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Username Post: #longread warning. lifter/rod/knock question        (Topic#352304)
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-02-18 11:54 AM - Post#2741786    

96 Chevy C1500 5.7L Vortec

So I am sitting here with my valley wide open to the world, and I have some questions.

Backstory: About a year ago, she had a new radiator installed (and a separate Hayden trans cooler) since I had (count 'em) SIX bad O'Reilly radiators right out of the box before we did what I asked after the first DOA, and got one from 1800radiators that didn't leak.

Fast forward a year or so, temperature gauge not reading right, it smelled like it was running really hot to me, but wasn't registering hot. I'm losing some coolant, but it's not in the oil. It's also not in the tranny, thank goodness.

In between time, I had wanted to replace my spider because I had a couple of leaky injectors (4 and 6), and at the time, I had the money to buy the spider, instead of dorking with the injectors, so I bought that, and was just waiting for an opportune time to change it.

I changed out the one temperature sensor on the manifold to the dash, and then I realized that I don't remember if the thermostat got changed, and I don't think it did. So I bought that.

Hoses could use replacing because they are softish.

So I'm fixin to change the thermostat and the spider and all of a sudden the truck developed a clattering noise that sounded like lifters on bank 2.

Changed the oil, plugs, wires, rotor, cap, but got no love there. Ran it like a ferrari on the autobahn with some seafoam and high octane, which created P0300, P0174 and some other issues. Dead miss on 4. No spark. Exhaust smelled like fuel.

It started out sounding like lifter chatter, but then it started sounding like it was going to throw a rod. The CEL would blink if I was going over 60. If I let off the gas, the chatter would quiet and the CEL would stop blinking. That's really all I know.

I'm only savvy enough to be dangerous, so I took it to two different mechanics... no compression test was performed...and I didn't know to ask for one. But let's face it, I live in a place where most guys only seem to want to do work if they have to make rent that week. Nobody who can, really wants to work on my truck, (or already traded their tools for gas and beer, so they can't) so I have to do a lot of stuff myself, like it or not. It's just the way of my world.

A long long time ago in a land far far away, I helped rebuild a 350 on a Chevelle, and I liked it. So I know one or two relevant things, but I am relearning a lot of things, and dove into this, feeling my way in the dark, so to speak.

In the process of removing the thermostat, (which I was using as a meditation instrument to decide what to do next) a neighbor happened along and decided that I looked like I needed help. So he helped me by snapping the stud on the thermostat housing and then costing me 5 tap things that didn't work, and days and days of "let's try this", when I finally said F-that thank you and bought a refurbished manifold that I hope won't have issues. Then the neighbor brought me one (trying to make amends I guess) from u-pull-it and so I have two manifolds. (I haven't seen him since lol.)

As I discovered the other previous weirdness with the old manifold, I don't feel bad about replacing that.

So like I said...I am sitting here with my valley wide open to the world, and I have some questions.

Surprise, surprise, all of Bank 2 components, springs, rods, everything, are a completely different color than bank 1. They look a lot newer and cleaner. So I'm thinking maybe this truck has been here before, but I have owned this truck for almost 10 years. I have only put about 50k miles on this truck in that 10 years. (I don't go very far, but I go pretty fast.)

The intake manifold gaskets were practically nonexistent and fell completely apart when I pulled that.

I have read that I can clean my valley with a quart of ATF, (and then change the oil) but I don't know how long that can safely sit in there while I work on this, because it is corrosive. It's going to be a few days because I have to order more things when I get paid tomorrow, and wait for them to get here. Probably Tuesday.

Given the condition of the manifold gaskets, I am now concerned about the head gaskets. I bought these Felpro gaskets for the upper manifold, but not the set with the head gaskets.

If I am going to replace the head gaskets, I might as well (do what else?) while I have that opened up. <<< That's the main question, by the way.

At the risk of throwing money where it doesn't belong, because I am kind of flying blind without the compression test, and not really sure what to do next.

I had been thinking about ordering an ignition coil but thinkin now that I'll wait and test the old one after I get it put back together (since I didn't think to do that beforehand)?

I could be pulling the heads and doing "something" while I wait, but I need the spring compression tool, too.

If this was your truck, what would be YOUR next move?

Thanks for sticking with me and TIA.

Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
runamukker 
Poster
Posts: 54

Reg: 01-01-18
08-02-18 07:01 PM - Post#2741817    
    In response to daphne

Well, lifter clatter could be loose valve train components. Since you have the intake manifold removed it would
be easy to check if the pushrods feel sloppy, wiggle, etc., compare them to each other...if some are really loose
it could be rocker arms need adjusting or a rocker arm stud got pulled loose.

'92 K1500 Blazer Z71 350TBI 700R4 , 253,000 miles
'94 C1500 Cheyenne WT 350TBI 4L60e , 565,000 miles


 
Bad56Sedan 
"11th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 943
Bad56Sedan
Loc: Pasadena, Texas
Reg: 04-29-04
08-02-18 07:14 PM - Post#2741819    
    In response to daphne

I wonder if you could be lucky enough that just the #2 cylinder lifters are collapsed, bad.
maybe just get away with changing all the lifters?
No, that would be too easy.
If you pull the heads why not have them checked for cracks?
Woulda, coulda, shoulda when you put it all back together to find it still knocking?
A lot of times curing such issues is easily fixed by the amount of $100 bills you throw at it, usually more than necessary.
5.7 , L31 Long block at JEGs is $2075.
Just think 25 $100 bills would solve this issue.
You were lucky with your neighbor, I'm sure it took less than 30 seconds for him to snap that bolt, but at least he hung around for a few days!
All kidding aside, I would be leary since you say it may have been knocking and may have gotten hot.
Good luck.

VC56S 2 door Sedan, 38 Years



 
454cid 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2921

Age: 45
Loc: West Michigan
Reg: 02-18-12
08-02-18 07:58 PM - Post#2741826    
    In response to daphne

  • daphne Said:

I'm losing some coolant, but it's not in the oil.



How did you verify that the coolant is not in the oil?


  • Quote:
I changed out the one temperature sensor on the manifold to the dash



That's actually for the PCM. The gauge sensor is in one of the heads.


  • Quote:
Changed the oil, plugs, wires, rotor, cap, but got no love there. Ran it like a ferrari on the autobahn with some seafoam and high octane, which created P0300, P0174 and some other issues. Dead miss on 4. No spark. Exhaust smelled like fuel.



The P0300 is a random misfire, and P0174 is lean on bank 2.


  • Quote:
The intake manifold gaskets were practically nonexistent and fell completely apart when I pulled that.



Intake manifold gaskets are known for going bad on the small block Vortec, but usually you get coolant into the oil.
  • Quote:

I have read that I can clean my valley with a quart of ATF, (and then change the oil) but I don't know how long that can safely sit in there while I work on this, because it is corrosive.



ATF should be fine in the oil. Some people regularly run some ATF in their oil although the benefits are debated. Make sure you don't have any gasket material or anything else in there, Though. What is it that you're trying to clean out?
  • Quote:

Given the condition of the manifold gaskets, I am now concerned about the head gaskets. I bought these Felpro gaskets for the upper manifold, but not the set with the head gaskets.



I wouldn't assume the head gaskets are bad without doing some trouble shooting there first.



99 K3500 RCLB


 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-02-18 09:12 PM - Post#2741832    
    In response to 454cid

  • 454cid Said:
  • daphne Said:

I'm losing some coolant, but it's not in the oil.



How did you verify that the coolant is not in the oil?

No cloudy or chocolaty looking discoloration of the oil that indicated anything mixed with it. Given the amount of coolant I had been losing every time I drove it, I am positive it would have shown up if it had gone there.

  • Quote:
I changed out the one temperature sensor on the manifold to the dash



That's actually for the PCM. The gauge sensor is in one of the heads.

I misstated the manifold. Yes, the one on the driver's side, looks like a spark plug...kinda between 1 & 3. That one. The other one was changed as well, sometime in the last year, but not in conjunction with this issue.

  • Quote:
Changed the oil, plugs, wires, rotor, cap, but got no love there. Ran it like a ferrari on the autobahn with some seafoam and high octane, which created P0300, P0174 and some other issues. Dead miss on 4. No spark. Exhaust smelled like fuel.



The P0300 is a random misfire, and P0174 is lean on bank 2.

Yes, and one of the codetalkers said to me "random MULTIPLE misfires". I know P0174 means lean, but the exhaust smelled really rich, like straight fuel. Does that even make sense?

  • Quote:
The intake manifold gaskets were practically nonexistent and fell completely apart when I pulled that.



Intake manifold gaskets are known for going bad on the small block Vortec, but usually you get coolant into the oil.

Sometimes even I get lucky? Actually, the oil looks a lil burnt, like it needs changed again, but not milky at all. Actually, this was the reason I was going to change the thermostat in the first place.

  • Quote:

I have read that I can clean my valley with a quart of ATF, (and then change the oil) but I don't know how long that can safely sit in there while I work on this, because it is corrosive.



ATF should be fine in the oil. Some people regularly run some ATF in their oil although the benefits are debated. Make sure you don't have any gasket material or anything else in there, Though. What is it that you're trying to clean out?

Well, my magic lil mix of ATF and ethanol works better than anything to get corroded bolts loose, so I am pretty sure ATF can eat stuff. That was why I questioned the safety of leaving it sit there for any length of time. As to what I am cleaning? Everything? I reckon when I ran it with the high octane I knocked some junk loose that caused at least some of these issues, and it probably isn't out of the system yet. All of Bank 1 is a mess with (apparently) normal 250+k mile carbon and crud. Bank 2 looks almost brand new, yet that is where all my problems are. I am also going to vacuum it out, because there is a lot of engine crud aside from gasket shards that could get in there.

  • Quote:

Given the condition of the manifold gaskets, I am now concerned about the head gaskets. I bought these Felpro gaskets for the upper manifold, but not the set with the head gaskets.



I wouldn't assume the head gaskets are bad without doing some trouble shooting there first.

Ok.




Thanks :-)


Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-02-18 09:26 PM - Post#2741833    
    In response to Bad56Sedan

  • Bad56Sedan Said:
I wonder if you could be lucky enough that just the #2 cylinder lifters are collapsed, bad.
maybe just get away with changing all the lifters?
No, that would be too easy.
If you pull the heads why not have them checked for cracks?
Woulda, coulda, shoulda when you put it all back together to find it still knocking?
A lot of times curing such issues is easily fixed by the amount of $100 bills you throw at it, usually more than necessary.
5.7 , L31 Long block at JEGs is $2075.
Just think 25 $100 bills would solve this issue.
You were lucky with your neighbor, I'm sure it took less than 30 seconds for him to snap that bolt, but at least he hung around for a few days!
All kidding aside, I would be leary since you say it may have been knocking and may have gotten hot.
Good luck.



Thanks! lol! I was thinking when I wrote all that, "nothing here a new truck can't fix" lol. Wish I could, but I can't right now. And yes, I perused some new crate engines, too. A buddy of mine put one in his 96, but he got a carb engine instead of EFI. Complains he can't get the timing right. Been cussing at it for months.

I don't think it was even the neighbor's doing caused that stud to snap. I think, given the amount of patching that has been done to stuff that I can see, that somebody broke that stud a long time ago and dropped some weld in there to "fix" it. NO amount of drilling was tapping that beyond a certain point, and we burned up 5 bits, one drill motor, and two of my neighbor's friends trying to do it. I wasn't mad or upset, or even surprised that it broke. I just couldn't see spending a whole week (or more) trying to get it out.


Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-02-18 09:39 PM - Post#2741834    
    In response to runamukker

  • runamukker Said:
Well, lifter clatter could be loose valve train components. Since you have the intake manifold removed it would
be easy to check if the pushrods feel sloppy, wiggle, etc., compare them to each other...if some are really loose
it could be rocker arms need adjusting or a rocker arm stud got pulled loose.



Ok. Thanks. I figured it would be pretty dumb to just put it back together without at least looking it over, since I've got it this far open.


Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
454cid 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2921

Age: 45
Loc: West Michigan
Reg: 02-18-12
08-03-18 08:42 AM - Post#2741851    
    In response to daphne

  • daphne Said:

No cloudy or chocolaty looking discoloration of the oil that indicated anything mixed with it. Given the amount of coolant I had been losing every time I drove it, I am positive it would have shown up if it had gone there.



You mentioned that you don't drive it a lot, but when your do drive it, does it run for a long time, or is it short trips?


  • Quote:
Yes, and one of the codetalkers said to me "random MULTIPLE misfires". I know P0174 means lean, but the exhaust smelled really rich, like straight fuel. Does that even make sense?



Maybe you have an air leak someplace... the PCM is sensing excess oxygen so it's calling for more fuel.

  • Quote:

Sometimes even I get lucky? Actually, the oil looks a lil burnt, like it needs changed again, but not milky at all. Actually, this was the reason I was going to change the thermostat in the first place.



What do you mean by burnt? Black/brown and sludgy?


  • Quote:
Well, my magic lil mix of ATF and ethanol works better than anything to get corroded bolts loose, so I am pretty sure ATF can eat stuff.



It's doing it's thing because it's a thin oil thinned down even further in your mix, so it seeps into tiny spaces, and lubricates the bolt/nut.

  • Quote:
As to what I am cleaning? Everything? I reckon when I ran it with the high octane I knocked some junk loose that caused at least some of these issues, and it probably isn't out of the system yet.



The high octane fuel shouldn't knock anything loose. It's just harder to pre-ignite... which is something you don't want to happen, but happens with lower octane fuel, in a higher compression engine.

I wouldn't get too carried away cleaning anything... pickout any loose chunks of sludge, and scape out the as much as you can and call it good.... except make sure you get ALL gasket pieces. You don't want gasket pieces, or anything else reaching the oil pickup and blocking the pump from sucking up oil.

I would recommend running Marvel Mystery Oil or Seafoam in the oil after you get it running again, and then changing the oil again after maybe 100 miles... use cheap oil of the proper weight don't by anything fancy.




99 K3500 RCLB


 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-03-18 09:47 AM - Post#2741862    
    In response to 454cid

  • 454cid Said:
  • daphne Said:

No cloudy or chocolaty looking discoloration of the oil that indicated anything mixed with it. Given the amount of coolant I had been losing every time I drove it, I am positive it would have shown up if it had gone there.



You mentioned that you don't drive it a lot, but when your do drive it, does it run for a long time, or is it short trips?

Not short trips, no. I am in the middle of notathing, 30 minutes from anywhere in any direction. Mostly high speed rural highway miles.


  • Quote:
Yes, and one of the codetalkers said to me "random MULTIPLE misfires". I know P0174 means lean, but the exhaust smelled really rich, like straight fuel. Does that even make sense?



Maybe you have an air leak someplace... the PCM is sensing excess oxygen so it's calling for more fuel.

Ok, that makes more sense, thanks. I thought this was related to the leaky fuel injectors, and just speeded up the necessity for replacing that spider.

  • Quote:

Sometimes even I get lucky? Actually, the oil looks a lil burnt, like it needs changed again, but not milky at all. Actually, this was the reason I was going to change the thermostat in the first place.



What do you mean by burnt? Black/brown and sludgy?

Not sludgy. Just a lot darker than I would have expected for the age of the oil change.


  • Quote:
Well, my magic lil mix of ATF and ethanol works better than anything to get corroded bolts loose, so I am pretty sure ATF can eat stuff.



It's doing it's thing because it's a thin oil thinned down even further in your mix, so it seeps into tiny spaces, and lubricates the bolt/nut.

I meant acetone, not ethanol. I don't keep much of that stuff around. I buy a lil bottle of 100% pure acetone nail polish remover at the dollar store and mix as needed, but I know the stuff sure does work great.

  • Quote:
As to what I am cleaning? Everything? I reckon when I ran it with the high octane I knocked some junk loose that caused at least some of these issues, and it probably isn't out of the system yet.



The high octane fuel shouldn't knock anything loose. It's just harder to pre-ignite... which is something you don't want to happen, but happens with lower octane fuel, in a higher compression engine.

I wouldn't get too carried away cleaning anything... pickout any loose chunks of sludge, and scape out the as much as you can and call it good.... except make sure you get ALL gasket pieces. You don't want gasket pieces, or anything else reaching the oil pickup and blocking the pump from sucking up oil.

I would recommend running Marvel Mystery Oil or Seafoam in the oil after you get it running again, and then changing the oil again after maybe 100 miles... use cheap oil of the proper weight don't by anything fancy.


So you don't think I should be looking at the rods or anything while I have this open? There was that knock. I imagine a broken one would be obvious, but beyond that, I'm not sure what is normal. I do know this bank 2 with all it's problems looks all brand new compared to bank 1. Bank 1 looks like it needs a good cleaning. It's filthy with carbon. But I also know that sometimes is better to leave that alone because it might be holding something together! I want to do what is prudent, and as much as I enjoy tinkering with my truck, and knowing or learning one or two things, opening it up like this again in the near future isn't on my short list of fun filled adventures.







Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
rain_man_rich 
Contributor
Posts: 141

Loc: Grants Pass, OR
Reg: 02-09-14
08-03-18 10:01 AM - Post#2741863    
    In response to daphne

You are really really REALLY needing a compression test at this time.

Head gaskets on these chevs can go bad allowing the compressed gas from one cylinder to travel into the one next to it. This will make for a dead misfire on two cylinders that are next to each other (like 4 and 6). If its' bad enough you wont even need a compression guage, there wont even be enough compression to blow past your finger in the hole. When I helped my nieghbor sort this issue out, he mentioned that he heard clunking from his engine too.

As far as taking the heads off to see more where the clunking is coming from, you wont be able to see much except the tops of the pistons. You are better of dropping the pan if you can and rotating the assembly back and forth to see how much slop you can see. A clunk or knock usually can be determined from there.



 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-03-18 12:45 PM - Post#2741878    
    In response to rain_man_rich

  • rain_man_rich Said:
You are really really REALLY needing a compression test at this time.

Head gaskets on these chevs can go bad allowing the compressed gas from one cylinder to travel into the one next to it. This will make for a dead misfire on two cylinders that are next to each other (like 4 and 6). If its' bad enough you wont even need a compression guage, there wont even be enough compression to blow past your finger in the hole. When I helped my nieghbor sort this issue out, he mentioned that he heard clunking from his engine too.

As far as taking the heads off to see more where the clunking is coming from, you wont be able to see much except the tops of the pistons. You are better of dropping the pan if you can and rotating the assembly back and forth to see how much slop you can see. A clunk or knock usually can be determined from there.



Can I even do a compression test just hooking the battery up to the starter with the intake manifold off? Will it crank enough (or at all) to get a compression reading on a tester if I do that? I don't know if I can do anything from underneath, as it sits, or not. I can try, if I can make it safe and still reach. It's tight under there. Thanks for your response.



Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
454cid 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2921

Age: 45
Loc: West Michigan
Reg: 02-18-12
08-03-18 02:54 PM - Post#2741885    
    In response to daphne

  • daphne Said:

Not short trips, no. I am in the middle of notathing, 30 minutes from anywhere in any direction. Mostly high speed rural highway miles.



You could have a coolant in the oil, and be burning off most of the water then. I worked for a company that had a carpet cleaning van do that. The van was driven for shirt trips, but the vans engine is what drove the carpet cleaning machine, so it ran a most of the time the carpet cleaning tech was on the job, at elevated rpms.

  • Quote:
Ok, that makes more sense, thanks. I thought this was related to the leaky fuel injectors, and just speeded up the necessity for replacing that spider.



Well the spider could still be bad. I'm not really familiar with how those fail, Though. My engine doesn't use one, so I haven't paid close attention to their issues.


  • Quote:
Not sludgy. Just a lot darker than I would have expected for the age of the oil change.



It may be concentrated coolant, if you're burning off the water. What are you running for coolant? The van I mentioned earlier had Dexcool in it, so the oil would start to turn a very dark reddish shade, with bits of sludgy goo in it... it was being run hard daily, Though.

  • Quote:

I meant acetone, not ethanol. I don't keep much of that stuff around. I buy a lil bottle of 100% pure acetone nail polish remover at the dollar store and mix as needed, but I know the stuff sure does work great.



It's not perfumed? I've tried acetone and ATF or power steering fluid, but I don't normally have the patience to mix it up, or have a handy container for it.


  • Quote:
So you don't think I should be looking at the rods or anything while I have this open? There was that knock. I imagine a broken one would be obvious, but beyond that, I'm not sure what is normal.



The lower end won't be visible from the top of the engine even with the heads off. I do not have experience with lower end problems... although I did manage to start the Oldsmobile 307 that I'm pretty sure threw a rod internally, while my little brother was driving it. It shook horribly.



99 K3500 RCLB


 
runamukker 
Poster
Posts: 54

Reg: 01-01-18
08-03-18 03:30 PM - Post#2741889    
    In response to daphne

Something else to look at; cut open the oil filter and look for metal bits, babbitt looks like aluminum when it starts shredding and you will see it in the filter.

Thats if you are not already going into the bottom end.

You will also have a lot of carbon in the filter from that seafoam unless you changed the filter already.

'92 K1500 Blazer Z71 350TBI 700R4 , 253,000 miles
'94 C1500 Cheyenne WT 350TBI 4L60e , 565,000 miles


 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-03-18 05:35 PM - Post#2741893    
    In response to 454cid

  • 454cid Said:
  • daphne Said:

Not short trips, no. I am in the middle of notathing, 30 minutes from anywhere in any direction. Mostly high speed rural highway miles.



You could have a coolant in the oil, and be burning off most of the water then. I worked for a company that had a carpet cleaning van do that. The van was driven for shirt trips, but the vans engine is what drove the carpet cleaning machine, so it ran a most of the time the carpet cleaning tech was on the job, at elevated rpms.

I'm usually out with it probably once a week, tops. I don't drive it hard, per se, but you have to do 70 or get run off the road around these parts.

  • Quote:
Ok, that makes more sense, thanks. I thought this was related to the leaky fuel injectors, and just speeded up the necessity for replacing that spider.



Well the spider could still be bad. I'm not really familiar with how those fail, Though. My engine doesn't use one, so I haven't paid close attention to their issues.

In reading I have done, when I was deciding whether to just replace the bad injectors or the whole darned thing, OEM injectors have a lot of issues, and it is primarily the design.


  • Quote:
Not sludgy. Just a lot darker than I would have expected for the age of the oil change.



It may be concentrated coolant, if you're burning off the water. What are you running for coolant? The van I mentioned earlier had Dexcool in it, so the oil would start to turn a very dark reddish shade, with bits of sludgy goo in it... it was being run hard daily, Though.

Yes Dexcool. It's not dark red or reddish. It's more like dark brown going to black. Like Burnt. Clear not cloudy. I didn't see sludge, either. But I sure can put some in a jar and see what it does.

  • Quote:

I meant acetone, not ethanol. I don't keep much of that stuff around. I buy a lil bottle of 100% pure acetone nail polish remover at the dollar store and mix as needed, but I know the stuff sure does work great.



It's not perfumed? I've tried acetone and ATF or power steering fluid, but I don't normally have the patience to mix it up, or have a handy container for it.

No it's not perfumed. 100% pure acetone. Not much to it. It's just a 50/50 mix. I eyeball that. But I always do it in a glass container, like an instant coffee jar.


  • Quote:
So you don't think I should be looking at the rods or anything while I have this open? There was that knock. I imagine a broken one would be obvious, but beyond that, I'm not sure what is normal.



The lower end won't be visible from the top of the engine even with the heads off. I do not have experience with lower end problems... although I did manage to start the Oldsmobile 307 that I'm pretty sure threw a rod internally, while my little brother was driving it. It shook horribly.

Ok. So I can only do so much, then, unless I can work underneath. I'll check to see if I can. Didn't get to that today. It didn't shake at all, but the knock becomes rather frightening at higher rpms. I can quiet it down by taking my foot off the gas, it's always louder on acceleration, and at higher speeds the CEL would be blinking and the CEL would stop blinking right at 2k on deceleration






Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
daphne 
Poster
Posts: 20

Loc: Texas
Reg: 09-20-15
08-03-18 05:38 PM - Post#2741895    
    In response to runamukker

  • runamukker Said:
Something else to look at; cut open the oil filter and look for metal bits, babbitt looks like aluminum when it starts shredding and you will see it in the filter.

Thats if you are not already going into the bottom end.

You will also have a lot of carbon in the filter from that seafoam unless you changed the filter already.



I sure will look at that, thanks. I don't know yet about doing anything from the bottom. Didn't get to check that out today.


Miss Behavin' is a 96 Chevy C1500 Stepside 5.7L V8


 
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