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Username Post: Welding backer        (Topic#345586)
Ole61 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 149
Ole61
Age: 55
Loc: Ohio
Reg: 08-11-16
06-22-17 03:44 PM - Post#2697081    

Hi,I was wondering if anyone uses or has used the magnetic copper welding backers,I'm doing sheet metal work on 61 belair and need every advantage I can thanks



 




wagonman100 
Super Senior Member
Posts: 13966
wagonman100
Loc: Baltimore, MD
Reg: 11-27-04
06-22-17 07:50 PM - Post#2697121    
    In response to Ole61

I've never used one but it should work well. The magnet will hold the piece in place and the weld won't stick to the copper and act as a heat sink. I personally don't use any backers, I just weld up holes without any.

Jay
Some days it's not worth chewing through the restraints.

1999 Silverado Z71 4X4 extra-cab short bed
1983 Malibu Fauxmad - tubbed
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1957 Nomad sport wagon


 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 3991

Reg: 12-29-02
06-23-17 04:10 PM - Post#2697213    
    In response to Ole61

If the pieces butt together tight you shouldn't need a backer.

I've had times where I had a bit of a hole to fill. I tried a piece of flattened copper pipe and I managed to weld it to the car. A piece of 1/4" copper bar stock worked OK though.



 
Ole61 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 149
Ole61
Age: 55
Loc: Ohio
Reg: 08-11-16
06-23-17 06:48 PM - Post#2697237    
    In response to wagonman100

Wagonman thanks for the reply,the magnet and copper plate would work but it has to be a pretty flat surface took a ride to Eastwood and checked them out if surface not flat leaves space between copper and metal



 
Ole61 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 149
Ole61
Age: 55
Loc: Ohio
Reg: 08-11-16
06-23-17 06:54 PM - Post#2697239    
    In response to 65_Impala

Thanks for reply 65 impala,is it better to have a tight fit or slight gap in piece ,I found some thin brass at work gonna try



 
RAM_51 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 4760
RAM_51
Loc: Yakima, WA. USA
Reg: 12-28-02
06-23-17 09:14 PM - Post#2697255    
    In response to Ole61

If I'm welding holes, I get small slugs from washer bins that you can find in some of the older hardware stores. You can find them in the bottom of the bin. You may have to file the hole just slightly larger to get the "plug" to fall snugly into place. Tack, grind, and repeat!







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SteveW 
Senior Member
Posts: 1541

Loc: Shreveport
Reg: 04-24-02
06-24-17 02:12 PM - Post#2697323    
    In response to Ole61

Flat "Ceramic weld backing" works great you can find it on ebay. It has metal tape on both sides of the ceramic to hold it in place. Great for back up. Leaves the weld clean on back side. Lots better than copper. Just get flat Ceramic. Shop around some places a lot cheaper than others. Watch video to end and see back side of plate.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k0Sj5m1uTE
You can use it with any type of welding ,Stick,Mig or Tig. When welding Stainless it wont sugar on back side.





 
65_Impala 
Very Senior Member
Posts: 3991

Reg: 12-29-02
06-24-17 09:34 PM - Post#2697358    
    In response to Ole61

  • Ole61 Said:
Thanks for reply 65 impala,is it better to have a tight fit or slight gap in piece ,I found some thin brass at work gonna try



MIG welder? probably a slight gap but very small. I find touching or almost touching works decent for body steel and if you're fairly new at it then weld much hotter and faster then you'd expect to works best. Get it right and not much grinding is required to make the joint flat. I started welding at 2 on my welder and first thought it was good but now weld at about 4.

If it's a TIG welder then it pretty much has to touch. You'll have a tough time bridging any gaps. I haven't done much TIG yet, but I have welded butt splices with no filler and no grinding required. It's softer and it hammers to relieve the welding shrinkage much easier.



 
Ole61 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 149
Ole61
Age: 55
Loc: Ohio
Reg: 08-11-16
06-25-17 08:18 AM - Post#2697412    
    In response to 65_Impala

Thanks for all the info,might welding with miller cricket xl 65impala





 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 27306
Rick_L
Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
06-26-17 04:57 PM - Post#2697607    
    In response to Ole61

A piece of copper, any form, works for welding a hole. I use a piece of copper tube about 8" long. I beat 4" of it flat with a hammer, then bend it 45 degrees at the transition from flat to tube. The tube ends up being a nice handle.

As said, once the hole gets big enough, welding a round disc in the hole is a better way. I'd say that's somewhere around a 3/8" hole.

The copper tube works great if you can position it with your non-welding hand on the back side. Recently I've seen some magnetic holders that hold a piece of copper over a hole for welding. Eastwood may have something, or you can make your own using a dial indicator magnetic holder. This would work great on a big panel like a quarter panel or firewall.



 




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