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Username Post: replace brakes        (Topic#354792)
87GN 
Poster
Posts: 2

Reg: 01-03-19
01-10-19 03:42 PM - Post#2757059    

I have a 1st series Chevy 1955 PU. Completely original. I am doing a frame off restoration. I am looking for brake lines, e-brake cables, shoes, calibers. Are there vendors available?



 


wagonman100 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 14228
wagonman100
Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
01-12-19 12:28 PM - Post#2757199    
    In response to 87GN

Your truck won’t have calipers if it is original and you are restoring it. Surprisingly, Rock Auto carries a lot of stuff for older vehicles and at good prices. They even give a quality rating on a lot of parts. You can also get many parts from places like LMC Truck.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
Don57 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1376
Don57
Age: 68
Loc: Illinois
Reg: 04-28-00
01-14-19 10:37 AM - Post#2757335    
    In response to wagonman100

While you're planning the brake work, you should seriously consider installing a dual master cylinder. It's certainly not original but it's much safer.

Don
1957 3200 Stepside


 
wagonman100 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 14228
wagonman100
Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
01-15-19 06:54 PM - Post#2757499    
    In response to Don57

That is one change I would like to make. Definitely better to have dual reservoirs in case one half goes out.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
Slow Train 
Poster
Posts: 2

Loc: Salt Spring Island, B.C.
Reg: 04-18-19
04-18-19 02:45 PM - Post#2764491    
    In response to 87GN

Just get a tubing bender and buy your brake lines to the closest length from any auto parts.

My strongest recommedation especially since you will have the brake system gutted like I did, is to go with silicone brake fluid.

I did the brakes on my 1951 aluminum step van 39 years ago, and have not rebuilt the master or a wheel cylinder since then. It is absolutely mind blowing that i still have working brakes after the truck sat out in the weather for the last 19 years. I'm just re-restoring it now. I took the master cyl out to put a kit in it and couldn't believe my eyes, the cylinder doesn't even need honing and the only mark in the bore is a thin ring where the piston stop washer and retaining clip goes. None of my wheel cylinders are leaking either. I'd never use anything but silicone brake fluid again.

Terry



 
Slow Train 
Poster
Posts: 2

Loc: Salt Spring Island, B.C.
Reg: 04-18-19
04-18-19 02:54 PM - Post#2764492    
    In response to Slow Train

P.S.

I wouldn't bother with the hassle of fitting a dual cylinder, just make sure your emergency works well. I've driven nothing but '47 to "53 Chev trucks for the last 48 years.

My last flat deck was a 1947 and I kick myself that I let it go so cheap and then later realized the value of the serial number of that truck. The last five digits are the truck number and they were . . . 00101. I had the 101st chev truck of the '47 to '53 style ever built. DOH!

My aluminum Chevy Van is rare too. the people of Chevs of the 40's in Washington said they have never seen one like it. the bodies were built by Van Wilson bodies of Hamilton, Ontario. It will be fun driving it to Washington this summer because Americans have never seen them.

Terry



 
Bel Air kiwi 
"4th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 4558
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
04-18-19 08:29 PM - Post#2764519    
    In response to Slow Train

Hi Terry, I very much agree with you about silicone based brake fluid for collector cars. It is an absolute godsend in terms of system longevity.

I am not so sure on your view on dual masters. My 48 PU spat out an axle due to worn axle circlip and spat the axle into the fender.
No Hydraulic brakes, no E-brake power and swerving across the road out of real control.

Just luck saved me. I could have stopped four times quicker and stayed in my lane if the front brakes were still functional. I think if you are going to replace the master then a dual of the same diameter is very wise.

Out of interest my 48 is a Canadian RHD export model and was therefore made in 1947 and is RHD factory.
Three on the floor and fuel tank under the tray.

I have added a 261 as the 216 was dying and a complete 54 front axle for the Bendix brakes and later shock mounts. Goes stops and rides better.
Just a site work truck awaiting restoration. Although it once was my daily driver.


Cheers Kiwi


48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars.

"They made a desert and called it peace." Tacitus


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 04-18-19 08:32 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Ray P W 
Contributor
Posts: 407

Reg: 09-30-15
04-21-19 04:07 PM - Post#2764766    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

87GN

Like others who have responded I retrofitted a tandem MC onto my restored '36 Chevy PU and use silicone brake fluid. The MC mounts in the same location as the original MC and you'd really have to go looking for it to even notice it is there. The original MC did have a 15 psi residual pressure valve in it so I had to add one of those in each of the brake lines.

One other suggestion I can make is to use asbestos brake shoes (or pads if you convert to disc brakes). Asbestos is still out there and it works way better than the "organic" friction the parts stores have had since about 1980.

When I replaced the "organic" friction on my '32 Ford roadster street rod with asbestos it was like adding a booster, and that is no exaggeration. The brakes on my roadster (GM "Metric" calipers on the front and Ford 10" drums on the rear) are much newer than what you have and despite that I had no trouble finding asbestos pads and shoes.

Ray W



Edited by Ray P W on 04-21-19 04:10 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 


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