Gain extra benefits by becoming a Supporting Member Click here find out how!
Silver
Gold ***Platinum***
Carl1962 (2)briski1971 dfwwingnut CowboyTrukr (3)sz0k30 (6)
Suburbazine (2)Gunk(7)markl350 (6)roseyintxCutlass442 (10)Rager
Chevyfan60 (10)JohnE (12)cnbell (11)Todd M (11)savina64
LRH (3)61ohboy66conv55_FEVER george88gta (10)BillOrton39
68 Bel-AirNitroholic (10)
warpwr (8)Lynn63 (5)
Jim.Biron (7)
1956chevy (2)
BMF-1955
Classic Performance Products
Ciadella Interiors American Auto Wire Art Morrison.com
Hellwig Products Inc Performance Rod & Custom
Exile® Battery Keeper™ 6/12 volt charger w/ LED battery monitor
Impala Bob's Bob's Chevy Trucks Bob's Chevelle Parts Bob's Classic Chevy

  >> Switch to Mobile Version <<

Recent Hot Topics
Current Quote
"I just want to say thanks to all of the contributors on this forum. There is a wealth of knowledge here and a super willingness to share. I can't get better and faster answers here than on ANY other board and I do frequent a lot of forums. THANKS AGAIN!!"
~ Member
Recent Topics
WIN / WIN

Use this to search for parts on Ebay
A portion of your purchase will come back to the site.
 Page 1 of 2 12
Username Post: 216 Engine        (Topic#5159)
Anonymous 

08-05-02 07:49 AM - Post#37423    

Is it possible to fit insert bearings where the babbitt bearings are on the crankshaft?
what is the best way to approach freeing the pistons that have been sitting for 40 years.

------------------


 
This Forum is Sponsored by

bobsclassicchevy.com
Robert_May 
Old as Dirt Member
Posts: 6939

Loc: San Marcos, CA USA
Reg: 01-03-02
Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 08:50 AM - Post#37424    
    In response to

I haven't heard of any insert bearing replacements for the babbit bearings. If you don't find any, might as well let the engine go as it may need sleeving anyway and that's not going to be cheap. Probably better to pick up a newer 235 or 216 that does use insert bearings and has full oil pressure to the rod bearings rather than the dippers that that engine has.
Robert May Fat? Eat less and you will get thinner!


 
Royer 
Needs to Get Out More Member
Posts: 11411

Loc: Bloomfield Hills, Michiga...
Reg: 09-25-01
Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 10:01 AM - Post#37426    
    In response to

I recall seeing an ad (a number of ads over a period of time, actually) in Hemmings Motor News for an outfit that specialized in rifle-drilling Chevy 216 cranks so as to convert the engines to a full-pressure system. I also seem to remember that they had developed some modern insert bearings for replacement of the earlier babbitted mains - which would be used, of course, with later insert bearing rods as well. Trouble is, I can't - at this time anyway - recall the firms' name or location. It might be worth your while to pick up an issue of HMN. Look through the pre-'55 Chevy section as well as the "Services Offerred" section and see what you can find.

Unless you really want to keep a known original block though, I'd be tempted to simply go with a '55 -'62 235 inch engine myself.

As to getting the pistons loose, I'd try removing the plugs and pouring a good amount of automatic trans fluid (I like Dexron the best as it really tends to get into those cracks, but I know it is a bit expensive). Let it sit and soak for a while. Use a crow bar or similar type tool and try to pry against the ring gear teeth to get the engine to turn over. DON'T use a breaker bar on the bolt that holds the front pulley on. You can break it - and that just causes more problems.

E-mail me directly for other tricks with a grease gun if the above doesn't work.

Royer



 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 12:41 PM - Post#37427    
    In response to Royer

I believe Kanter sells prepped rods on an exchange basis, but I think you have to have the block machined??

Jason

 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 12:51 PM - Post#37428    
    In response to

The 216 was not made with inserted rod bearings and/or full oil pressure. All 216s had babbit rods and oil pan/rod dippers. As mentioned, the very best thing to do is to locate a later 235 (or better yet, a 261 truck engine). The last 216 was in 52, which had switched to side mounts, BUUUUUUUUUUT, some 52 cars still had the provision for the front mounts in the cross member. Therefore, if you have a 52-earlier car with provision for front mounts (which were used up to 51), then you can use the 51-earlier front engine plate on a 52-62 engine and bolt it in with 51-earlier front motor mounts. then, at the rear, simply bolt up whatever tranny/bell housing is now on your car.
For example, if you have a 51 car which has a 6volt system, and you locate a 55-62 engine which was 12volt, then simply use the 6volt components (starter, generator, dist, coil, etc) from the 51 car and the 51 bell housing, front/rear mounts, and irt will all bolt together without any modifications.

------------------
Tom Parsons

[This message has been edited by DZAUTO (edited 08-05-2002).]

 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 01:35 PM - Post#37429    
    In response to

Back in the late 50's early 60's it was quite common at rebuild time to switch from babbited rods to insert bearing rods. I don't know if this is available anymore, but the 216 I just rebuilt has them. The insert bearing rods are large journal and still have the trough-dipper system. As far as freeing up the pistons-rods-crankshaft, try Marvel Mystery Oil or Brake cleaner liberally and let soak then flush with Mystery oil. Good luck.

 
2blu52 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 14108

Age: 80
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 04:11 PM - Post#37430    
    In response to

My 52 216 has insert rod bearings, the machine work was done locally but I see some ads in Hemmings and VCCA's own Generator and Distributor magazine. The inserts just replace the babbit, there is no change in the oiling system.
"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
metalman 
Senior Member
Posts: 856

Loc: michigan
Reg: 05-05-02
Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 05:22 PM - Post#37431    
    In response to 2blu52

I have worked on numerous 216s that supposedly were original that had been converted to bearings.It isn't that expensive if you choose to do so.They also can convert to a full oiling system.One company is in California.May be someone out there knows the name,off-hand it escapes.me.The service used to advertise in OLD CAR WEEKLY at on time.
Home of old guys repair shop.........


 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 05:36 PM - Post#37432    
    In response to metalman

And you all are correct, babbit rod engines can be CONVERTED to insert bearing type rods. I didn't mean to be misleading, I was only expressing that ALL 216s ONLY came from the factory with babbit rods.
AND, unless it is absolutely imperative to retain an original engine, it is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO much better to install a later (54-62), full oil pressure type engine.

------------------
Tom Parsons

 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-05-02 09:59 PM - Post#37425    
    In response to Robert_May

I've seen engines freed up by pouring some brake fluid down the cylinder and letting it soak for a day. It must eat away at whatever is causing the ridge?


C

------------------
Chris & Diane's '50 Styleline
"Project Foodstamp"

 
Royer 
Needs to Get Out More Member
Posts: 11411

Loc: Bloomfield Hills, Michiga...
Reg: 09-25-01
Re: 216 Engine
08-06-02 02:08 AM - Post#37433    
    In response to

Just so there isn't any doubt, I'm in total agreement with you, DZauto, on the recommendation to go with a later, full-pressure lube engine. My understanding is that Chevy stuck with the old "scoop and dipper" lube system as long as they did because of the fact that it was so much cheaper to manufacture. The expense of the added operations - rifle drilling the crank - was the reason.

The increased road speeds after WW2 really made continuation of the old design impractical, though.

 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-06-02 08:48 AM - Post#37434    
    In response to Royer

It's the crankshaft.
It is the crankshaft that's important when rebuilding a 216 and deciding on babbit or inserts. The main and rod journals must be mic'ed to see how far gone the crank is. Then decide which you want to go either re-babbiting (Paul's Rod & Babbit 816-587-4747 Parkville,MO.)or inserts put into your rods. The cost is about the same, but I feel the babbit is gentler on the crank; the inserts are easier to change when worn.

If the crank is gone, then its time for a new motor

The dipper/splash was an excellent system but very expensive for Chevy to produce. Most guys dont know how to set up an oil pan and dipper gauge anymore; but its easy with the tools. The birth of Hydraulic lifters in the 53 Powerglide equipted models spelled the end of the old system as GMC truck had experience in tooling for the full pressure systems and the Chevy V-8 was emerging from the Rocket V-8.

There is absolutely nothing any more wrong with a stock 216 with babbit or inserts that will be solved by a later 235 with pressure to the rods. If you find a later 235 it will likely need a rebuild and new inserts!. Once you got a 235 then you can chase its weak points away by putting in a 265 V-8, then chase its weakness away all the way up to a 350 crate motor, chase its problems way with a new car, etc.

Point is for most folks with a stock car a simple rod babbiting or inserts on their stock 216 is all they really need. If your not staying stock, then cut to the chase and a V-8 is the way to go.

PS: on freeing up your stuck pistons. Well 40 years of sticking usually means your rings are welded into the piston grooves, valves and lifters may be stuck, and the cylinder walls are rust scarred. Sad to say but its a 50/50 chance for a rebuild.

[This message has been edited by mr. slugo (edited 08-06-2002).]

 
2blu52 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 14108

Age: 80
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
Re: 216 Engine
08-06-02 01:48 PM - Post#37437    
    In response to

I would like to correct one statement, hydraulic lifters were available prior to 53, in the 235's that powered the early Powerglides.
"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-06-02 09:35 PM - Post#37435    
    In response to

I can not thank all of you enought for the help and advice that I have been given.
The engine is still in the car because of the very damp climate we have in Ireland I will continue to apply penitrating oil every day as I have beening doing, 10 days of doing this I have set myself.
Then I need to soak the pistons and attempt to free them,I will be happy with the smallest degree of movement.
Then remove the engine and do a complete examination of it.( at that stage I will be back to this form).
I am not in a rush slowly doing it,ensuring as little damage as possible.
My first choice is to rebuild the engine,This car is one of a kind assembled in Ireland.Costs do come into it anything I need has to be shipped into this country from the US and this adds to the costs,already I have located a company that will babbitt the crankshaft.
Thanks again.

------------------


 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-06-02 09:48 PM - Post#37436    
    In response to

Lukeod,
What year is this car and do you have any pics?
Sounds like a very rare Chevy indeed! Please keep the forum posted on your progress.

Erin Go Bragh!!

 
Royer 
Needs to Get Out More Member
Posts: 11411

Loc: Bloomfield Hills, Michiga...
Reg: 09-25-01
Re: 216 Engine
08-07-02 01:38 AM - Post#37438    
    In response to 2blu52

mr. slugo, you seem to feel a bit more positive in your appraisal of the old 216 "scoop & dipper" system than I do, but I will concede that it was satisfactory in some types of service. My experience is that it was OK at lower rpm around town, when used in a farm truck, etc. What you didn't want to do was take one with the standard 4.11:1 rear axle and head ou onto the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Lukeod may well be fortunate in that my limited exposure to Ireland suggests that a re-built 216 may still be well-suited to motoring over there.

I would caution patience with efforts to free the engine up. Also, you may want to unbolt the rocker shaft from the head before trying to turn the engine. In case one or more valves are rusted to the guides in the closed (or near-closed) position, you don't want to bend pushrods or otherwise damage the valve train.

 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-07-02 07:29 AM - Post#37439    
    In response to Royer

2blu52; Your right about the earlier 1950-52 Powerglide hydraulic tappets. I should have been more specific about the 3 hole 1953 PG tappet and its oil galleries.

Royer, defending the little 216 and especially the 4 way (dipper/scoop) oiling is somewhat out of fashion. So many guys are yanking them out of old Chevies that you would think the engine was a "lemon". Far from it, I think it was one of the best engines made in the 20th Century. The dipper/scoop was not deficient at oiling until the motor reached an excess of about 4100rpm. Many race cars of the early to mid 1950's ran the system with great success. The problem occured after about 4100 rpm the scoops couldn't keep up. But until that point the dipper/splash was perfect in lubing the piston pin, cylinder walls, and rod and main bearings.

Where most people think the dipper/scoop was deficient came in the 1990's when articles in magazines touted "how to convert" to a full pressure system. Chevy in 1940's knew this "conversion" and did not do it for the simple reason that the rest of the drive train wasn't designed to handle road speeds that would equate to 4000+ engine rpms. The real "babbit pounding" that guys think is because of the oil system is more do to the lost art of "shimming" a rod bearing to take out the excess play. I agree that any Chevy that came stock with the 216 and a 4:11 differential wasn't designed for any prolonged hiway speeds; but the 235 full pressure engine with 4:11 won't take it either. The rod inserts will wallow, valve train can't keep up, and the overall wear will be just as extreem.

Maybe what I'm trying to say is that it doesn't matter if the engine is a 216 babbit, or insert, or 235 full pressure. The real problem is overall hiway speeds, low differential ratios, and smaller diameter tires all = 4000+rpms. For most guys keeping the stock 216, rebuilding it with alloy pistons, and driving mostly under 3500rpms will be just fine. For more torque and horsepower, yes the 235; but then again why not a V-8?

 
Royer 
Needs to Get Out More Member
Posts: 11411

Loc: Bloomfield Hills, Michiga...
Reg: 09-25-01
Re: 216 Engine
08-07-02 10:05 AM - Post#37440    
    In response to

I think you summed things up very well, mr.sluggo! By the time Chevy came out with the full-pressure 235, they had already gone to a 3.70:1 rear end (on the manual shifts) and this obviously helped the higher-speed cruising situation as well. I have a friend accross the street who has an original 1950 Chevy with a 216 that came out of Nebraska. The car has 60,000 original miles and is running fine after a valve grind (tappets were set a bit tight when he got it - likely responsible for the two burned exhaust valves).

I'm almost 58 now - and by the time I actually started working on cars in my early teens most of the 216s in service already had a number of miles on them. The 235s, in contrast, were then "newer technology." So, in fairness, I must admitt that in the majority of cases I was compariing experiences with tired 216s to experiences with newer and healthier 235s.

I still prefer the full pressure system, but I wouldn't trash a 216 if it was in condition to be re-built. As far as servicing the nozzles that aim oil at the scoops, I've found that the best hint was from an old-time mechanic friend. If you don't have the Chevy aiming tool - and I haven't seen one in years - this old mechanic showed me how to connect a hose and squirt water through the nozzles to check and see that it is aimed correctly as the scoop comes around.

Have you found any other techniques that were helpfull for doing this?

 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-07-02 11:32 AM - Post#37441    
    In response to Royer

Perhaps Mr Slugo could go into a little detail on shimming.
On the chevs of the 40s sit they have "tool used to align oil dipper troughts in pan" while they have it priced at $435-00 they will hire it to you for $35 with a deposit of $400.I hope they will include Ireland in this system.
From the little I know of this engine there is no point in assembling it without this tool.

------------------


 
Anonymous 

Re: 216 Engine
08-07-02 06:22 PM - Post#37442    
    In response to

Royer,
I think your statement that "comparing experiences with tired 216s to experiences with newer and healthier 235s" is very true. It's probably the reason why the 216 doesn't get the credit it deserves today cause most of the little 216 workhorses are very well worn and on the edge of 50+ years of service. Most guys just don't often see a fresh one!

The oil pan aligning tools are needed in both 216 and 235 engines up till around 53PG and 1954 Truck. The real "trick" is not to disturb the oil pan too much when removing pan from the car!! It's rugged, but dents from a misplaced jack will bump the troughs out of alignment. Treat the oil pan like it was made of glass. The oil troughs and the nozzles usually do not get out of alignment. So if the pan is in good shape, the existing parts will very likely be within spec.

The target tool "1949 Oil Pan Target Gauge J-969-1, or 1952 J-969-1A" is super hard to come by. It works by setting the tool on top the empty oil pan and then using a garden hose (with a on/off squirt tip) to shoot water thru the oilpan nozzles. The water stream (squirt) will then go bulls-eye into a hole in the target gauge. If the squirt of water doesn't go into the hole; use a 5/32 straight punch, stuck into the nozzle, to gently adjust the oilpan nozzles till the water goes bulls-eye into the hole. Very simple tool.

In short the "target" gauge is just 2 pieces of metal formed into a "template". All it does is give you the right hole position to shoot the water into. They are so much in desire that the $35 to rent one is reasonable and the $400 is just an "escrow" that you can usually put on your credit card that will be refunded when ya give the tool back.
It is very-very hard to make one yourself because of the bends in the metal.

The other tool needed to set "dippers" on the 216 rod caps is the #J9692A (235 is J1646 or J1541). The important part of this tool is that it is composed of 3 round bars of metal along a flat metal bar. It is a simple depth guage. The round bars of metal are a simply made to a certain length for a "go-no-go" setting on your oilpan trough depth; and the depth of the little dippers that your rods will hang down to "scoop" oil from the oilpan troughs.

It is much simpler than I described it! Although the tool looks the same for the 216 & 235 the dimensions to set the dippers and troughs ARE NOT, because the stroke on the 235 engine is different.

I have the "target tool" but somebody ripped me off for the "connecting rod dipper and trough tool". I made an easy dipper/trough gauge for my 1952 235 by using (3)3/8" round dowel rods and a 1/4" flat bar of metal. I think I have the 235 dimensions somewhere in my shop notes, and I may have the 216 dimensions also; but I can't guarentee it. If I find them I will post them as a jpg link in the next few days.

The dipper/trough tool is also available thru a few Chevy Parts suppliers (Maybe Chev of 40's, Chevy Duty, Jim Carters Truck parts?) Once you rent one, make a copy. I got my tool and dimensions from some very helpful guys in the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America (VCCA). I appreciated their help so much I joined the organization.

Luke: the shimming and de-shimming is really just a simple piece of metal, a "shim" that looks like the leaf of a feeler guage. These little "leafs" of metal are used on almost all 6 cylinder Chevies from the 1930's to the late 1950's to add/subtract some space and adjust engine bearings.
You do NOT need shims on the rod bearings if you use the "inserts".
You remove some shims on the babbit rods as the engines gets worn. About every 10,000 miles??, or after extreme service they need to be checked by feeling with your fingers.
In short you put some in to make the bearing loose; take some away to tighten. Your rebuild kit will usually have them and the Shop Manual covers how to add and remove them to get the right feel for the bearing tightness. Easy to do for the amount of labor, it just takes time and the "feel" in your fingers.

Finally, sorry about the length of my post. I need a go-no-go tool to shut me up sometimes

[This message has been edited by mr. slugo (edited 08-07-2002).]

 
2blu52 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 14108

Age: 80
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
Re: 216 Engine
08-08-02 03:15 PM - Post#37443    
    In response to

I built two 216's one in a 38 chev and the other in a 51, these engines were badly abused by me as I was still into street racing. I must admit that after a 0.40 over bore I changed to aluminum pistons which put considerably less stress on the rods and crank, I also trimmed a bunch of weight off the flywheel on both these cars. They would flat move and I did not have a problem with the bottom end at all.
"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
agent009 
Contributor
Posts: 199
agent009
Loc: The backseat of your car....
Reg: 06-12-07
06-26-07 11:06 AM - Post#1194737    
    In response to 2blu52

This is a great read...
Shouldnt be buried so deep, so...
Bump!
The Dude Abides
1950 Fleetline Deluxe

Stream 'The Greasers Lunchbox' at 88.1 Kdhx - St Louis Independent Media



 
Royer 
Needs to Get Out More Member
Posts: 11411

Loc: Bloomfield Hills, Michiga...
Reg: 09-25-01
06-26-07 11:20 AM - Post#1194755    
    In response to agent009

If you don't have a gauge for checking the positioning of the dipper troughs, you can pack some modeling clay into each trough. Then temporarilly install the pan using a fresh gasket and torque all bolts to spec. Carefully rotate the engine by hand through at least one complete revolution. Remove the pan and check to see that the troughs are set at the right depth.

I agree that the nozzles only very rarely get bent. However they DID have a tendency to become plugged if the oil wasn't changed regularly. Therefore, it pays to check for any possible blockage VERY CAREFULLY to avoid trouble with the "scoop & dipper" engines. And bay all means, I agree that substituting aluminum pistons is an excellent move to reduce bearing loads. Chevy just didn't want to spend the additional money back in the fifties and earlier.

Royer

 
MrMack 
Senior Member
Posts: 1211
MrMack
Loc: Comanche, TX
Reg: 12-07-04
06-26-07 09:45 PM - Post#1195258    
    In response to Royer

If you use some thick chassis grease or Lubroplate Waterpump grease instead of modeling clay you won't have to clean the clay out of the troughs and the rod dippers. If the nozzles get bent out of place it won't be long before you "Hear" about it!
Also babbit rods set up correctly are better at disapateing the friction heat from the crankshaft than inserted rods, inserted rods also have babbit. Just like babbit rods an inserted rod that don't get oil will go to knocking and either type that don't get proper lubrication will melt the babbit and knock and ruin the crankshaft..
Drive your Old Chevrolets every day!and see the Great U.S.A!


 
Royer 
Needs to Get Out More Member
Posts: 11411

Loc: Bloomfield Hills, Michiga...
Reg: 09-25-01
06-27-07 05:38 AM - Post#1195361    
    In response to MrMack

Agree: you've got to get oil to those rods regardless of wheteher babbit or insert type.

 
Scott Andrews 
Member
Posts: 21

Loc: Dacula, GA USA
Reg: 02-27-06
06-28-07 11:23 AM - Post#1196521    
    In response to Royer

  • Royer Said:
I recall seeing an ad (a number of ads over a period of time, actually) in Hemmings Motor News for an outfit that specialized in rifle-drilling Chevy 216 cranks so as to convert the engines to a full-pressure system...

Royer



Royer,

You may have been thinking of Beck's Machine and Tool in Santa Maria, California, phone: (805) 925-7411; they're still out there. Here's a link for them through Inliner's International: http://www.inliners.org/becks/

Scott Andrews
Dacula, GA
Scott Andrews
Dacula, GA


 
RhinoRay 
"7th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 527
RhinoRay
Age: 61
Loc: Kelseyville
Reg: 02-27-07
06-29-07 10:12 PM - Post#1197658    
    In response to Scott Andrews

This is a great read. I didn't do any of this stuff just was careful not to mess whith what was there when I took off the pan. It cleaned well, ran hot water through the nozels to clean them out and they all shot into the trough the same. I called it good, put it back together and it works fine. Maybe I got lucky.
RhinoRay
52 Chevy Coupe
Kelseyville, CA
Slide Show Of The Project
Intake, Exhaust, Tranny


 
FAST 52 
Contributor
Posts: 224
FAST 52
Loc: Near Winnipeg Canada
Reg: 01-17-13
04-20-13 08:34 PM - Post#2337512    
    In response to RhinoRay

This was a great read. it has given me a new respect for my 216 engine. i really want to keep and drive my 52 with this engine, hope I can.....

 
53belair 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1217
53belair
Age: 58
Loc: Ellerslie, Georgia
Reg: 03-25-07
04-21-13 10:46 AM - Post#2337655    
    In response to FAST 52

I got my 51 with 216 at about 80,000 miles. I was 16 yrs old and was not kind to this car. I snatched and jerked it. Replaced the trans (it was cheap and easy to find a trans at the u-pullit)at least 3 times from killing the syncros by trying to keep up with V8s spinning the tires and laying down rubber. Course we all know that I didn't keep up. I drove it about 20 miles to college every day by the time I was 18. 15 of those miles were on 4 lane. I drove the hell out of the old fleetline, consistently around 70 mph. Eventually it succumbed to my idiocy. That didn't happen until about 140,000 miles.
  • FAST 52 Said:
This was a great read. it has given me a new respect for my 216 engine. i really want to keep and drive my 52 with this engine, hope I can.....




 
RAM_51 
Senior Member
Posts: 2322
RAM_51
Loc: Yakima, WA. USA
Reg: 12-28-02
04-21-13 05:54 PM - Post#2337788    
    In response to

  • Quote:
Back in the late 50's early 60's it was quite common at rebuild time to switch from babbited rods to insert bearing rods. I don't know if this is available anymore



They can still be had..the Clevite 77 bearing number is CB503B

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Clevite-77-CB503B -020-Conn...
DEFORMATION CAUSED BY TENSION IS
STRETCHING
THE RESULT OF DEFORMATION CAUSED BY COMPRESSION IS
UPSETTING


 
This Forum is Sponsored by

bobsclassicchevy.com
 Page 1 of 2 12
Icon Legend Permissions Topic Options
Report Post

Quote Post

Quick Reply

Print Topic

Email Topic

4520 Views
FusionBB
FusionBB™ Version 2.1
©2003-2006 InteractivePHP, Inc.
Execution time: 0.143 seconds.   Total Queries: 13   Zlib Compression is on.
All times are (GMT -0800) Pacific. Current time is 10:03 AM
Top