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Ecklers AutoMotive
Username Post: Servicing Power Seat Transmission        (Topic#307536)
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2948

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
01-25-14 01:55 PM - Post#2420185    

In this first picture, you can see that I have marked the location of the cables in regard to location on the transmission. This is an important step, because if you don't have the cables in there proper location, the seat switch will not function as designed.

Next is to remove the cable retainers on both sides of the transmission. Note that there are 2 yellow cables. This is because one is a replacement. The cable colors determine the lengths of the cables. There are a total of 3 colors and 6 lengths.





Note that the cable end are in poor condition, so they will be either repaired or replaced, depending on availability and amount of damage. The terminal connector on this transmission is also damaged, and a replacement isn't available but it is still serviceable as is.

Here you can see the transmission with the cables and cable retainer removed. There are 2 screws that hold the cables onto the transmission.



Here I have separated the two halves of the transmission, for inspection, cleaning, and repair. There are a total of 3 screws that hold the two halves of this assembly together. Once removed, the halves separate easily. You can also see that sand has infiltrated the unit, and if not completely removed, it will destroy the plastic gears.



In this picture, I have marked the gears locations with a black marker. There is one small gear, and 2 larger gears which are identical.





Edited by 427SS65 on 12-09-18 04:16 PM. Reason for edit: Make sticky

 
Ecklers AutoMotive
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2948

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
01-25-14 02:07 PM - Post#2420187    
    In response to junky

Next, I have removed the gear, shaft, cog, and spring assemblies as a unit. All parts are the same except for the gears, so you don't have to be concerned about getting them mixed up. There is a plastic thrust washer on each of the cogs, so be careful not to loose this small part. It can barely be seen and appears to be part of the cog until you clean the parts, where it will probably fall off. Clean the metal parts in a solvent to remove the hardened grease. I cleaned the gears with dish washing solution and a tooth brush. I found that there was some rust on the shafts, so I polished that off using grade # 0000 steel wool.





Next is the transmission solenoid that needs to be cleaned. You will note that the clutch shaft cap and plunger assembly has hardened grease and rust on it. This requires that they be cleaned, and polished using the steel wool.



The last picture shows the shaft that connects the motor to the transmission, and drives the gears. I had to spray the shaft with a penetrating oil to get it out of its bore. Once removed, it was cleaned with dish washing liquid, and showed no signs of wear, other than having hardened grease on it.



I washed both case halves in dish washing liquid, rinsed well, and dried with a paper towel. Below is a picture of some of the cleaned parts prior to reassembly. I reassembled everything giving it a coat of light petroleum jelly (Vaseline). GM had originally used a lithium grease, but it tends to harden with age, so I don't use it usually.



Reassembly is pretty much straight forward. Just put it back together the way that it came apart.


Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


Edited by 427SS65 on 05-18-18 06:11 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2948

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
01-25-14 02:11 PM - Post#2420190    
    In response to junky

If you are interested in servicing the seat track mechanism, I mistakenly posted that in the 1965 - 1966 forum, however, here is a link to it. Possibly a moderator can move it to this forum where it belongs. thanks Junky Link

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


 
kingkreeton 
"6th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1309
kingkreeton
Loc: Houston TX
Reg: 04-15-11
01-26-14 05:44 AM - Post#2420347    
    In response to junky

Excellent tutorial, thanks for posting it.

Shane
64 Impala SS:
Chevy Performance 350HO
4 Speed Muncie

Proud member of Big Blue Nation, University of Kentucky Basketball. "Go Big Blue"


 
dcairns 
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 2054
dcairns
Loc: Orange CA
Reg: 11-07-03
01-26-14 08:12 AM - Post#2420380    
    In response to kingkreeton

Nice write up!!!

- Dave
1964 Impala 4-door sedan

_________
/ --------------- \
_/ /___________\ \_
/_________|_________\
|OOO ___________ OOO|
\______|====|______/
|_|------------------|_|




 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2948

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
08-02-18 08:15 AM - Post#2741768    
    In response to junky

This is a post that I made 5 years ago, and thought that I would bring it back for new members to view. I have been fixing pictures in my posts, since the original pictures were gone due to the hosting company going out of business.

Also, check out the post that I made in the 65-66 Forum on how to rebuild the Power Seat Actuators, which are the pieces that move the seat track.
Link



 
Swifster 
Poster
Posts: 58

Loc: Bradenton, FL
Reg: 05-26-18
08-05-18 03:07 PM - Post#2742033    
    In response to junky

The post needs to be included in the Reference area. This and a few others give very detailed information but they languish in the regular posts. This was a great post.

Tom

1963 Chevrolet ?
$121.00


 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2948

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
12-09-18 12:51 PM - Post#2753994    
    In response to Swifster

I have another one to rebuild, and I had to go hunting to find this post, just to refresh my memory. This "bump" post is also so I don't have to search for it later today, in the event that I come up with additional information.

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


 
junky 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2948

Loc: Northeast CT
Reg: 06-27-10
12-09-18 08:20 PM - Post#2754023    
    In response to junky

This particular transmission is out of a 1962 Chevrolet BelAir with bench seat. Upon opening it, I found that the steel shafts have rusted, causing the unit to malfunction.



Since I had to remove the rust inside of the tubes that the shafts go through, I used a cut piece of 000 steel wool. I wadded it up, and pushed it into the tube with a twisting motion, and rotated it till it came out the other end. This dislodged most of the rust. I think that a better way to clean the tubes might be a gun cleaning kit.



Once I had the tubes cleaned, I then attacked the shafts with a Brillo steel wool soap pad, and got them clean enough to work. I also put a light coating of grease on these shafts. On this transmission, I found that the original white lithium grease was still working, so I used the same grease on the cleaned parts.



Once I had everything cleaned and lubricated, I turned my attention to the heart of the unit. The 3 electrical solenoids that cause the parts to move when power is applied. For this, I used an ohm meter. I am less concerned with the total resistance, then I would be with an open in the solenoid. When you have a bad solenoid, it needs to be replaced, since repair is seldom successful.



This picture shows the unit right before I screwed it back together.



Finally, comes the real test. Putting power to each solenoid. I had to do this out in the garage, and it is difficult to do this when the temperatures are in the 20's. For this reason, I have made a simulated "battery", and show how I tested this.



I hope that this tutorial will give you the confidence to tackle the power seat, and restore it to just like new. Need help, just PM me, and I will give you whatever assistance you need.

Junky...

Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level, then beat you with experience.


Edited by junky on 12-09-18 08:22 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
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