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 Page 1 of 2 12
Username Post: Thermostat temp.        (Topic#365725)
sting199 
Poster
Posts: 59

Reg: 12-12-19
07-05-21 08:56 AM - Post#2822653    

What would be the best thermostat temp on a medium rebuild Chevy 350 in a 79 Corvette? The owners manual calls for a 195 degree, but I also realize in 79 they were playing with a lot of emission settings and valves to drop emissions. Thanks!



 


65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-05-21 09:19 AM - Post#2822656    
    In response to sting199

180*



 
IgnitionMan 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3907

Reg: 04-15-05
07-05-21 11:14 AM - Post#2822660    
    In response to sting199

Depends on what is still there, and what isn't. Rule of thumb:

Cast iron block and heads, 180 deg/F.

Cast iron block, aluminum heads, 195 deg/F. even with no emissions.

Goes to the ability of the heads to bleed off combustion chamber temperatures for operating temperature efficiency.



 
sting199 
Poster
Posts: 59

Reg: 12-12-19
07-06-21 09:59 AM - Post#2822733    
    In response to IgnitionMan

Thanks for the help. Got cast iron heads and block and was leaning to 180-185 range.



 
elcamino 
Dedicated Member
Posts: 5515
elcamino
Loc: Lake Superior-Michigan US...
Reg: 03-30-00
07-07-21 12:54 AM - Post#2822772    
    In response to sting199

The ins and outs of Thermostat selection: How to Choose a Thermostat for your Classic Car

Mike
2021 GMC Sierra Denali CC 6.2L / 10-sp
2018 Polaris RZR S 900 EPS
2017 John Deere X738 Snow Blower


 
bobb 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 5899

Loc: paradise
Reg: 09-05-03
07-10-21 09:04 AM - Post#2822997    
    In response to sting199

i like 160. i also like oem stats. i went through 3 junk ones on my work truck. i also like to drill a hole in it to vent air.

70 L camino, grampa engine, g-force 5 spd, road rage suspension. Pray first before all else fails.


 
1983G20Van 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 3894

Loc: Bedford, Texas, USA
Reg: 11-13-02
07-10-21 09:20 PM - Post#2823018    
    In response to bobb

Personally I run 170F on everything. Hot enough to burn off the moisture yet cool enough to help prevent detonation. Even aluminum head engines run best way cooler than 200°F. The aluminum V6 in my 2007 Infiniti G35 came factory with a 170°F thermostat. I ran a 144°F Nismo thermostat in my 2011 Infiniti M56S with the fans on at 149°F and 100% fans at 154°F and it loved it. I run a 170°F stat in my aluminum head 383 Vortec in my 97 Express van. Low speed fans on at 175°F and high speed on at 178°F. On my 2003 4.7 Dakota and my 2006 5.7 Ram, both aluminum heads, both ran better with a 170°F thermostat. Better response, more power and better fuel mileage.

1983 G20 Van, 350 TPI, Ported 906 Vortecs, Edelbrock 3817 Base, ASM oversize runners. Reed Custom Roller cam, 700r4, 12 bolt with 3.08 gears, Doug Thorley Tri-Y headers, true duals


Edited by 1983G20Van on 07-10-21 09:29 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
grumpyvette 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator -- Performance Subject Matter Expert --
Posts: 17663
grumpyvette
Age: 73
Loc: FLORIDA USA
Reg: 03-16-01
07-11-21 05:56 AM - Post#2823041    
    In response to 1983G20Van

http://www.grumpysperformance.com/img212.gif
theres several reasons you want a 190f-200f t-stat
passing emissions , low engine wear and better fuel economy

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!


 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15355

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
07-11-21 06:58 AM - Post#2823049    
    In response to grumpyvette

People get into the trap of thinking putting in a lower temp thermostat is better because it makes the engine run cooler. It does not. It depends on the components that make up your entire cooling system. If your system is only capable of cooling the car to 200 degrees, that is the temp your car will run. Doesn’t matter if the thermostat opens at 100 degrees or 180 degrees. As Grumpy put up, you get better combustion, emissions, etc. with a higher temp thermostat. Most manufacturers are up around 200 degrees for their stock thermostats.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
1983G20Van 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 3894

Loc: Bedford, Texas, USA
Reg: 11-13-02
07-11-21 07:37 AM - Post#2823053    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
People get into the trap of thinking putting in a lower temp thermostat is better because it makes the engine run cooler. It does not. It depends on the components that make up your entire cooling system. If your system is only capable of cooling the car to 200 degrees, that is the temp your car will run. Doesn’t matter if the thermostat opens at 100 degrees or 180 degrees. As Grumpy put up, you get better combustion, emissions, etc. with a higher temp thermostat. Most manufacturers are up around 200 degrees for their stock thermostats.



Most manufactures pull timing starting around 180°F because they would otherwise run into detonation. Bore wear is almost non existant over 170°F. A 170°F stat with a good cooling system will run around 180°F. My Express van has run 178-182°F for tens of thousands of miles. Because it is under the temp the PCM starts pulling timing and the air charge stays cooler it makes more power and gets better mpg. 200° rating is for emissions not power. I pulled the heads off my old 350 when I put the 383 in. The 350s bores are perfect.

1983 G20 Van, 350 TPI, Ported 906 Vortecs, Edelbrock 3817 Base, ASM oversize runners. Reed Custom Roller cam, 700r4, 12 bolt with 3.08 gears, Doug Thorley Tri-Y headers, true duals


Edited by 1983G20Van on 07-11-21 07:38 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
pauldian 
Contributor
Posts: 414
pauldian
Loc: seligman,arizona
Reg: 05-14-09
07-11-21 12:18 PM - Post#2823067    
    In response to bobb

  • bobb Said:
i like 160. i also like oem stats. i went through 3 junk ones on my work truck. i also like to drill a hole in it to vent air.





Remember,I'm not always right. But I'M never WRONG !


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-11-21 06:29 PM - Post#2823092    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
People get into the trap of thinking putting in a lower temp thermostat is better because it makes the engine run cooler. It does not.




That is completely false. EVERY car I've had runs just above the thermostat temperature, because the thermostat temperature is when it just begins to open and it has to get a little above to open enough to get the flow to cool. The only time one ran higher was because it had to get hotter before the electric cooling fans turned on. Every car has run only a few degrees above the thermostat temperature on the highway.

This falsehood probably started because the thermostat is not a switch that is open or closed. It opens over a temperature range of 10* to 20*. So, when the most cooling is needed and the thermostat has to be fully open then the engine temperature must be 10* to 20* over the thermostat rating.




 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15355

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
07-13-21 06:46 PM - Post#2823182    
    In response to 65_Impala

But if your cooling system is not capable of cooling to the temperature just above the thermostat temp the temperature will rise until it reaches the temp the cooling system can achieve. Sounds like your cooling system was capable of sustaining the temperature around the temperature thermostat was rated to open. If your cooling system is capable of sustaining say 185 degrees, the car will run at around 185 whether you have a 150 thermostat or a 180 thermostat. If you put in a 200 degree thermostat, the temp will reach 200 or a little more and the cooling system will actually cool the engine enough to make the thermostat start to close and then the temp will start to rise again.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
grumpyvette 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator -- Performance Subject Matter Expert --
Posts: 17663
grumpyvette
Age: 73
Loc: FLORIDA USA
Reg: 03-16-01
07-14-21 04:09 AM - Post#2823195    
    In response to wagonman100

wagonman100 is correct

http://www.grumpysperformance.com/radcool1.jpg

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?thr...

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?thr...

http://garage.grumpysperformance.com/index.php?thr...

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-14-21 07:32 AM - Post#2823204    
    In response to wagonman100

Sure, but then you would have a pretty shitty cooling system.

Sorry, but the explanation commonly given that the thermostat is only for engine warm-up and then it opens and does nothing is complete BS.

Thermostats aren't open or closed switches either. The amount open varies with temperature. Closed below their rated temperature and then they go from open to closed in the next 10-20*F of temperature.

One of the things that affects the cooling system capability is the temperature differential between the coolant and the air flowing through the radiator. If the car is running with no other changes to the system, then the coolant to ambient air differential is the only factor that can affect how well the system can cool. No other changes means airflow, coolant flow, heat engine is generating, etc are all remaining constant.

If the cooling system has enough cooling capacity, then the amount the thermostat is open changes to regulate the coolant temperature within the thermostat operating range. If you have a 150*F thermostat them the engine will run in the range of 150* to 170*F, but should be closer to the 150*F side.

If the cooling system is marginal, then the coolant temperature will follow the ambient air temperature. If your example 150*F thermostat but running at 185*F happened on a day when the air was 80*F, then when the air rose to 100*F the coolant temperature would also rise to 205*F. Better not try to take a road trip through the desert in 120*F plus air with a marginal cooling system like this unless your engine likes running at 225*F plus...





 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15355

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
07-15-21 09:06 AM - Post#2823258    
    In response to 65_Impala

Most people don’t drive in 120F. temperatures. And coolant temperature does not follow ambient temperature exactly degree for degree. As long as your cooling system can dissipate the heat to somewhere, it will still run at the temperature it is capable of maintaining and maybe a few degrees hotter on an extremely hot day. More cars used to overheat on hot days while stuck in traffic because they did not pull as much air through the radiator as they do today being that the radiators were not sealed to direct all of the air over them the way they are today and electric fans draw more air than a mechanical fan at idle speed. Plus when the car is not moving, there is no airflow through the engine compartment to let the heat go somewhere. It all stays bottled up under the hood. The electric fans are better at pushing some of that hot air out from under the hood too since they run faster. And that is all with aluminum radiators that aren’t as efficient at heat dissipation as the old copper/brass radiators are.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-15-21 09:09 AM - Post#2823259    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
Most people don’t drive in 120F. temperatures. And coolant temperature does not follow ambient temperature exactly degree for degree. As long as your cooling system can dissipate the heat to somewhere, it will still run at the temperature it is capable of maintaining and maybe a few degrees hotter on an extremely hot day. More cars used to overheat on hot days while stuck in traffic because they did not pull as much air through the radiator as they do today being that the radiators were not sealed to direct all of the air over them the way they are today and electric fans draw more air than a mechanical fan at idle speed. Plus when the car is not moving, there is no airflow through the engine compartment to let the heat go somewhere. It all stays bottled up under the hood. The electric fans are better at pushing some of that hot air out from under the hood too since they run faster. And that is all with aluminum radiators that aren’t as efficient at heat dissipation as the old copper/brass radiators are.




Right now, I could care less about whatever theory you think is right because you just completely contradicted yourself.

If the coolant system "achieved" a temperature then cars wouldn't overheat on hot days.

The reason the temperature goes up a few degrees on really hot days is to open the thermostat a bit more.



 
japete92 
"7th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1777
japete92
Loc: No. Virginia
Reg: 01-18-13
07-15-21 03:23 PM - Post#2823268    
    In response to grumpyvette

  • grumpyvette Said:



100% correct.

Pete



 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-15-21 06:23 PM - Post#2823273    
    In response to japete92

  • Quote:
the t-stats only major function or purpose, is to restrict flow UNTIL the coolant reaches and or exceeds a designed in temperature range, at which point it opens and remains open unless the coolant temps fall below that designed temp. limit.



The above is either really poorly written or it is purposely written to say the thermostat opens once the rated temperature is reached. Either way, the first possibility is very easy to be interpreted wrong and the second possibility is simply 100% wrong.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermostat#Autom otiv...

"Once the operating temperature is reached, the thermostat progressively increases or decreases its opening in response to temperature changes, dynamically balancing the coolant recirculation flow and coolant flow to the radiator to maintain the engine temperature in the optimum range."


The thermostat is not there to just restrict flow until the operating temperature is reached and then it opens and remains open. It constantly varies the amount it is open to control the engine temperature.




 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15355

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
07-15-21 07:41 PM - Post#2823281    
    In response to 65_Impala

I did not contradict myself. I said the cooling system will maintain the temperature it is capable of maintaining. Maintaining that temperature depends on a few factors. One of them being that the system has to be able to dissipate the heat the engine produces. A hotter day does make it a bit harder to dissipate that heat, therefore the engine may run a little bit hotter than it would on a cooler day, but the rise in operating temperature will not necessarily match the rise in ambient temperature degree for degree.
There are several different factors that dictate whether or not the cooling system can dissipate the heat. Coolant capacity in the form of the size of the radiator (the more coolant that can be in the radiator tubes and give off heat, the more efficient the system will be), air flow over the radiator (either by driving and forcing air through the radiator or the fan(s) pushing or pulling air), and being able to scavenge the heat out from the car. So a car stuck in traffic sitting in one spot may tend to run hotter or even overheat due to little to no airflow over the radiator (especially with a mechanical fan with no shroud), no hot air being scavenged and sitting on a hot road surrounded by other cars putting off heat because all of those things interfere with the cars cooling systems ability to dissipate the heat the engine is making.

The thermostats main job is to help the engine reach operating temperature faster by not letting coolant flow, therefore heating the coolant sitting in the block that can’t get to the radiator. Then once the thermostat opens it does vary the opening size with the varying temperature. But the varying opening doesn’t control the temperature, per se, the temperature makes the thermostat vary the opening. Part of the thermostats job too is to give a restriction to the system so the coolant can remain in the radiator long enough to dissipate the heat, that is one way the thermostat helps “control” temperature, but again, if the cooling system is not capable of dissipating enough heat, it will not maintain a temperature close to the thermostat temp. If the cooling system can’t get the coolant temp back down to the thermostat rated temp, the thermostat will remain open and will not be able to control the temp. The capability of the cooling system is what controls the temperature.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-16-21 03:44 AM - Post#2823302    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
But the varying opening doesn’t control the temperature, per se, the temperature makes the thermostat vary the opening.



When the coolant temperature rises a bit, the thermostat will open a little more to allow more coolant flow so the coolant can be cooled more. That's a textbook definition of what a thermostat does.


  • wagonman100 Said:
Part of the thermostats job too is to give a restriction to the system so the coolant can remain in the radiator long enough to dissipate the heat




Wrong.

Try to find one single person who works professionally in the field which will back this claim. You never will.

If less flow through the radiator cooled the engine better, then the thermostat would work by closing when the engine got hotter to slow down the coolant so it could have more time to cool. There is a reason why the thermostat is fully open when the coolant is the hottest and it's certainly not because the coolant needs to go through the radiator slower so it can dissipate more heat.

This old wives tale started mostly due to Ford flat heads that needed a restriction for the engine side of the cooling system to work.




 
IgnitionMan 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3907

Reg: 04-15-05
07-16-21 08:50 AM - Post#2823316    
    In response to wagonman100

Everybody else, recommendation, please, stay out of this one, it will only make things worse, and not clarify the situation to a reasonable end point.



 
1983G20Van 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 3894

Loc: Bedford, Texas, USA
Reg: 11-13-02
07-16-21 01:31 PM - Post#2823326    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
I did not contradict myself. I said the cooling system will maintain the temperature it is capable of maintaining. Maintaining that temperature depends on a few factors. One of them being that the system has to be able to dissipate the heat the engine produces. A hotter day does make it a bit harder to dissipate that heat, therefore the engine may run a little bit hotter than it would on a cooler day, but the rise in operating temperature will not necessarily match the rise in ambient temperature degree for degree.
There are several different factors that dictate whether or not the cooling system can dissipate the heat. Coolant capacity in the form of the size of the radiator (the more coolant that can be in the radiator tubes and give off heat, the more efficient the system will be), air flow over the radiator (either by driving and forcing air through the radiator or the fan(s) pushing or pulling air), and being able to scavenge the heat out from the car. So a car stuck in traffic sitting in one spot may tend to run hotter or even overheat due to little to no airflow over the radiator (especially with a mechanical fan with no shroud), no hot air being scavenged and sitting on a hot road surrounded by other cars putting off heat because all of those things interfere with the cars cooling systems ability to dissipate the heat the engine is making.

The thermostats main job is to help the engine reach operating temperature faster by not letting coolant flow, therefore heating the coolant sitting in the block that can’t get to the radiator. Then once the thermostat opens it does vary the opening size with the varying temperature. But the varying opening doesn’t control the temperature, per se, the temperature makes the thermostat vary the opening. Part of the thermostats job too is to give a restriction to the system so the coolant can remain in the radiator long enough to dissipate the heat, that is one way the thermostat helps “control” temperature, but again, if the cooling system is not capable of dissipating enough heat, it will not maintain a temperature close to the thermostat temp. If the cooling system can’t get the coolant temp back down to the thermostat rated temp, the thermostat will remain open and will not be able to control the temp. The capability of the cooling system is what controls the temperature.



Coolant having to sit in the radiator to dissapate heat is a myth! The more circulation you have without cavitation the cooler your engine will run.


1983 G20 Van, 350 TPI, Ported 906 Vortecs, Edelbrock 3817 Base, ASM oversize runners. Reed Custom Roller cam, 700r4, 12 bolt with 3.08 gears, Doug Thorley Tri-Y headers, true duals


 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15355

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
07-16-21 06:40 PM - Post#2823344    
    In response to 1983G20Van

I didn’t say sit in the radiator. The coolant only sits in the radiator while the thermostat is closed. I said stays in long enough to dissipate heat. The thermostat restriction is also there to prevent cavitation. The cooling system is a balancing act between coolant flow and heat dissipation.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-16-21 07:11 PM - Post#2823345    
    In response to wagonman100

Still not true. Claims that too much flow through the radiator causes overheating are ridiculous. These claims are saying that increasing the flow rate to cool more as the thermostat opens is good, but going above the flow rate the thermostat opening allows is bad.

Following that theory, putting a performance thermostat with a larger opening than stock would cause overheating.

https://blog.championcooling.com/2017/10/06/high-f...

“Generally speaking, higher flow and higher pressure is beneficial to the cooling system"

"The idea that too much water flow causes overheating is a myth."


Why do you think NASCAR teams were running 80-100psi in their coolant systems? It certainly wasn't so they could flow the coolant slower to get the engine to cool better.

NASCAR then mandated a 33psi pop-off valve to cut the cooling capability which in turn reduced the ability of the cars to drive in tandem at the superspeedways.





 
japete92 
"7th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1777
japete92
Loc: No. Virginia
Reg: 01-18-13
07-17-21 05:32 AM - Post#2823365    
    In response to 65_Impala

Fundamentally flawed logic, physics, and facts. Too many examples to take the time to address.

The post by Grumpyvette, with his linked data, IS correct. Recommend folks following this topic rely on that data.

I won't be following this topic any longer.

Pete



 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-17-21 07:44 AM - Post#2823369    
    In response to japete92

  • japete92 Said:
Fundamentally flawed logic, physics, and facts. Too many examples to take the time to address.

The post by Grumpyvette, with his linked data, IS correct. Recommend folks following this topic rely on that data.

I won't be following this topic any longer.

Pete



Good. Don't know what you think is incorrect because you have posted claims multiple times that both Grumpys links and Wagonmans slow the coolant down claims are correct yet this quote is directly from Grumpys links.

"some of my least favorite myths
(1) you need to slow the coolant flow thru the radiator to allow time to cool the fluid moving thru it"

It's rather pathetic that Grumpy also made this both sided claim too. Maybe you're just blindly following his lead? You certainly didn't read the links before posting.

The insistence that "slower coolant flow through the radiator cools more" comes from people who simply don't understand the physics of heat transfer. Sure, slow flow through a heat exchanger would cool the liquid at the exit more. Too bad that in a closed loop system slow flow doesn't move as much heat energy. The same physics work in every closed loop system A boiler system increases the flow when more heat is required.

Then, these same people also completely ignore what happens to the coolant in the engine when their "slow flow" theory also forces the coolant to stay in the engine longer.





 
IgnitionMan 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 3907

Reg: 04-15-05
07-17-21 12:03 PM - Post#2823373    
    In response to japete92

I'd let it go, folks, trying to have a battle of wits with a completely unarmed person is useless, and you guys don't need it.

Let it go.



 
wagonman100 
Site Ambassador
Posts: 15355

Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
07-17-21 12:10 PM - Post#2823374    
    In response to 65_Impala

I never said the coolant flowing too fast through the radiator would cause overheating. Too much flow may cause hot spots and cavitation, and that would not be good for engine longevity or performance. There are so many factors that affect cooling efficiency. You can run the fluid through as fast as you want, provided there is no cavitation, but if the radiator isn’t big enough to dissipate enough heat to cool the fluid before it re-enters the engine the coolant will build heat and eventually the engine will overheat.

Jay
Friends don’t let friends drive Fords.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon
1957 Cameo Carrier


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 4816

Reg: 12-29-02
07-17-21 05:38 PM - Post#2823389    
    In response to wagonman100

  • wagonman100 Said:
Part of the thermostats job too is to give a restriction to the system so the coolant can remain in the radiator long enough to dissipate the heat



You just accidentally wrote this??? Because the opposite of remaining in the radiator long enough to dissipate the heat is not remaining in the radiator long enough, which would be flowing through the radiator too fast to dissipate the heat.

You do know cavitation would only happen on the inlet side of the pump? It doesn't change the flow very much, but it's damaging to the pump impeller.

And yes, I'm pretty sure everyone understands that a radiator that is too small just can't cool the engine no matter what you do to try and make it work. Maybe at certain times it would work if it was only a little too small, but it would not reliably work all the time.

But, if your car was overheating and you fixed an unwanted flow restriction, you just might find that having the extra coolant flow fixes your overheating problem. The complete opposite of what the above quote claims.



 


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