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Username Post: Jaguar Front Install in 49-54        (Topic#343147)
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 835
cbmkr56
Age: 61
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
03-07-17 07:13 PM - Post#2680278    

Just another little bit of info for a Jaguar Install in 49-54 Chevy Cars. I installed this on in a car we are doing for a driver and did it a little different.

First off i made 2- 12.5" long by 6" wide 3/8" cold rolled steel plates to bolt to the frame rails where the original suspension mounted. The 8 holes were center punched after clamping to put all 8 holes in the correct place. We then drilled them out to 5/16" of an inch and tapped them with a 3/8" -16 tap. I then cut off the front suspension horns 1.75" ahead of the alignment hole that you use to set the wheelbase. I then took the alignment hole and made it an elongated hole removing 3/16" of material to the inside of each side and keeping the front edge straight. This lets you use a long bolt as shown in the picture to align the suspension so you can check your measurements and clamp it in place to tack the mounting plate to the Jaguar Suspension K member.
As shown we welded the plates in place after trimming and drilled and tapped the holes in the rear where k member did not let the bolts go all the way through. After it was finished i used one of the front mounting holes on each side and threaded a bolt up from the bottom to give us a point to align the plates to the 8 holes in the frame while we put all the bolts in. This i just another way we have found to do this and is the lowest ride height you can get without changing the suspension geometry. 2 pictures in the next post.

Attachment: jaguar_1.jpg (613.78 KB) 5 View(s)




Attachment: jaguar_2.jpg (379.6 KB) 4 View(s)




Attachment: jaguar_3.jpg (215.27 KB) 4 View(s)






 
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 835
cbmkr56
Age: 61
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
03-07-17 07:18 PM - Post#2680280    
    In response to cbmkr56

Here are the last 2 pics, We checked the wheelbase and were within .030 of an inch. The whole job took less than 5 hours including the mtg plates and removing and installing the jag suspension.

This suspension was from an 86 Vanded Plas 6 cyl.

Attachment: jaguar_4.jpg (309.45 KB) 5 View(s)




Attachment: jaguar_5.jpg (289.02 KB) 4 View(s)






 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2707
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
03-11-17 06:03 PM - Post#2680952    
    In response to cbmkr56

Hi CB Maker, Great post. We normally blast the whole of the torque arm off but it can be useful for aligning as you have done.
I hope you don't mind me adding something. To give the plate some replacement strength for the old jag torque arm. (The bit with the big isolater bush.) We usually run the gusset on the inside almost to the front of a plate like that.
It supports the chassis and allows you to go down a couple of thicknesses of plate. You may not want thinner plate if you are bolting though.

Please excuse my manky sketches but hopefully they give you some idea of what I am talking about. The major force of braking is trying to turn the suspension under the car and this gusseting eliminates that action. Obviously there are lots of ways of doing this and it depends what is to hand.

Cheers Kiwi

Attachment: CB_Jag_gusset.jpg (138.31 KB) 5 View(s)




Attachment: CB_Jag_2_gusset.jpg (127.13 KB) 6 View(s)




48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 03-11-17 06:04 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 835
cbmkr56
Age: 61
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
03-12-17 06:24 AM - Post#2681032    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

We have added that plate in the past but with the amount of surface area where the suspension contacts frame plate,it is does not really serve any purpose. The ones we added in the past were on the outside of the torque arm up to the frame plate . If it was installed in the center and did flex it would flex and crack the center of the torque arm.



 
cbmkr56 
Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 835
cbmkr56
Age: 61
Loc: Basehor Ks
Reg: 02-11-13
03-12-17 01:15 PM - Post#2681082    
    In response to cbmkr56

Ok , I was adding the sway bar to this one and decided to show you how i cut the horns to fit with the sway bar. I also will show you 2 different ways with plates or gussets to support the front horn or K member,The horns are cut at an angle so the suspension can travel and give you plenty of clearance.
If you use a 3/8" or larger plate for the frame mount i feel what i had already done is more than enough. The 1.5" x 3/16" flat bar shown in the first picture will also work .I went ahead even though we do not need it made 2 - 4.5" x 4" gussets and welded them to the suspension k member and to the 3/8" cold rolled plate i used for the frame mount.It is now pretty much bullet proof with tons of extra support.

If you are doing one of these and use a 1/4" or thinner hot rolled steel for your frame plate add the gusset to the bottom of the plate and front of the k member for the extra support as shown in picture 3.

I will be doing another one in the future and am contemplating building a front cross-member with brackets to hold the original rubber bushings on the Jag and also use the single rear rubber mount.

Attachment: jag_brkt_1.jpg (250.67 KB) 5 View(s)




Attachment: jag_brkt_2.jpg (272.65 KB) 4 View(s)




Attachment: jag_brkt_3.jpg (304.41 KB) 4 View(s)






 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2707
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
03-12-17 07:02 PM - Post#2681138    
    In response to cbmkr56

Hi CBMkr. Those brackets will do the trick. As I said there are a lot of ways of doing this. In our modification rules 'Called code of Compliance" we have a section on gussets and braces and where members can join. So that may make My approach different from yours. Now that you have done a few I bet you wish you had a hundred more front ends in a barn somewhere. They are so easy.

We cut off the entire torque arms and the engine mount at the Back of the jag member and dress and clean that up.
We use thinner plate as both the chassis and the Jag member are in the order of about 1/8" thick or so. However that is not so good for threading and tapping so we bolt and nut, plus stitch weld.

I have seen a conversion here where the Ford pick up used the original Jag Isolators and mounted the engine off the Jag subframe as per original jag. It was nicely done and the vehicle was nice and quiet and smooth however I don't think that was the reason.
Those Big isolaters on the jag have a big NVH job to do because the jag car is a total unibody. No subframes or half frames. Whereas the isolation in a chassis car is more the body mounts and sound deadener.
I am not saying it won't do anything, but I don't think it is nearly as important on a chassis car. And although a PU has the room for that a lot of cars don't.

Cheers Kiwi




48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 
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