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Username Post: what is this box thing on the drivers side of the engine bay?        (Topic#346360)
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 01:47 PM - Post#2702512    

https://ibb.co/kdazH5

the box container with a line connected to it?

my truck doesn't have power brakes, so what is it?

could it be a hydraulic clutch fluid reservoir or something?

I thought my truck had a mechanical clutch in it. My aunts husband told me he thought it was a mechanical clutch.



Edited by Eric_Gary132 on 12-14-17 04:26 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Ecklers

raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27764
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
08-02-17 03:27 PM - Post#2702529    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

Where in the picture is the black box to which you are referring? Could you please shoot another pic closer to the area in question?

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 03:57 PM - Post#2702532    
    In response to raycow

I drew an arrow and circled the box thing in question in red.


I cannot take another photo right now because its over at my grandfathers house.

https://ibb.co/kdazH5



Edited by Eric132 on 08-02-17 04:17 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 04:18 PM - Post#2702533    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

it is a master cylinder. for the brakes. I see that it has the orig engine side mounts that came with an a/t in that year
ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 04:23 PM - Post#2702534    
    In response to sidworks

so it came with it even though it does not have power brakes?

why would it have a master cylinder if there's no power brakes?



Edited by Eric132 on 08-02-17 04:38 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 04:32 PM - Post#2702535    
    In response to sidworks

here is your picture back and I have cropped it to lacalize where your linkage is if you can get a decent picture or 2. 1 from above and 1 from below. right behind the alt. at the frame should be where it all comes together. the is a rod coming thru the firewall that goes down to the bellcrank. it should be beneficial to us to see that as that may be the root of the problem

ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


 
steve65 
"3rd Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 702
steve65
Age: 60
Loc: new westminster bc
Reg: 09-25-13
08-02-17 05:13 PM - Post#2702541    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

You need a master cylinder regardless if it has power brakes or not. The master cylinder hold the hydraulic brake fluid that your brake pedal pumps to the the four corners of the braking system. That one steel line that's coming out the bottom goes to a distribution block mounted on the frame that splits it to the front and rear.

Steve Duncan
65 Impala SS Convertible
Ermine White/ Black Top
357 4 spd auto

www.picturetrail.com/steved65


 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 05:26 PM - Post#2702550    
    In response to steve65

Ok, thanks for the info.



 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 05:32 PM - Post#2702552    
    In response to sidworks

Ron, the rod on my truck is rubbing against the firewall

Which I know cannot be a factory miatake. Someone converted this truck to a manuel I think.

The clutch pedal is pretty tough to use and I'm not sure if that is the reason?

The clutch pedal Gives a ton of resistance to the point that my leg will shake when using it.



Edited by Eric132 on 08-02-17 06:39 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 06:19 PM - Post#2702563    
    In response to sidworks

https://ibb.co/dGDuZk





 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 07:15 PM - Post#2702574    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

I think that z/bar is whacko in there. I am waiting for a couple of pictures to sync over from my camera to my computer. sometimes it is not instant. I took a couple of a Z/bar for a 63-6 and how it should be situated. I will post when they are ready
ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 07:23 PM - Post#2702576    
    In response to sidworks

Sorry for my newbie question. What do you mean by z/bar? What is that?



 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 07:56 PM - Post#2702582    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

this is a picture of the z/bar and how it should be positioned if you were standing directly in front of it if you were standing on the drivers side

this is a picture of it if you standing over it facing the firewall just the the bar itself should be somewhat level instead of laying down on the r/side.

that rod coming thru the firewall should be more perpendicular. so when it is hooked up and you depress the clutch pedal it pulls that lever up which in effects pushes the bottom lever back and disengages the clutch.
there is a lever which mounts on the end of the clutch shaft under the dash which at the other end is the clutch pedal. I believe that it is on backwards so that the rod that goes thru the firewall is pushing instead of pulling. that lever facing upwards and forwards is in the wrong location. it also doesn't appear to have a good travel.
what you should have is a stock z/bar 63-6 chev and the proper rod between there and the clutch pedal bracket under the dash and turn that lever around so that when the clutch pedal is depressed that rod ulls uphill instead of down.
that rod now that goes thru the f/wall is rubbing on the topside of it as it is forced so far forward to meet that lever that it is now connected to
lot of words to follow
I think that is way that it all goes
ron


http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


Edited by sidworks on 08-02-17 07:59 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 08:01 PM - Post#2702583    
    In response to sidworks

ron, heres a better pic

https://ibb.co/kwMRfQ

My truck is a 62 though, rather than 63-66. not sure if that makes a difference though.

Should I have the shop fix this issue that you are describing?





Edited by Eric132 on 08-02-17 08:06 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 08:04 PM - Post#2702586    
    In response to sidworks

here is another solution and that is to install an hydraulic clutch setup and you can convert to power brakes and or discs
this fellow makes a good setup. he is also a member of this forum
http://www.67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/showthread....
ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 08:13 PM - Post#2702589    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

  • Eric132 Said:
ron, heres a better pic

https://ibb.co/kwMRfQ

My truck is a 62 though, rather than 63-66. not sure if that makes a difference though.

Should I have the shop fix this issue that you described?




they didn't make a manual linkage for a 60-62 so you have to use the later setup in there to make it work
as to who should do it, that depends on how deep your pockets around. but I believe if you are to keep the truck then perhaps it is time to get your hands dirty and begin to learn. this would not be that difficult and there are people here to help if you get stuck. you are ggoing to have to chase down the parts.
the reason that i had said a z/bar from a 63-6 chev is that you do not want one from a gmc that had a V6 in it as they are differnet, but one from a GMC with a 230,250 or a 292 I6 would be right
ron


http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-02-17 08:22 PM - Post#2702592    
    In response to sidworks

this is how it all goes together but they do not sell a new z/ar or that upper linkage rod that goes thru the firewall. thy have to be found used and they should be rebuilt as those holes in the z/bar get worn out and the ends on that rod get worn and should be built back up. all that wear means slop.
if you are going to have a shop do it I would go with the capatainfabs setup as everything can be sourced new and you shouldn't have to pay mechanics to scratch their backsides trying to understand the mechanical linkage and at the same time upgrading yours brakes
again this all depends on the depth of your pocket. you could do it with a little coaching
ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


Edited by sidworks on 08-02-17 08:24 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-02-17 09:04 PM - Post#2702594    
    In response to sidworks

I'm not planning on doing any brake upgrades at the moment. My other thread was just out of curiosity if anyone drives without them.

Thanks for all the help so far. Much appreciated.





Edited by Eric132 on 08-03-17 06:27 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Nitroholic 
"14th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 297
Nitroholic
Loc: Out West In SoCal
Reg: 05-08-03
08-03-17 10:15 AM - Post#2702659    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

Here's a link to an excellent site which would help you get a basic understanding on how all of the systems on a motor vehicle function.
Each repair section starts off with sort of a primer on the subject matter.

http://www.aa1car.com/index_alphabetical.htm

'66 C-10 Short Fleetside Big Window



 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27764
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
08-03-17 10:31 AM - Post#2702662    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

Ron is giving you good advice all the way down the line.

We are now getting into the root cause of your basic problem. The PO who did the auto to manual conversion could have done a much better job of it. Instead of using the correct hydraulic linkage parts from a 60-62 truck, which would have been a bolt-in, he went with the mechanical linkage from a later year truck and botched the installation. This doesn't mean you can't use mechanical linkage, but it has to be done right or else you will end up with the kind of problems you are having now.

If you want to stay with the mechanical linkage, I strongly suggest you get a shop manual for 63-66 so you can see what the linkage is supposed to look like and straighten it out yourself. You can't really expect a shop which has no knowledge of the truck's history to clean up the PO's mistakes.

Alternatively, you could look for the stock 60-62 clutch linkage parts and do the swap the way it should have been done in the first place.

I realize that some of this may sound harsh, but you have gotten into a problem which won't be going away by itself and which could be expensive to sort out at current repair shop rates. Definitely take care of the clutch linkage before you begin on the trans because you may find that once the clutch gets fixed the trans problem is also resolved.

Just my 2 cents worth, but I'm old, so you have to consider inflation on that 2 cents.

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-03-17 10:48 AM - Post#2702664    
    In response to raycow

  • raycow Said:
Ron is giving you good info all the way down the line.

We are now getting into the root cause of your basic problem. The PO who did the auto to manual conversion could have done a much better job of it. Instead of using the correct hydraulic linkage parts from a 60-62 truck, which would have been a bolt-in, he went with the mechanical linkage from a later year truck and botched the installation. This doesn't mean you can't use mechanical linkage, but it has to be done right or else you will end up with the kind of problems you are having now.

If you want to stay with the mechanical linkage, I strongly suggest you get a shop manual for 63-66 so you can see what the linkage is supposed to look like and straighten it out yourself. You can't really expect a shop which has no knowledge of the truck's history to clean up the PO's mistakes.

Alternatively, you could look for the 60-62 clutch linkage parts and do the swap the way it should have been done in the first place.

I realize that some of this may sound harsh, but you have gotten into a problem which is not going to fix itself and which could be expensive to sort out at current repair shop rates. Definitely take care of the clutch linkage before you begin on the trans because you may find that once the clutch is fixed the trans problem also goes away.

Just my 2 cents worth, but I'm old, so you have to consider inflation on that 2 cents.

Ray


thanks Ray. when I suggested a hydraulic clutch setup for this application I was just referring to use what b/housing that hes has and installing a slave cyl and a actuating rod; much simpler and using captainfab's adaptor and setup, it would remove a lot of the B?S that is there now
actually he doesn't have to use that adaptor but just install the original double cyl master for both brakes and clutch. just run a fluid line down to a slave. even simpler
ron


http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


Edited by sidworks on 08-03-17 10:51 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
jktucker92 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 209
jktucker92
Reg: 02-05-17
08-03-17 10:57 AM - Post#2702665    
    In response to raycow

One other issue you may end up having is related to the plug wire routing. From your picture, the plug wires run over the top of the rams horn exhaust manifolds. It appears as they are touching the manifolds, which will eventually burn through the insulation and cause a misfire.
From the factory, engines with rams horn manifolds route the plug wires down the back of the block, along the oil pan flange, and up to the spark plugs.
The simple thing to do is somehow hold the plug wires off the manifolds with some sort of plug wire holder. I've seen people just zip tie the wires to the brake line to keep them from melting.
If you want to put it to a stock condition, you'll need plug wires for 60-66 Truck with a 283. They will have 4 wires that are very long in order to route below the engine to cylinders 1,2,3, and 4. There are clips that bolt to the engine on the oil pan flange that hold the plug wires tight to the block.



 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27764
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
08-03-17 11:04 AM - Post#2702666    
    In response to sidworks

Yes Ron, your plan would definitely work. You could use an aftermarket slave on the present bellhousing and cobble a mounting bracket for it if necessary. Also, you might want to check with one of the adapter outfits like Advance or Novak. They sell a slave for Jeep engine swaps that will bolt to a stock GM mechanical linkage bellhousing.

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-03-17 02:26 PM - Post#2702686    
    In response to raycow

not much to fab a bracket to mount the slave and mount it right off the bell housing to the block bolts
https://www.google.ca/search?q=clutch+slave+ mounti...
ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


Edited by sidworks on 08-03-17 02:28 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
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Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-03-17 02:33 PM - Post#2702689    
    In response to raycow

Ray, this is something I was thinking of possibly doing though I'm not yet sure of it.

how difficult would it be to convert the truck back to a powerglide/automatic tranmsisson? And if I didn't do it myself, how much do you think it would cost for someone else to do it??

Since that is most likely what kind of tranmsisson it was originally designed with out of the factory?

it already has an automatic radiator in there and a hole side of the steering wheel column for a shifter and an automatic indicator that one of the former owners left on there.

Another clue it was originally an automatic is the clutch spring was running right through the brake master cylinder line.

That cannot be a factory mistake.

https://ibb.co/cuc1hF

https://ibb.co/h8jE2F



Edited by Eric132 on 08-03-17 07:05 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
raycow 
Honored Member
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raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
08-03-17 06:25 PM - Post#2702717    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

IMO, that would be a lose-lose proposition all the way around. Just keep in mind what you would be giving up in reliability and performance. Don't you think the PO knew it would be a lot less work to get the PG fixed instead of converting to a 4 speed? You really can't blame the manual trans for your problems just because the person who installed it was a klutz who had no clue what he was doing.

As for the difficulties you are having with the mechanical linkage now, those will go away when you convert to hydraulic as recommended by Ron.

Please put your geographic location on your profile. We may have someone nearby who would be willing to look at your truck and offer specific advice after seeing your actual installation. I know I would do it if you lived close to me.

Ray

Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
Eric_Gary132 
Contributor
Posts: 279

Loc: northern California
Reg: 01-27-17
08-03-17 08:05 PM - Post#2702732    
    In response to raycow

I respect your stance, but the second to last owner was a farmer and these heavy duty Manuel trans are meant for that kind of abuse and work. Not what I intend to use the truck for.


Somehow, I don't feel they're suited or practical for regular daily driving or cruising around. Which the last owner encountered and didn't drive it much.

and on my other thread, I think you told me that the farmer saw the benefits of a Manuel trans for his needs on a farm and that's why he chose it.

also, there's the possibility that the original auto trans went out and he got a good deal on the sm465 and so he went with that, as you mentioned to me on my other thread.

But, it was for his needs and I'm not a farmer. So, that wouldn't apply to me.

I live in a populated suburban area. not rural. So now that I think about it, Id prefer converting it back to automatic.

BUT, if I did live in a rural area I would be okay with a heavy duty Manuel trans.

And besides all that, making it automatic again would be original to this truck as I'm 95 percent sure that's how it came into life. So if I were to get my hands dirty or put out money, it would most likely be to put it back to an automatic.

1. Automatic radiator
2. Automaitc indicator https://ibb.co/cuc1hF
3. Shifter hole on side of the steering column.
https://ibb.co/h8jE2F
4. Clutch spring was running right through the brake master cylinder line. Factory wouldn't do this.

5. The rod rubs against the firewall and looks pretty sloppy as if someone used a hammer to make a hole for it, a mistake no GM factory would ever make.

I think all the connections are still in there for the conversion back to an auto trans as she was meant to be, except the bellhousing and whatever else was changed.

This is my stance on my truck.


Any suggestions on which auto trans I could fit into a 62 truck? Other than the original powerglide?

I saw a guy on YouTube with an automatic 62 c20 and it shifted more than twice so that can't be the powerglide trans. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chevaQqYMu8

I'm not sure of it yet as I like learning to drive manuel, but this kind of setup was never meant to be in this truck from what you guys have told me and the evidence I have seen of it being a rare automatic.



Edited by Eric132 on 08-04-17 08:59 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
jktucker92 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 209
jktucker92
Reg: 02-05-17
08-04-17 11:39 AM - Post#2702797    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

I know that in the 60's the Powerglide was not highly regarded. However, my '66 Impala had 265,000 miles on the original powerglide when I rebuilt it in the 80's. Perhaps on a farm truck, they had issues, but mine was fine. Installing a Powerglide back in the truck would be the easiest automatic to put it. Of course, there are many other options. The TH350 and TH400 are both relatively easy to install. Each has its unique challenges. For any automatic behind a carbureted engine, there is some sort of kick down mechanism. On a Powerglide, it's typically a mechanical linkage that's probably hard to find. For the TH350, they're generally cable operated, and there are plenty of stock and aftermarket options, depending on the carburetor. For the TH400, you need an electronic kickdown switch that is often triggered by the gas pedal. For any of them, you'll have to do something about a shifter. It sounds like you have an automatic column in your truck, but you're going to be missing some pieces and they may be hard to find. They do have aftermarket column and floor shifters that will work, but they aren't cheap.
As to which automatic, that depends a lot on use. The TH350 is fine for light use, but the TH400 is definately stronger. The Powerglide is on par with the TH350 if built correctly. Having driven an Impala with a Powerglide, the only downside is off the line acceleration. Once the car got up to 30mph, it accelerated pretty well. One other relatively easy option is the TH700R4. It's a 4 speed overdrive, and probably as easy to install as a TH350. If you want highway cruising, the overdrive is really nice.
One thing I'd caution you about is using the radiator as is. If the ports for the transmission weren't plugged, they're probably full of dirt that you don't want in your newly installed transmission. Even if they were plugged, the radiator is obviously old (since it predates the tranny swap), and should probably be cleaned at a minimum.



 
sidworks 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3506

Age: 73
Loc: Sidney, B.C.
Reg: 12-03-05
08-04-17 11:54 AM - Post#2702800    
    In response to jktucker92

what you are referring to is the aluminum p/g. the one from a 62 was the cast iron p/g
ron

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?208929-...
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?220902-...
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156542-...


 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 27764
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
08-04-17 12:20 PM - Post#2702804    
    In response to Eric_Gary132

Eric, I can't argue with most of what you are saying. It's your truck, and you are absolutely entitled to build it the way you want. After all, you are the one who will be driving it.

The only point I would take issue with is "this kind of setup was never meant to be in this truck from what you guys have told me and the evidence I have seen of it being a rare automatic".

To make it as clear as possible, a manual trans was not "never meant to be" in your truck. Don't forget that a manual was a factory option and GM built a lot more trucks that way than with a Powerglide. The only thing wrong with your truck is that the PO just plain screwed up badly when he did the conversion. If he had done the job properly, you probably wouldn't be here on the forum right now.

Another point that you may have the wrong idea about is that the PG is just going to fall into place and make everything exactly as it was when the truck left the factory in 1962. It's not going to happen like that, and here again you have the PO to blame. This is because he removed a lot of parts you will need to make the PG work properly and possibly modified other parts which are still on the truck. As part of the PG install, you will need to replace most or all of those missing or modified parts. In this area, the rarity of the PG is going to work against you, because those parts may not be easy to find.

Lastly, before I get back to your original question, it is evident that you do not have the original engine, and so far you have given us no indication about what kind of engine is in there now. GM changed a lot of engine details over the last 55 years and some of those details could make a difference in how the next transmission goes in.

Ok, to move on, your question about what kind of automatic to install is a good one. Since the engine means that you aren't going to be doing a stock resto, you have at least 4 general types of transmission to choose from:

1. A cast iron PG. This is what originally came in your truck. These transmissions may be scarce in trucks, but they are not scarce. GM made millions of them. This will very likely be the easiest to install provided you can replace all of the original parts the PO removed and also make whatever accommodations are necessary because of your later engine

2. An aluminum PG. This is a modernized and improved version of the PG first used in some 62 cars and in everything else with a PG for about 10 years after that. This is not a bolt-in swap for the cast iron PG because there are a lot of detail differences. Most people feel it is a better trans than the CI version, but it may not be worth the extra work to install because it still has only two speeds.

3. A 3 speed automatic. This will usually be a TH350 or a TH400. Either of these will be a genuine step up from any PG because you will definitely notice the performance improvement resulting from 3 speeds instead of 2. They have no real downside other than being slightly more difficult to install than the aluminum PG. As for choosing between the two, the 400 is larger and heavier than the 350, but in stock form will have better long term durability than the 350 at any given power level. Either trans can be "built" to handle more power, and then the sky is the limit provided you have the $ to spend.

4. A 4 speed overdrive automatic. You have several choices here, but unless you want to go with computer control you would probably choose either a TH200-4R or a TH700-R4. Now you are getting into some really significant gains. The OD gives you better fuel mileage as well as more comfortable highway driving because of reduced engine rpm. You get a converter lockup clutch which also helps fuel mileage and additionally keeps the trans oil cooler by eliminating converter slippage when the clutch is engaged. This can make a big difference in transmission life. Downsides are additional complication and more difficult installation than the 3 speeds. You have a throttle valve cable with a critical adjustment which can cause early trans failure if you get it wrong. You also have to deal with an electrical hookup which is needed in order for the converter clutch to work.

I have to go out for a while, but the above might give you something to think about until I get back and you may have some questions by then. In the meantime, others will likely chime in and offer additional info.

Ray


Those who choose an automatic transmission want transportation. Those who choose a manual transmission want to drive.


 
Ecklers

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