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Username Post: Welding ss side trim        (Topic#347244)
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-20-17 02:42 PM - Post#2708270    

I have a 57 chevy and need to trim a couple of pieces of ss door trim and need to weld back the ends after cutting them. Any recommendations on this? Thanks



 

acardon 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11020
acardon
Loc: DFW TEXAS
Reg: 03-25-05
09-20-17 03:43 PM - Post#2708277    
    In response to BG

Tig and lots of experience.

Don
66 Corvair (driving)
57 2dr HT (driving)
56 2dr HT (waiting to be restored)


 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27383
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
09-20-17 04:27 PM - Post#2708282    
    In response to acardon

The stainless on my 55 is only about .015" thick. You need to be very good with a tig welder and have a machine with excellent control. You'll need a tiny tungsten. You won't be able to weld gaps or holes very well if at all.

If you have to use filler material, select the alloy carefully, perhaps after some trial welding. I saw a writeup somewhere on what alloy the trim is, with a comment that some filler material will be different color than the parent material.





 
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-20-17 04:41 PM - Post#2708285    
    In response to Rick_L

I've done lots of tig welding on ss but it was 16-20 gage and this trim is alot thinner. I have my own small mig but need info on a small tig, the ones i used was at the shop I used to work at! I read somewhere that silver soldering might work?



 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27383
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
09-20-17 04:47 PM - Post#2708287    
    In response to BG

With silver soldering, color of the filler will almost undoubtedly be an issue.

Can you find some good used replacements instead? The door trim is not that hard to find, and while it will need polishing, it's still not all that expensive.



 
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-21-17 07:01 PM - Post#2708448    
    In response to Rick_L

Any small tigs worth having?



 
Lee T 
Contributor
Posts: 161

Reg: 07-05-12
09-22-17 03:52 AM - Post#2708477    
    In response to BG

I have had a Miller Max Star 150 for 15 years with no problems at all. Its small, inexpensive, and does light duty work very well, but it won't weld alum.



 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27383
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
09-22-17 12:54 PM - Post#2708530    
    In response to BG

BG, what do you mean by "small"? Small size? Small budget? Small capability?

I have a Thermal Arc 185. It's physically small (it's an inverter unit), but will weld up to 200A with a limited duty cycle. They no longer make that exact model, but do have some similar units. Not particularly cheap, but less than a Miller with similar specs.



 
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-25-17 02:21 PM - Post#2708815    
    In response to Rick_L

I'm really needing it for doing this trim, is there any low cost under 500.00 that would do it? I might need to find someone to weld them up for me. Thanks



 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27383
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
09-25-17 06:08 PM - Post#2708844    
    In response to BG

You're not going to find an under $500 tig welder that will do the job.

Best to look for someone who might do the job - but finding some OEM trim to use that doesn't require welding is probably cheaper even if it needs straightening and polishing.



 
models916 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4781

Age: 67
Loc: Addison, IL
Reg: 05-28-10
09-26-17 04:53 AM - Post#2708878    
    In response to Rick_L

New design in TIG uses an inverter instead of a transformer. It results in a drastic cost reduction with no loss of performance. I have one of these and have no complaints if used for light duty and small parts.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_20 0...




 
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-26-17 04:20 PM - Post#2708948    
    In response to models916

Anyone use the Harbor freight 399.99 tig?



 
models916 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4781

Age: 67
Loc: Addison, IL
Reg: 05-28-10
09-27-17 05:12 AM - Post#2709001    
    In response to BG

It's all just an electric arc. The cost difference is the voltage to operate and the duty cycle it can operate at. Consumables for TIG are expensive.



 
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-27-17 02:36 PM - Post#2709037    
    In response to models916

Do you use the tig function if so how hard is it to start the arc?what torch are you using?



 
models916 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4781

Age: 67
Loc: Addison, IL
Reg: 05-28-10
09-28-17 06:03 AM - Post#2709092    
    In response to BG

I've used the TIG. Has a bit of a learning curve for the cheap torch. This thing is for small projects. Just practice before you jump to the real thing. You will also need a bottle and gas plus the consumables.



 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27383
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
09-28-17 07:06 PM - Post#2709168    
    In response to models916

Keep in mind that welding material this thin is a much bigger deal than even the usual thin body panels. It's not a beginner tig project.



 
BG 
Contributor
Posts: 691

Reg: 09-12-07
09-29-17 06:08 AM - Post#2709189    
    In response to Rick_L

I've tig welded for years but not ss this thin. I'm wondering if one of these cheap machines wiil do the thin ss. I know it would take some practice, just about like learning all over again.



 
models916 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4781

Age: 67
Loc: Addison, IL
Reg: 05-28-10
10-03-17 07:12 AM - Post#2709617    
    In response to BG

It's the heavy stuff the cheap machines have trouble with. Also no foot pedal just a dial for the amps.



 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27383
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
10-03-17 12:56 PM - Post#2709649    
    In response to models916

Not always true.

The Miller Econotig has a minimum amperage of 30 amps - way too much for this job. Plus the pedal control is 30A to maximum, and the dial is disabled when you plug in the pedal. I'm sure other cheaper machines are this way or similar. A good machine can be turned down to 5 amps on the dial, and if you set the amps on the dial to say 25A, then the pedal control can modulate between 5A and 25A. Far better.

The usual rule of thumb is 1 amp per .001" metal thickness. So the .015" trim needs around 15A, and that's probably maximum.



 
models916 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4781

Age: 67
Loc: Addison, IL
Reg: 05-28-10
10-04-17 08:09 AM - Post#2709737    
    In response to Rick_L

The Klutch min is 20. No option for pedal. This is a hobby welder can only do so much for the money. I bought mine for welding headers.



 

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