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Ecklers AutoMotive
Username Post: Bucket seat mounts/ mounting        (Topic#354754)
TR56210 
Poster
Posts: 64

Reg: 10-28-18
01-07-19 03:26 PM - Post#2756801    

First, I appreciate this web community and have found the same helpful communities for my Bronco and TriumphRocket.

I am progressing on the 56 to the point of needing to set the front bucket seats and seat belts. They are out of Lincoln coupe and look perfect. I have an email out to a seat frame builder to see if he has anything to offer.

If not or if price becomes an issue, also preparing a home built solution. As you guys know the outside bench mounting is 1 1/2 lower than the target inside mouting location. The front of the new seat mounts slant downward at 45 degrees and extend 1 1/2. So, raising the seat height 1 1/2 on the inside and 3 inches on outside and bracing under car with flat bar for seat and seat belts is an option. The other option is to pound down the inside floor, with under bracing to avoid raising the seat the 1 1/2 required in the first option.

If your build required anything close to what I am facing, I would appreciate your advice.



 
Ecklers AutoMotive
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27591
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
01-07-19 06:48 PM - Post#2756817    
    In response to TR56210

I measured the difference in height at 1-1/4", but I guess that's a small detail, as you need the same approach for either measurement.

For the outside mount, I built a piece from 1-1/2" square tube with some brackets made by cutting up some of the same tube - the brackets bolt to the original seat anchors front and back.

I made the inside mount from 1-1/2" wide x 1/4" thick steel bar. Since my seats had seat belt anchors in them I wanted the rear of the inside mount to be anchored to something sturdy. This was accomplished by extending the inner mount to where the bolt went through the floor brace just behind the seat. On the front of the inner mount I just drilled a hole and mounted it through the floor. I put a brace on the bottom of the floor made from the same 1-1/2" x 1/4" steel bar.

Before you commit to the height of your mounts, make sure the bottom cushion of your seats will be right. My seats could be adjusted quite a bit lower than a stock seat, so my 1-1/2" outer mounts were fine. If you need the seat lower, you'll have to cut a tunnel in the floor for the inner mount.

The other thing I had to do with my installation was to do a little cutting on the transmission tunnel so that the seat could be centered behind the steering wheel.




 
TR56210 
Poster
Posts: 64

Reg: 10-28-18
01-07-19 11:03 PM - Post#2756844    
    In response to Rick_L

Thanks for the information and confirmation of approach. For the door side outside mounts,because of the slant of the front seat mount, I think I need to box the ends of the 1 1/2 square pipe to allow for the slant, and either weld in a bolt to allow me to then mount the pipe through the floor vertically, or mount through floor and brace accordingly under the floor.

The 1/4 inch plate on inside mounts should bring seat mounts to level. This will require shaping the floor, and possibly a reshaped divot in the floor to mount.

Thanks for mentioning the need to center the driver seat to wheel, as my initial impression was the seat was biased towards the drivers door.

Until I power the seats to hopefully lower them, my concern is adding seat height.



 
HYPR 
"16th Year" Platinum Supporting Member
Posts: 10753
HYPR
Age: 67
Loc: Shaking and Burning!
Reg: 07-19-01
01-29-19 04:32 PM - Post#2758513    
    In response to TR56210

I toyed with this myself so many years ago and ended up building some mounts. This solved the seat mount problem but as usual when installing modern seats it created another issue and that was the track was longer than the floor. If I had it to do over again which I may do if I ever replace the carpeting again, I would simply take some sheet metal and reform that complete surface over top of the existing floor. I would weld in some spacers under the new surface to add strength to the mounting surface. This would both widen and lengthen the seat mount surface. While I was at it I would fabricate a flat surface to fit over the driveshaft hump to improve the mounting surface for the center console. Under the floor I would replicate the steel plates I have but weld them to the floor and add "L" brackets to the frame for rigidity (this way the seats will actually be mounted to the frame. I know a little over built.). I know it sounds complicated but after discussing this with my son who is a fabricator it is really quite simple and only requires some really easy cardboard templating to aid in the design. First test fit the desired seats using wood blocks to figure where the neutral seat mount position (half way forward and half fully back) will be and mark the floor. Measure the seat mounts. Cut cardboard to fill the gap areas that are too low and make a form leveling the surface off. Then cut the metal sections and by tacking them together shape them to fit. Make your spacers (I recommend thick wall tubing) and weld them over your mounting holes (be sure to mark their locations on the new surface).
Once installed you will find you carpet will lay nice and flat and your seat install will both look clean and be safe.

http://www.cardomain.com/ride/222599
To be born a Redneck is by chance, to live as one is by choice!
Preserving the Redneck tradition one day at a time!


 
100 CHEVY 
Dedicated Member
Posts: 6444
100 CHEVY
Loc: Helena,Missippi,U.S.A.
Reg: 12-09-04
01-29-19 05:59 PM - Post#2758520    
    In response to HYPR

I used 65 Impala buckets in my 57.
It's a good idea to remember the armrests!
Which I forgot,but it still worked out good.
Lot of variables involved doing these seats too.
Consider your height and what is comfortable driving.
I used flat 3/16" plate on the floor,then 1,1/4" square tubing to match the seats feet.
And,used flat plate under the floor for the inside feet of the seats for more strength so it can't pull thru the floor.
Mine do go farther back than the stock seats did,which ruins the backseat access!
Mike.

"You gonna leave it like that?
http://www.picturetrail.com/100chevy


 
TR56210 
Poster
Posts: 64

Reg: 10-28-18
01-30-19 08:24 PM - Post#2758622    
    In response to 100 CHEVY

Thanks for the continued input to my post. Because my seat frame isn’t flat, I had to deal with a front and rear mount points with different decline angles. Using 1 1/4 square metal I fabricated the outside mounts, then used flat 1/4 for the inside with pie slices to support inside ends that follow floor. Was happy to find level and center, especially the drivers side fairly easily.

My next step is to bench test the seats and figure out the wire scheme. My assumption is that the extra wires I am seeing are for the door mounted seat controls that I won’t need as the seat mounted controls should suffice.

If seat mounts were flat, I completely agree that replacing the floor with flat panel would be ideal. As I am 6 10, drivers side passenger room will always be nonexistent. So, once seats are powered and tilted ( I love tilt seats) will drill floor mounts with under bracing. Will do my dang best to tidy up and finish all under dash work before setting seats, sure nice not having to reach around them.



 
toms57 
Senior Member
Posts: 511
toms57
Loc: Caney, Ks, USA
Reg: 10-28-01
02-11-19 11:40 AM - Post#2759634    
    In response to TR56210

My seat came from a 2012 Chevy Cruise. It has air bags in it. The plug in has 2 heavy wires to run the motors and I traced the smaller wires to the air bags. I cut the air bag wires so they can't accidentally get power and set off. just a red and black wire run the seats movements.



 
TR56210 
Poster
Posts: 64

Reg: 10-28-18
02-11-19 10:01 PM - Post#2759694    
    In response to toms57

Man, if I had a do over I would have picked seats from a very popular car. The 98 Lincoln Mark viii coupe is extremely diffult to find replacement seat motors for. And, I guess the second do over would be to test the dang seats before leaving the jy and having them recovered. Looks like drivers side will be fixed as is until I can source a replacement seat motor.



 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27591
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
02-12-19 10:49 AM - Post#2759737    
    In response to TR56210

See if you can find a seat with damaged upholstery that you can buy for cheaper than the going price.



 
TR56210 
Poster
Posts: 64

Reg: 10-28-18
02-12-19 12:04 PM - Post#2759747    
    In response to Rick_L

It is the rarity of this 2 door donor car that is just kicking my butt.

Any chance anyone has a Ford part cross reference url?



 
acardon 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11158
acardon
Loc: DFW TEXAS
Reg: 03-25-05
02-13-19 11:42 AM - Post#2759826    
    In response to TR56210

I would think 4 door models of the same make would use the same parts such as that.

Don
66 Corvair (driving)
57 2dr HT (driving)
56 2dr HT (waiting to be restored)


Edited by acardon on 02-13-19 11:43 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
toms57 
Senior Member
Posts: 511
toms57
Loc: Caney, Ks, USA
Reg: 10-28-01
02-16-19 11:06 AM - Post#2760043    
    In response to acardon

It is hard to believe that this can not be sourced thru a Ford / Lincoln dealership. probably pricy, but available.

Tom



 
Ecklers AutoMotive
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