fusionbb/showtopic.php?t...


 




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