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Username Post: How many?        (Topic#347971)
SteveW 
Senior Member
Posts: 1541

Loc: Shreveport
Reg: 04-24-02
10-30-17 07:54 PM - Post#2712754    

How many coats of clear can you paint on base coat clear coat paint? I want to put plenty of clear so I can wet sand really well. Also what grit paper should I use before buffing it out? Thanks for any help.

SteveW


 




RAM_51 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 4767
RAM_51
Loc: Yakima, WA. USA
Reg: 12-28-02
11-02-17 05:31 PM - Post#2713098    
    In response to SteveW

2 to 3 coats is the number that is generally recommended from any particular manufacturer. It is best to consult the "P" [product] sheet for the brand of clear that you plan on using. Half the battle is getting the clear to lay down flat during application. This will translate into less orange peel and subsequently less sanding. I would suggest doing some experimentation first to get the desired results before you begin applying clear to your project. At the shop I worked at the painters generally got the clear on smooth enough that the detail guy would start with 600 grit if memory serves and work his way up to 1500 grit.

1951 Fleetline
'51 Fleetline DeLuxe 2 DOOR SEDAN (Fathom Green)
'51 Styleline Special BUSINESS COUPE (Shadow Gray)
'53 6500 Dump Bed (Oxidized Red)
'50 Styleline DeLuxe 4 DOOR SEDAN (Mist Green)


 
kool53 
Member
Posts: 802

Loc: Mukwonago, WI
Reg: 06-18-04
11-02-17 07:09 PM - Post#2713107    
    In response to RAM_51

Ram_51 is right but ya gotta remember that it all starts with a good base. Block your primer and use a guide coat. Good quality materials- no shortcuts. That "depth" you see in a showcar finish comes from a good foundation NOT 12 coats of clear.

Jay


 
wagonman100 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 13967
wagonman100
Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
11-02-17 07:35 PM - Post#2713112    
    In response to kool53

It is true that the paint is 90% preparation and 10% application. I wouldn't start with 600 though. Especially if not experienced with cutting and buffing. I'd start with 1000 grit. Also remember that the paint is thinner over body lines and near the edges of panels.

Jay
Some days it's not worth chewing through the restraints.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon


 
RAM_51 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 4767
RAM_51
Loc: Yakima, WA. USA
Reg: 12-28-02
11-02-17 07:45 PM - Post#2713117    
    In response to wagonman100

kool53 and wagonman100...both good points.

1951 Fleetline
'51 Fleetline DeLuxe 2 DOOR SEDAN (Fathom Green)
'51 Styleline Special BUSINESS COUPE (Shadow Gray)
'53 6500 Dump Bed (Oxidized Red)
'50 Styleline DeLuxe 4 DOOR SEDAN (Mist Green)


 
SteveW 
Senior Member
Posts: 1541

Loc: Shreveport
Reg: 04-24-02
11-03-17 05:37 PM - Post#2713201    
    In response to SteveW

One guy told me I could put 3 coats of clear , let them dry then the next day 3 more coats of clear. Can somebody tell me if I can do that. I have sanded pass the clear before and don't want to do it again. Thanks for all the help. Steve



 
kool53 
Member
Posts: 802

Loc: Mukwonago, WI
Reg: 06-18-04
11-03-17 07:45 PM - Post#2713215    
    In response to SteveW

If you are that worried about sanding through put an additional coat on the first day for peace of mind if nothing else. Flash time between coats will increase with each one so dont rush it. Like mentioned above, never sand over sharp edges. Use tape to cover them when wet sanding so you dont accidentally hit them. Use a few drops of dish soap and let the block/paper do the work.

Jay


 
wagonman100 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 13967
wagonman100
Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
11-11-17 03:35 PM - Post#2714050    
    In response to kool53

If you do additional coats of clear later, wait at least a few days. Let the solvents come out of the paint. Wait longer if it wasn't baked in a booth. Then sand the clear to make sure you get good adhesion to the existing paint. You can just scuff it with some Scuff Stuff and a Scotchbrite pad to give it some tooth.

Jay
Some days it's not worth chewing through the restraints.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
1978 El Camino Kustomized
1972 Monte Carlo
1957 210 handyman wagon
1957 Nomad sport wagon


 
Hugomiller 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 108
Hugomiller
Age: 67
Loc: Florida and UK
Reg: 05-02-17
11-26-17 11:21 AM - Post#2715791    
    In response to wagonman100

I always reckon to get a good enough finish straight from the gun. I generally spray outdoors so may have a few dust spots to buff out, but that's about it. maybe if I were doing a concours winner I would sand & polish it afterwards - but I certainly would never attack it with anything coarser than 1200 paper. I always do 3 fairly heavy coats of clearcoat - or solid color - with a 1.8 tip. That is much larger than most people use but it works for me. I just did a front fender for my daily runabout, & I used some old clearcoat that had got a bit thick sitting on the shelf. I realised this when I started spraying, but I poured it on really heavy & it flowed out like a dream. I thinned it a bit after the first coat but there's still a good layer of clearcoat on there! Don't mix it too thin, don't use too slow a reducer & don't be scared of runs - it's mind over matter!



 




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