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Username Post: Leaking rear pinion seal        (Topic#354240)
chnaus 
Member
Posts: 34

Loc: Upstate:The Real New York
Reg: 04-18-03
12-05-18 10:32 PM - Post#2753573    

While I was under the car replacing the tank I checked over the rear axle and
found that besides having two upper control arms it has a leaking pinion seal.

Is this seal an easy replacement

Does the pinion assy. contain a crush sleeve



CH


 

Ecklers AutoMotive

raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27986
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
12-06-18 02:56 AM - Post#2753587    
    In response to chnaus

Yes, the pinion uses a crush sleeve. Replacing the seal is easy. Getting the pinion nut loose and re-torquing it on assembly isn't.

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
Shepherd 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1555

Loc: Lake George, NY
Reg: 11-11-15
12-06-18 05:39 AM - Post#2753596    
    In response to chnaus

Some times you can get away with reusing the old crush collar, if you are going to try this post back, I will tell you what I did.



 
Belair-o 
Contributor
Posts: 126

Reg: 03-26-07
12-06-18 07:37 AM - Post#2753619    
    In response to Shepherd

  • Shepherd Said:
Some times you can get away with reusing the old crush collar, if you are going to try this post back, I will tell you what I did.


HI, I would be interested in hearing what you did, as I am facing the same issue. Thanks, Doug




 
chnaus 
Member
Posts: 34

Loc: Upstate:The Real New York
Reg: 04-18-03
12-06-18 09:26 AM - Post#2753624    
    In response to Belair-o

Sure,Shepard, give us a play by play.

I setup a ring and pinion for a 55 I had,
but, its been a good 30 years ago.
And, that was on the bench.

CH


 
toro455 
"4th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 527
toro455
Loc: Western NY
Reg: 06-15-02
12-06-18 12:34 PM - Post#2753640    
    In response to chnaus

Somewhere I saw a torque spec given for changing that pinion seal assuming that was all you were doing. There was also a spec on how much torque it should take to turn the assembly assuming you were trying to turn one which had already been in service. So in other words the spec to turn the rotating assembly once you have everything torqued to spec. It was different and lower than a freshly assembled unit.

When I changed gears I read a lot of information and a couple of sources mentioned sealing that area so the oil doesn't get to the seal but doing it seemed to be as much an art as a science.

One thing for discussion purposes is however the Ratech solid sleeve plus shims. If you are not planning on changing the set-up at all and only replacing the seal and stopping the leak you should theoretically be able to simply match the height of the current crush collar.

Ratech also sells an alternative lower torque crush collar called a "smart sleeve" but I tried that to start with and the "smart sleeve" fully crushed prior to reaching the minimum torque they gave in the instructions.

Here's a link to the Ratech site:
http://www.ratechmfg.com/toc.htm

Scott



 
Shepherd 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1555

Loc: Lake George, NY
Reg: 11-11-15
12-06-18 01:29 PM - Post#2753647    
    In response to chnaus

Here's how I've done it in my shop. Pull the d'shaft. Remove both rear wheels. Make sure the rotors or drums turn freely, no brake binding issues. Get a bar type inch lb torque wrench. Turn the pinion smoothly as you can and read the resulting torque to do this. Replace the seal. Reassemble the yoke. Bring the pinion nut up til there is no in and out movement of the pinion shaft. Now slowly tighten the pinion nut, keep checking to torque till you get to the original reading on the torque wrench, before you took it apart. Slightly more is ok.



Edited by Shepherd on 12-06-18 01:31 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
A White Sport Coupe 
"8th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 374
A White Sport Coupe
Reg: 08-19-10
12-06-18 03:36 PM - Post#2753656    
    In response to Shepherd

Hi Shepherd,

That's how I did my '61. I also marked the nut and shaft with a punch. When I reassembled it I used the inch pound reading. I also noted that the mark on the nut was about an 8th of an inch shy of it's original spot. I left it alone and it has been fine for several years now.

Bob


 
Jonechev 
Senior Member
Posts: 802
Jonechev
Loc: Cottage Grove,Minnesota. ...
Reg: 05-03-02
12-06-18 09:33 PM - Post#2753698    
    In response to chnaus

Just a thought but also make sure to check the pinion bearing for wear to ensure that the seal is not leaking due to the bearing wearing and the pinion riding on the seal unevenly. With vehicles this old wear is inevitable it's just a matter of how much.



 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27986
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
12-06-18 09:53 PM - Post#2753700    
    In response to Jonechev

To add to what Jonechev said, also check the yoke to see if the seal has worn a groove into it. If it has, don't count on the new seal to stop the leak.
You may also need a "repair sleeve" which fits over the worn area.

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
Belair-o 
Contributor
Posts: 126

Reg: 03-26-07
12-07-18 06:13 AM - Post#2753717    
    In response to Shepherd

  • Shepherd Said:
Here's how I've done it in my shop. Pull the d'shaft. Remove both rear wheels. Make sure the rotors or drums turn freely, no brake binding issues. Get a bar type inch lb torque wrench. Turn the pinion smoothly as you can and read the resulting torque to do this. Replace the seal. Reassemble the yoke. Bring the pinion nut up til there is no in and out movement of the pinion shaft. Now slowly tighten the pinion nut, keep checking to torque till you get to the original reading on the torque wrench, before you took it apart. Slightly more is ok.


Thanks for posting your methodology! Thanks, Doug



 

Ecklers AutoMotive

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