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Username Post: Advice wanted: Magnetic engine block or oil pan heater        (Topic#348994)
hand123 
Poster
Posts: 40

Reg: 07-15-12
01-03-18 02:39 PM - Post#2719893    

Hello,
Boy, it's cold here in the northeast this year. I'm worried that after letting my 1950 Chevy SBC 350 sitting for a while, that the engine is dry and the oil is too thick to move around quickly upon an initial start attempt.

Does anyone have any advice and / or experience with these magnetic heaters?

Seems logical. Place it on the oil pan for a while to warm up the oil.

Kat's 1160 300-Watt Magnum Handi-Heat Magnetic Heater

Kat's 1153 Handi-Heat 200 Watt Magnetic Heater

Any information is appreciated.
Thanks



 

Chevs of the 40s

2blu52 
"17th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 18570
2blu52
Age: 85
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
01-03-18 02:51 PM - Post#2719894    
    In response to hand123

Magnetic heaters are next to nothing. If you want good block heat get a regular block heater and install it in the proper soft plug site. Gets cold in Montana to.

"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


Edited by 2blu52 on 01-03-18 03:19 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
hand123 
Poster
Posts: 40

Reg: 07-15-12
01-03-18 03:04 PM - Post#2719896    
    In response to 2blu52

  • 2blu52 Said:
Magnetic heaters are next to nothing.



When you say "next to nothing" do you mean they are inexpensive? Or do you mean that they do not work? Or do you mean that they are better than nothing in that they actually do help a little bit? Do you mean I should not waste my time with magnetic and go with what you suggest which is better?
Thanks



 
2blu52 
"17th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 18570
2blu52
Age: 85
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
01-03-18 03:18 PM - Post#2719900    
    In response to hand123

Sorry I thought I explained it with my comments. I would not waste money on a magnetic heater if the weather is going to be what we call cold here 0 or lower. They might work around freezing but again a block heater in my mind is the only way to go.

"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"3rd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 4332
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-03-18 04:55 PM - Post#2719906    
    In response to 2blu52

Hi Guys, If its below freezing isn't mother nature telling you something about the road conditions.

We do have some cold places and we have a facility called the snow farm which is used by international builders for vehicle testing, but that is at altitude.

The only vehicles I know that use engine heaters here are emergency service vehicles, mainly fire engines. Its not because its cold, it's because they are going out the door at full throttle with a big load in a heavy vehicles. So its all about engine wear not cold.

As you are not emergency service vehicles you have two separate issues. The first is cold start friction and loss of battery power through lower temperatures.
The second is that once started you need to let them warm up for longer before they are normalized.

The real question is how much you want to spend to solve the problem. Apart from a wider spread multi grade oil in winter, you may find putting a socket on the crank nut and breaking the stick of the static engine is all it needs. Alternately bit of spray engine start or a booster battery may do the trick.

If its super cold you can increase the ratio of glycol mix in the antifreeze to water ratio, and heating of either or both the oil and water may be necessary.

If its a daily problem for half the year then obviously you need to get a bit more serious.

Cheers Kiwi

48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars.

"They made a desert and called it peace." Tacitus


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 01-03-18 05:23 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Idaho 
"9th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 440
Idaho
Loc: Upstate New York
Reg: 03-02-07
01-03-18 06:39 PM - Post#2719916    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

I have one of the magnetic block heaters, I put it on the side of my 235 block for extra insurance it doesn't freeze up.
The other day I reached down to see if it was working and I burned my fingers! One of those on your oil pan will keep it toasty warm for sure.
It does come with a plastic extension handle that is screwed on to the unit for safe handling..

1953 210 Chevy convertible, 1955 GMC pickup, 1957 GMC Suburban Carryall, 1952 MGTD convertible, 1973 HD Superglide, 1972 HD Electraglide, 2002 HD Heritage Softail Springer.


 
2blu52 
"17th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 18570
2blu52
Age: 85
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
01-03-18 07:41 PM - Post#2719927    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

  • Bel Air kiwi Said:
Hi Guys, If its below freezing isn't mother nature telling you something about the road conditions.

We do have some cold places and we have a facility called the snow farm which is used by international builders for vehicle testing, but that is at altitude.

The only vehicles I know that use engine heaters here are emergency service vehicles, mainly fire engines. Its not because its cold, it's because they are going out the door at full throttle with a big load in a heavy vehicles. So its all about engine wear not cold.

As you are not emergency service vehicles you have two separate issues. The first is cold start friction and loss of battery power through lower temperatures.
The second is that once started you need to let them warm up for longer before they are normalized.

The real question is how much you want to spend to solve the problem. Apart from a wider spread multi grade oil in winter, you may find putting a socket on the crank nut and breaking the stick of the static engine is all it needs. Alternately bit of spray engine start or a booster battery may do the trick.

If its super cold you can increase the ratio of glycol mix in the antifreeze to water ratio, and heating of either or both the oil and water may be necessary.

If its a daily problem for half the year then obviously you need to get a bit more serious.

Cheers Kiwi


Sorry but if it is -20 out there you plug in a 500 watt block heater before going to bed and it will start in the morning, all that stuff about glycol has been taken care of.


"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
rrausch 
"14th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 13890
rrausch
Loc: L.A, Cal. & St. Louis...
Reg: 04-07-03
01-03-18 11:55 PM - Post#2719943    
    In response to 2blu52

Back in the early 1970's I drove a VW and on mornings when it was below freezing I'd lay an old bathroom wall heater--the kind that was 110VAC--on the ground and slide it under the engine. I'd plug that baby in and go back inside and have a cuppa. After just a few minutes the engine was all warm and toasty. But I never left it on for more than a few minutes.

1953 210 Convertible, 261 with dual Carter YF 966S carbs, P.S., Remote Bendix P.B. Booster... shade-tree restoration about done.




 
johnwd98 
Contributor
Posts: 294
johnwd98
Age: 69
Loc: Little Falls, MN
Reg: 09-05-10
01-04-18 06:53 AM - Post#2719950    
    In response to hand123

I may be misunderstanding the question but, I see no need for any kind of engine preheat if your not driving it during the Winter. Living in Minnesota all my life has given me lots experience with cold weather starts. When I owned a small plane the recommendation was to cover the engine and preheat with a block heater when the temp went below 20F. There are lots of myths still hanging on about the old motor oils. Do not start the engine at all during the Winter unless you have to. You do more damage than good by periodically starting a cold engine during the Winter to get the oil circulated again. Cold starts even with an engine heater are when the most wear occurs. Plus if your not going to drive it any distance the condensation in the oil pan and exhaust system will not get "burned" off. You will be just adding more condensation to your engine and exhaust system.

1950 Fleetline, 350 TBI, 700R4, 3.73 posi rear Blazer axle, MII front. Remote door and trunk locks, GM cruise control, A/C,


 
gsnort 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 78
gsnort
Loc: Waupun, Wisconsin
Reg: 05-06-16
01-04-18 06:53 AM - Post#2719951    
    In response to rrausch

Folks on the east coast think it's cold. We in flyover country can only chuckle. I can remember in the early 50's when my old man would shovel hot coals out of the furnace, put them in a pan, and stick the burning coals under the Oldsmobile's oil pan. Good grief, not too safe, eh? But his system worked every time.

Also, in 1962, it got down to -48 Fahrenheit. I got the VW engine to start but the car wouldn't move because the tires were frozen to the ground.

Turns out the best engine heaters for the money were frost plug heaters.



 
VANDENPLAS 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1788
VANDENPLAS
Age: 39
Loc: ontario canada
Reg: 07-29-09
01-04-18 07:48 AM - Post#2719954    
    In response to gsnort

If your windshield has frost the oil in your engine has frost as well ( told to me by a reputable engine builder)

The magnetic block heaters work ( used them last week on two forklifts that would not start after being left out in minus 30 celcius weather.

Best are frost plug block heater as has been stated.

If you plan on letting the car sleep all winter, best to pull the plugs squirt some oil in the cylinders , thread the plugs back in loose, then in the spring pull the plugs squirt some oil in the cylinders again and fire it up.

As has been stated idleing an engine in winter promotes wear as at idle you don’t build proper oil pressure and the pistons can scuff etc.


Had a diesel vw years ago that would not start in the winter unless it was plugged in.

It also had a oil heater that was a dip stick, remove the oem dip stick and put this thing in its place, nice easy idea



" The chain in those handcuffs is made of high tensile steel. It will take you ten minutes to hack through it with this, if your lucky. You can hack through your ankle in fivei



In the land of the blind the one eyed man is king 👑


 
2blu52 
"17th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 18570
2blu52
Age: 85
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
01-04-18 07:55 AM - Post#2719956    
    In response to VANDENPLAS

"It also had a oil heater that was a dip stick, remove the oem dip stick and put this thing in its place, nice easy idea"
Did not work on my 62 Corvair.

"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27768
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
01-04-18 01:49 PM - Post#2720002    
    In response to hand123

I have used both a dipstick heater and an expansion plug heater and have found the expansion plug heater to perform significantly better. Both of these were on the same car in similar weather, so I believe the comparison to be valid.

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
johnwd98 
Contributor
Posts: 294
johnwd98
Age: 69
Loc: Little Falls, MN
Reg: 09-05-10
01-05-18 08:17 AM - Post#2720090    
    In response to raycow

Of all the different devices I've used to preheat an engine, an expansion plug or freeze plug type was always the best. I don't know if this is still true but, not long ago, on a new car we could get a "Cold Weather Option", that included an expansion plug block heater installed at the factory.

1950 Fleetline, 350 TBI, 700R4, 3.73 posi rear Blazer axle, MII front. Remote door and trunk locks, GM cruise control, A/C,


 
tommy49 
"4th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2391
tommy49
Loc: Kaleva, Michigan
Reg: 09-28-12
01-05-18 09:48 AM - Post#2720106    
    In response to johnwd98

  • johnwd98 Said:
Of all the different devices I've used to preheat an engine, an expansion plug or freeze plug type was always the best. I don't know if this is still true but, not long ago, on a new car we could get a "Cold Weather Option", that included an expansion plug block heater installed at the factory.



The freeze plug block heater is a option on GM trucks. I have one, but I've been too lazy to put it in. After this winter, it's going in!!


Tommy

49 Deluxe Sport Coupe, 55 235, 700r4, Blazer rear axle, 4 wheel power disc brakes.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tommyfortynine /album...



 
Dean50 
"12th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 1282
Dean50
Loc: Detroit area
Reg: 01-02-07
01-06-18 08:32 PM - Post#2720287    
    In response to tommy49

Hi Tommy and Happy New Year.
Yep, we were due for a lousy winter after a couple "easy" ones. Oh well, Autorama will be here soon.

Dean50



 
ragtp66 
Contributor
Posts: 691
ragtp66
Reg: 12-09-07
01-12-18 11:42 PM - Post#2720913    
    In response to hand123

I used to use one of these on an old pick up http://katsblockheater.com/block-heaters/all/15- in...
Side benefit is you have great heat as soon as you start it up.

During the winter I use Fogging oil, the same stuff we use to winterize the boat and jet skis, it keeps the cylinders lubricated and prevents rust formation. Over the winter twice a month I rotate the crank about 3/4 of a turn. Keep things free and its good for the valves springs to not let them sit in one position for an extended period. Definitely better to leave it sit over the winter as has been previously stated. Disconnect the battery as well. Even a non operation clock draws enough power over time to kill a battery.

Toys:
1958 Impala 2dr Hardtop Under Construction
1966 Chevelle Malibu Convert M20/350 Aztec Bronze
1987 Sea Ray Pachanga 22
2002 Cadillac Escalade EXT Parts chaser
2007 Trailblazer SS -gone and missed


 
Stinky 
Senior Member
Posts: 1604

Loc: Whitewater, CO
Reg: 05-25-01
01-13-18 07:16 AM - Post#2720930    
    In response to ragtp66

My grandfather used to say that he would build a fire under the car...he was talking about Model As N Ts....which had no forced lubrication. They are sort of a dif animal.





 

Chevs of the 40s

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