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Username Post: 265 Oiling System Problem        (Topic#242923)
4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4735

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
05-30-10 05:28 PM - Post#1922944    



We encountered a no oil to the rockers problem the other day even though the idiot light would come on and go off normaly. Is the little 1/4" block plug in front r.s. a lifter galley plug that we could use for a gauge read
We looked for an oil path diagram with no luck in 3 or 4 books.
It had a recent valve job so the valve covers were clean and had been adjusted recently. They all rattled.
The search feature here on CT continues to baffle me so I posted here although I bet there are a number of pictures stashed away in the archives...some where
Thanks!

Stanley



It's all good. Mostly


 


Gene_Schneider 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 12290

Loc: Wisconsin..USA
Reg: 09-27-02
05-30-10 07:12 PM - Post#1922992    
    In response to 4dr 57

Did you change the distributor or cam just prior to the loss of oil?
The 1955 and 1956 engines feed the oil to the lifters and rocker arms from an oil gallert at the rear cam bearing. The is a notch in the cam journal that meters the flow of the oil through the block in a gallery that goes from lifter to lifter.

ChevGene 1934 Master sedan 1939 Master DeLuxe Town Sedan 1950 Styline DeLuxe Power Glide 1957 Nomad 283 PG 1963 Corvair Convertible


Edited by Gene_Schneider on 05-30-10 07:16 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
overdrive 
Senior Member
Posts: 1304
overdrive
Loc: N.E. Mo
Reg: 02-17-03
05-30-10 07:15 PM - Post#1922993    
    In response to 4dr 57

  • Quote:
Is the little 1/4" block plug in front r.s. a lifter galley plug that we could use for a gauge read



Yes.



http://www.picturetrail.com/57overdrive
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4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4735

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
05-31-10 05:04 AM - Post#1923109    
    In response to overdrive

Gene_ Schineider - yes G_S I noticed a mallory unit where the stock points distributor previously resided. The owner also says he had a familiar local race shop (now O.O.B.) change the cam and R&R the intake with an eddy one, however that was 25,000 miles ago. Thanks Gene


overdrive - Thanks



It's all good. Mostly


 
Farm boy 
Contributor
Posts: 451
Farm boy
Loc: Central California
Reg: 11-03-07
05-31-10 09:34 AM - Post#1923194    
    In response to overdrive

  • overdrive Said:
  • Quote:
Is the little 1/4" block plug in front r.s. a lifter galley plug that we could use for a gauge read



Yes.





No. The plug is connected to the main oil gallery, not the lifter gallery.

Steve
1967 Camaro
1956 Bel Air


 
Farm boy 
Contributor
Posts: 451
Farm boy
Loc: Central California
Reg: 11-03-07
05-31-10 09:47 AM - Post#1923201    
    In response to 4dr 57

When I got my 265 back from the machine shop the camshaft would not go all the way in. The machine shop installed a common 2 inch freeze plug instead of the correct 2 1/64” shallow rear cam plug. The back of the camshaft was hitting the freeze plug! The thrust surface on the cam sprocket is supposed to ride against the machined surface at the front of the block to correctly position the camshaft. I knocked out the incorrect freeze plug and test fit the camshaft with the sprocket installed. It’s a good thing I checked because I found that they had also installed the cam bearing almost ¼ inch too far back. The back oil hole in the cam bearing was completely blocked of by the camshaft. If I had installed the engine as the machine shop had built it there would have been zero oil supply to the lifters.

Just lining up the rear cam bearing holes to the block is not good enough on a 265. The bearing must also line up with the rear journal of the camshaft to ensure that both holes line up with the machined slot in the camshaft. The best way to check the position of the rear cam bearing is to test fit the bearing on the camshaft before you install it in the block. After you install the cam bearings, bolt the cam sprocket on the camshaft and test fit the camshaft into the block. The back edge of the camshaft should be flush with the back edge of the rear cam bearing. The point here is don’t trust the machine shop to correctly install the rear cam bearing in your 265. Have the machine shop leave the cam plug out so you can check the rear cam bearing position yourself.









After you are sure the rear cam bearing is installed correctly it’s time to install the rear cam plug. Do not use a 2 inch freeze plug! The 265 uses a rear cam plug which is slightly smaller in diameter than the cam plug used in a 1958 and up engines. 265 V8’s use a 2 1/64 inch shallow cam plug, while 1958 and up engines use a 2 3/32 inch cam plug. There is a machined step in the newer engines that prevent driving the plug to deep. There is no step machined into the block on a 55-57 engine, so care must be taken not to drive the plug to deep. The 1956 Shop Manual says the cam plug should be “installed flush to 1/32” deep to maintain a level surface on the rear of the cylinder block”. Here is my original cam plug and the correct replacement.


http://www.567chevyclub.com/images/56_Chevy/cam-b e...

Steve
1967 Camaro
1956 Bel Air


 
Farm boy 
Contributor
Posts: 451
Farm boy
Loc: Central California
Reg: 11-03-07
05-31-10 09:55 AM - Post#1923205    
    In response to 4dr 57

All small block Chevy engines were produced with an annular groove under the rear cam bearing regardless of what year they are. This groove supplies oil to the two lifter galleries. The difference in the 55-56 engines is in how the oil is supplied to the groove. On 1955 and 1956 265’s full oil pressure from the main oil galley passed through a drilled passage to feed a small hole in the rear cam bearing. As the camshaft rotated the machined slot in the rear cam journal would uncover the hole allowing oil to flow (via the machined slot) out a second hole in the cam bearing that was located over the annular groove. This setup supplied "pulsed" oil to the annular groove which supplies reduced pressure to the lifter galleries.

Starting in 1957 the drilled passage from the main oil gallery was redesigned to connect directly to the annular groove. With this change the annular groove and the lifter galleries have full oil pressure. The rear cam bearing on 57 and up engines only needs one oil hole to lubricate the rear cam journal from high pressure oil in the annular groove, and there is no longer a need for the machined slot on the rear cam journal.

A popular modification on 55-56 265 blocks is to grind an oil passage in the block connecting the drilled oil feed passage to the annular groove. This way the 265’s will oil just like the other SBC’s, and there is no longer a need to use a camshaft with a machined slot. If you do this modification you should use a 1957 and up "window" distributor because the higher oil pressure in the lifter galleries may be too much for the 1955-56 distributor which may cause it to leak oil.

Here is a 265 and a newer 327 with the rear cam bearings removed. Note the different location of the drilled oil supply passage from the main oil gallery on these two engines.







Steve
1967 Camaro
1956 Bel Air


 
Farm boy 
Contributor
Posts: 451
Farm boy
Loc: Central California
Reg: 11-03-07
05-31-10 09:58 AM - Post#1923206    
    In response to 4dr 57

If you convert the 265 to full pressure oiling you may have problems with your 55-56 distributor filling with oil. The lower bushing on these early distributors was fed low pressure "pulsed" oil from the RH lifter gallery. After the oil lubricates the lower distributor bushing it drains out via a hole above the bushing and then spills down the flat on the side of the distributor housing. That is what the "flat" on a 55-56 distributor is for, to let the oil from the distributor drain out. If you convert to full pressure oiling you could overcome the capacity of the drain hole, sending oil up the shaft, past the upper bushing, into the top of the distributor where it will cause all kinds of problems. A worn lower distributor bushing, combined with a high pressure-high volume oil pump, will make the problem worse. In 1957 Chevrolet redesigned the distributor to splash oiling from the drive gear so oil pressure in the lifter galley won’t have any affect on the distributor.


1957 and up distributors will work just fine in any 265. Even an HEI distributor will work in both stock and modified 265’s. If you are going to use the early 265 distributor you should not modify the block for full pressure oiling.







Steve
1967 Camaro
1956 Bel Air


 
beejay 
Deceased Member
Posts: 12605
beejay
Age: 84
Loc: Pflugerville, Texas
Reg: 06-01-04
05-31-10 10:52 AM - Post#1923233    
    In response to Farm boy

Steve, ya know, IF I remember rightly, you posted the same type answer about 2-3 years ago, and it corrected the problem. I'm sure I remember the pics, because they were so informative, along with the dialogue. Partner, ya du gud wurk!!!! I hope it solves the problem once again!!

Bruce

'56 4-door BelAir, 350, Holley 600, Eddie intake, TKO 600, CPP P/S and A arms, Sierra Gold & Adobe Beige
2010 VW Jetta S/W, 2.5, 5-cyl,6-spd auto.
'87 Elkie, 350 with 700r4 tranny B&M floor shift
http://www.picturetrail.com/beejay3/"


 
Old_Longboarder 
Deceased Member RIP Art
Posts: 12969
Old_Longboarder
Loc: GOD's Garage
Reg: 03-28-02
05-31-10 02:29 PM - Post#1923310    
    In response to beejay

265 lifters are also different from the later small blocks. The oil feed hole in them, is in a different place.

Home.., is where dog hair sticks to everything but the dog.





 
Farm boy 
Contributor
Posts: 451
Farm boy
Loc: Central California
Reg: 11-03-07
05-31-10 03:54 PM - Post#1923331    
    In response to beejay

  • beejay Said:
Steve, ya know, IF I remember rightly, you posted the same type answer about 2-3 years ago, and it corrected the problem. I'm sure I remember the pics, because they were so informative, along with the dialogue. Partner, ya du gud wurk!!!! I hope it solves the problem once again!!


I cut and pasted some stuff I had written a while back because I was in a hurry this morning. I hope Stanley’s problem with his 265 isn’t a rear cam bearing installed incorrectly, but it certainly could be. Guys that work in machine shops that don’t know any better will drive the rear cam bearing in until the holes in the bearing line up with the holes in the block and call it good. Some times this works out and some times it doesn’t. Check out this picture.



You can see the witness mark (dark band) on the cam bearing made by the slot in the camshaft as it went around. This cam bearing was installed to far towards the rear of the block and the rear cam bearing oil hole was almost completely out of the path of the oil slot on the camshaft. This engine most certainly had reduced oil flow to the lifters and if the cam bearing had been installed just a little bit deeper there would have been no oil to the lifters at all.



Steve
1967 Camaro
1956 Bel Air


 
4dr 57 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 4735

Loc: Texas Hill Country
Reg: 11-10-04
06-01-10 06:00 PM - Post#1923915    
    In response to Farm boy



OLB -I didn't know that either, despite having disassemled a couple sets in my youth.
As for the problem, there are too many unknowns. His shop receipt for the cam says 283 and it has been in the engine for 15,000 miles according to the owner. He described the problem as there being an increase in noise/lifter clack over a relitively short time. We ordered a stock oil pump.

Farmboy -I totally agree with beejay. Your love for these old mills is greatly appreciated
We might get a look at a few things mentioned in your reply if the problem turns out to be blockage. It's a nice looking 4dr wagon.

The pump won't be in for a week so this post will be buried by the time it's fixed. I'll try to post and let you know how it all worked out. Or maybe the owner will be signed on by then and he can do it himself Either way, Thanks You Guys
Stanley






It's all good. Mostly


 
Dave Ellsworth 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 1

Loc: Saint John,NB, Canada
Reg: 04-07-14
04-08-14 05:58 AM - Post#2442891    
    In response to Farm boy

Hi,
I’m new to the forum as of today.
I had my 265 converted to full oil pressure and did not know about the distributor oil problems.
Could I groove out or make a small cut in the bottom of the shaft to allow excess oil to drain from front to rear?
Thanks,
Dave





 
Powerglide56 
Poster
Posts: 69

Age: 54
Loc: SE Florida
Reg: 01-07-10
04-08-14 03:40 PM - Post#2443030    
    In response to Dave Ellsworth

Nope. 265 lifters are NOT unique. Only the way they're oiled is different than 283 and later motors.



Edited by Powerglide56 on 04-08-14 03:42 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
rafaelmd 
Newbie
Posts: 1

Reg: 11-21-20
11-21-20 02:31 PM - Post#2808276    
    In response to Farm boy

Hi there.
What can you tell about the oem rear oil galley plugs of the 265 engine. The plugs heads look flat and don't seem to be threaded. Is it pressed? I'm.buildimg a 265 in Brazil. thanks!



 


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