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Username Post: Oakie bushing        (Topic#341691)
Airlifter 
"2nd Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 293
Airlifter
Age: 71
Loc: Tazewell county, Virginia
Reg: 06-07-15
01-05-17 08:31 AM - Post#2669411    

What is the purpose of the Oakie bushing? Is it to dampen vibration or act as an oil seal. Since I have the transmission out I want to try to do everything I can to make sure there are no leaks from this area. I am ordering the torque tube ball seal kit.

I am going to replace the bushing anyway. I was just wondering about its purpose.

Thanks, Pete

1951 styline deluxe sport coupe w/54 powerglide


Edited by Airlifter on 01-05-17 08:31 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 

drtyler 
Contributor
Posts: 427

Loc: Atlanta, Georgia
Reg: 05-06-10
01-05-17 10:00 AM - Post#2669432    
    In response to Airlifter

Bushing stabilizes driveshaft, and the seal prevents gear oil/atf from entering the differential.

Here is a good article:

https://www.fillingstation.com/articles/torquetubebu shingreplace.htm

Since your car is a Powerglide, ATF lubricates the universal joint, not gear oil.



Edited by drtyler on 01-05-17 10:02 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
2blu52 
"16th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 17677
2blu52
Age: 83
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
01-05-17 10:25 AM - Post#2669442    
    In response to Airlifter

The old way of repairing the bushing was to dismantle the rear end, pull the drive shaft out of the tube and drive the seal and bushing out the front of the tube. With the Oakie Bushing you do not go to all that work. You use a special tool to remove part of the bushing and then drive the Oakie Bushing and seal in from the front. Saves a ton of work, but it is a one time only fix. If you need to do it again then you resort to the way the shop manual describes it.

"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
Airlifter 
"2nd Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 293
Airlifter
Age: 71
Loc: Tazewell county, Virginia
Reg: 06-07-15
01-06-17 04:46 PM - Post#2669713    
    In response to 2blu52

I checked the movement of the drive shaft on the front end and it seemed tight in the tube. I have never noticed any vibration while driving the car.

I have so many other things going on with the car now I think I might just replace the front seal at this time.

I am not at all familiar with the torque tube and I don't want to get anything else disassembled until I start getting something back together.

Thanks again for the input, Pete

1951 styline deluxe sport coupe w/54 powerglide


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-06-17 05:08 PM - Post#2669722    
    In response to Airlifter

Hi Guys, Great article from the filling station site, thanks Dan. Anyone know why the setup is called an "Oakie" bushing? Just curious its not important.

Cheers Kiwi


48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 25384
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
01-06-17 10:38 PM - Post#2669775    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

  • Bel Air kiwi Said:
....Anyone know why the setup is called an "Oakie" bushing?....


Depression-era migrants from Oklahoma were called "Okies". They would employ all kinds of makeshift repairs in order to keep their broken-down vehicles running long enough to reach their destination, California. Read "The Grapes of Wrath" or watch the film for a fictionalized account of a very real historical phenomenon.

The Okie (or Oakie) bushing is another type of makeshift repair, thus the name.

Ray

There's a line between good and evil no wider than a razor's edge - D.S. James Hathaway quoting from The Night Keeper


 
bobt 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 99

Loc: colonial heights va
Reg: 06-28-14
01-07-17 05:48 AM - Post#2669800    
    In response to Airlifter

If you're not losing Transmission gear oil and gaining gear oil in the rear end, I would not replace the original seal with an "oakie bushing/seal. To remove the original seal, you would have to purchase or rent a special puller for about $60.00 and then buy the "oakie", about $85.00. Don't get me wrong. The oakie bushing is far better than the original but if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Good luck. bobt



 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-07-17 06:46 AM - Post#2669803    
    In response to raycow

Hi Ray, I have read Steinbeck and sort of new the association with Oklahoma but didn't know it translated into what the English would call a "Heath Robinson" and we would call a "Bush Mechanic" repair.

Is Oakie sort of like shade tree mechanic?

Cheers Kiwi

48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 25384
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
01-07-17 09:31 PM - Post#2669993    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

  • Bel Air kiwi Said:
....Is Oakie sort of like shade tree mechanic?....


No, not really. Think of an Okie repair as more like an improvisation brought about by a combination of poverty and desperation.

A shade tree mechanic is a non-professional who generally performs more traditional repairs, but in a non-traditional workspace. I would expect his work to be more correct and longer lasting than that of an Okie.

A better comparison for quality of work might be "Bubba", but here I think the overriding influence would be ignorance or laziness. Bubba is someone who shouldn't be working on cars, but who chooses to do so anyway. An Okie didn't have any choice.

None of these would be considered a "Heath Robinson" here. The closest US equivalent to H.R. would be Rube Goldberg, although their drawing styles were quite different. IMO, the H.R. designs were more fantastical than R.G., and therefore less believable (to me). I have heard of people who constructed replicas of R.G. machines which actually worked.

I like the sound of "Bush Mechanic", but to me that implies a response to necessity rather than poverty, and again, a higher quality of work than an Okie. We used to have a TV series here about a guy like that, MacGyver. Have you heard of him?

Ray

There's a line between good and evil no wider than a razor's edge - D.S. James Hathaway quoting from The Night Keeper


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-07-17 11:57 PM - Post#2670014    
    In response to raycow

Hi Ray, Yes very familiar with MacGyver, but that was more applied science in the real world than the shade tree, but certainly necessity and circumstance driven. That would be a mild insult to a tradesman here and would be usually jovial.
"That looks a bit MacGyver". Our polite equivalent of a "Bubba" repair would be a "Bogan" job and it is definitely very derisive however I prefer the more direct insult of "Penis Fingers".

Cheers Kiwi

48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 
rrausch 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 13126
rrausch
Loc: L.A, Cal. & St. Louis...
Reg: 04-07-03
01-08-17 10:42 AM - Post#2670085    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

I have a lengthy and successful history of Hillbilly engineering myself, being as I am, a proud graduate of the HillWilliam Academy for Applied Mechanical Arts.




1953 210 Convertible, 261 with dual Carter YF 966S carbs, P.S., Remote Bendix P.B. Booster... shade-tree restoration about done.




 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-08-17 11:47 AM - Post#2670104    
    In response to rrausch

Hi Robert. "It aint all about book learning Cletus"

Cheers Kiwi

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48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-08-17 12:03 PM - Post#2670108    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

ctd: There's a funny story about one of those bar stool go karts I built with a class of my senior Auto students in what you would call shop class.
They didn't have much basic engineering in the prescription and a lot of these boys were more into that side of it. So as a little side project we built one of these out of a go kart one kid had bought in that didn't go, some bits and pieces from other kids and a Lab stool acquired from the science department.
Everything about it sort of fit the syllabus right up until the point of the road test.
The guys were hooning around the staff back car park where I told them to stay but one idiot thought it would be a good idea to go outside the front of the school, do a couple of laps around the flag pole in front of the admin block and the principals office then out onto the street in front of traffic.

Boy did the s**t hit the fan over that one.

Cheers Kiwi


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48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 01-08-17 12:05 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Cruzin Okie 
Contributor
Posts: 621
Cruzin Okie
Loc: Jay, Oklahoma
Reg: 10-26-11
01-08-17 12:26 PM - Post#2670114    
    In response to raycow


"A shade tree mechanic is a non-professional who generally performs more traditional repairs, but in a non-traditional workspace. I would expect his work to be more correct and longer lasting than that of an Okie."

DO WHAT RAY???

Johnnie

1950 styleline deluxe sports coupe, 350 cid, TH 400, nova rear end. Gen IV Vintage air. SOLD!
1953 210 4 Door, 235 with Powerglide. All original except for the 1954 hood bird.

John 3:16



 
Ray P W 
Contributor
Posts: 298

Reg: 09-30-15
01-08-17 12:28 PM - Post#2670115    
    In response to Airlifter

Good morning Airlifter.

I don't know if it's Okie, Hillbilly, Bubba or Shade Tree but here's the method that worked for me in extracting torque tube bushings and the seal using odds and ends I had around the shop:

http://vcca.org/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/334876...

Although mine was an exception because of the 1 1/32" seal ID, seals are generally pretty standard and, if you have the dimensions, are available from bearing suppliers. There is no need to get them from antique car/truck specialty suppliers.

Ray W



 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 25384
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
01-08-17 01:50 PM - Post#2670146    
    In response to Cruzin Okie

Johnnie, I swear I never knew before now that we had a real live self-proclaimed Okie on the forum. Please believe that my attempt to define the term was intended purely in the historical (depression-era) sense.

Ray

There's a line between good and evil no wider than a razor's edge - D.S. James Hathaway quoting from The Night Keeper


 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 25384
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
01-08-17 01:56 PM - Post#2670147    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

  • Bel Air kiwi Said:
....I prefer the more direct insult of "Penis Fingers"....


That is definitely a new one on me. I shall make sure to try out that term the next time a suitable opportunity presents itself. I shall also report back here about the reaction it provokes, assuming of course that I survive.

Ray

There's a line between good and evil no wider than a razor's edge - D.S. James Hathaway quoting from The Night Keeper


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-08-17 04:37 PM - Post#2670173    
    In response to raycow

Hi Ray, in the interests of self preservation you definitely have to pick your moment using that one. Best saved for describing a persons skill set to a third party , or when you have a significant size or speed advantage over the subject first person recipient.
So I have only used it in the first person as an adult Male dealing with spotty little apprentices or shop class students. It tends to have more more impact then as you have to explain it to them as well. I had a kid nearly wet himself with laughter in front of the class. It wasn't the guy I called "Penis Fingers". It was his mate who was showing him how to do something on a computer and made a dog's breakfast of it.
He said whats that mean. So I said "F***k's everything he touches". He blurted out "Yeah that's him" and fell off his chair laughing.

I think our Version of "Shade Tree" might be "Backyard Mechanic" a bit like yours but not necessarily a trained and formally certified tradesman. So could be a hobbiest, a handy man, a restorer. Genuinely well intentioned but not necessarily highly skilled. If they were rough, shoddy, or incompetent they would be downgraded to "Bush or Westie" mechanic. For "Westie" you would substitute maybe Oakie, or Hillbilly, or Redneck. In Australia they would go for "Bogun" or "Feral" depending on the risk and degree of insult intended.
My apologies to anyone who's sensibilities are affronted by this, we are merely exchanging information and some of it is a bit locker room but that's not the point. Some NZ terms that fit this pattern were race based here and I simply won't use them.


Cheers Kiwi

As an aside to this, the boy who asked me what P fingers mean't was the head prefect, a top scholar, a great surfer and skier, captain of the school soccer and tennis teams, leader of the school faith community and a devout christian. He had already committed to further divinity studies and two years of volunteer mission work in poor communities in the pacific.
He died on the school field of a congenital heart defect while representing the school only a month or two later. I am immensely proud of my own son but he is simply not like this boy, if we are honest, almost none of any of our children are. He was just simply too good to be among us and I pray for his family when I think of him.


48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 01-08-17 04:57 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Cruzin Okie 
Contributor
Posts: 621
Cruzin Okie
Loc: Jay, Oklahoma
Reg: 10-26-11
01-08-17 07:49 PM - Post#2670191    
    In response to raycow

Ray, I am enjoying following this and Laughing a lot. I am Indeed an Okie. I was born in California, when my folks went there to find work. Then when I was three we moved back to Oklahoma.

Johnnie

1950 styleline deluxe sports coupe, 350 cid, TH 400, nova rear end. Gen IV Vintage air. SOLD!
1953 210 4 Door, 235 with Powerglide. All original except for the 1954 hood bird.

John 3:16



 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-08-17 09:59 PM - Post#2670200    
    In response to Cruzin Okie

Hey Johnnie, If you were born in California and went back to become an Oakie does that make you a Coakie?
Unless of course you were conceived in Oklahoma and only born in California in which case can you autograph my Grapes of Wrath book cause I don't know anybody else that was in it.

Cheers Kiwi

48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 
raycow 
Honored Member
Posts: 25384
raycow
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Reg: 11-26-02
01-08-17 10:56 PM - Post#2670204    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

Kiwi, I stumbled across this by accident while I was searching for something else, but it clearly seems to fit in with this discussion. Were you aware of this term before now?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_8_wire

Ray

There's a line between good and evil no wider than a razor's edge - D.S. James Hathaway quoting from The Night Keeper


 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-09-17 12:49 AM - Post#2670213    
    In response to raycow

Kiwi, I stumbled across this by accident while I was searching for something else, but it clearly seems to fit in with this discussion. Were you aware of this term before now?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_8_wire

Ray

DO WHAT RAY

I was born here, I am a trained Mechanic and a Product Design Engineer, how could I not know of that paragon of the Kiwi Lexicon.

Actually its predominately nostalgic BS. NZ is the youngest country in the world, and by that I mean the last one discovered and settled by anyone. Australia has been inhabited for in excess of 5000 years, NZ's oldest human activity is probably 700 years and at the most 1000 years. It could be as little as four hundred years. European settlement is only 250 years ago and sovereignty as a Nation a little over 200 years.
So we are a pioneer nation and very sparsely populated. Up until WW2 NZ was predominantly a rural country with two tiny city centers in each Island. So by necessity everybody had to make what they had last and keep fixing it or do without. If you broke your plow then you probably had to travel three days to get to a place were you could begin the process of dealing with the problem. They would send off by ship mail to a city and two or three weeks later the answer would come back if they had one or not. If they didn't the order would have to be sent to Australia, two weeks by ship return, or England, three months by ship each way. And it would cost a small fortune. We had lots of Blacksmiths and farriers and wheel rights etc but no steel mill, no power stations, no smelters.
Everything you had had to be patched up and rebuilt as often as you could. So the whole country started out as Okies and just about everything pre 1900 was done by hand or work animal.





48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 01-09-17 01:11 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
rrausch 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 13126
rrausch
Loc: L.A, Cal. & St. Louis...
Reg: 04-07-03
01-09-17 10:09 AM - Post#2670271    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

I remember my mom and pop talking about the dust storms of the 1930's. The entire sky would turn dark at noon and even tho the windows were closed there might be 1/2 inch of fine dust on the window sills afterwards. My mom was a young nurse at the time and my Pop lived on the family farm. We still had just enough rainfall in Missouri that they could farm enough to put food on the table--that and they owned the farm free and clear were the only things that kept them from heading out to Cal. like so many.

1953 210 Convertible, 261 with dual Carter YF 966S carbs, P.S., Remote Bendix P.B. Booster... shade-tree restoration about done.




 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-09-17 05:06 PM - Post#2670326    
    In response to rrausch

Hi Robert, Jeez you must be old!! LOL My parents were born in 1929 and 1931 so they were babies of the great depression, and lived through the austerity of the 2nd World War as well. Dad just missed national service in post war Japan, and was not drafted for Korea as he was already married and that may not have had national conscription. (The Draft.).
I was born in 1959 so I am a post war baby boomer who grew up in extremely prosperous times and have an enormously inflated sense of self entitlement. Free Education, free health care, free dentistry, full employment, high wages, the whole nine yards. Skilled labor was so scarce that plenty of tradesman I knew would tell the boss I want four weeks paid holiday not two. They would get it too, because everyone new a certified person could walk out of their job in December and get a new one with better paying conditions when they started back at the end of summer.
Lots of guys did it so it worked well.
Staff turnover is a huge cost to businesses and the people I did my indentured apprenticeship with new that well. While most of my classmates at trade school were on minimum wage I was receiving regular productivity and achievement bonuses. I new I was well looked after so I didn't jump ship the moment my contract expired and continued there for many years. When i finally decide to move off the tools I was offered working management positions all around the country but that wasn't the direction I wanted, so I did some more study, bummed around for a while, then went to GM.

I have only lived in rented accommodation once in my life and at the time I already owned other properties, it was convenience.
Us baby boomers are only about 20% of the population yet we own more than 50% of the private assets in the country. We might have been raised on milk and honey but we are not so stupid as to not understand what our parents and grandparents were telling us about.
I'll be the first to admit some of the best financial advances I have made come down to pure dumb luck, but not all of them. Most of My hobby has been paid for by other peoples failures and my policy of running no debt.
I have Bought most of my vehicles from people who had mismanaged their own affairs, and were in forced sale situations, or alternately I have moved funds and spent overseas when the currency balance is in my favor.

I worked very hard when I was young and got into the property game before I was married or had Kids.
Now I don't have too work so hard and am enjoying myself. My Dad worked from fifteen years old until he retired at sixty five. He died aged sixty seven. There is a very important life lesson there that I didn't miss.

Cheers Kiwi



48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 01-09-17 05:31 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
2blu52 
"16th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 17677
2blu52
Age: 83
Loc: Montana
Reg: 03-12-02
01-09-17 06:16 PM - Post#2670350    
    In response to rrausch

MY wife's dad was one of the unfortunate ones that lost the farm in the early 30s.He had to work as a farm laborer for several years before being able to land a job with the railroad.

"PEACE IS THAT GLORIUS MOMENT IN HISTORY WHEN EVERY ONE STANDS AROUND RELOADING"

THOMAS JEFFERSON


 
Cruzin Okie 
Contributor
Posts: 621
Cruzin Okie
Loc: Jay, Oklahoma
Reg: 10-26-11
01-09-17 07:38 PM - Post#2670365    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

Kiwi, I really don't know where I was conceived, I was really young then!! Matter of fact it was such a shock to me to be born I didn't talk for about a year and a half.

Johnnie

1950 styleline deluxe sports coupe, 350 cid, TH 400, nova rear end. Gen IV Vintage air. SOLD!
1953 210 4 Door, 235 with Powerglide. All original except for the 1954 hood bird.

John 3:16



 
rrausch 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 13126
rrausch
Loc: L.A, Cal. & St. Louis...
Reg: 04-07-03
01-09-17 10:07 PM - Post#2670390    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

  • Bel Air kiwi Said:
Hi Robert, Jeez you must be old!! LOL My parents were born in 1929 and 1931 so they were babies of the great depression......... Cheers Kiwi



Lets put it this way, when I was a kid we had no running water and we had an out house and we thought that was completely normal. My pop farmed with horses and that was normal too. I remember following my mom around the back yard when I was about 3... she'd have a hatchet in her hand trying to catch a chicken and when she caught one she'd whack it's head off with the hatchet. They really do run around wildly afterwards with no head. Now part of this little history is because I grew up in the Ozarks and that area was ALWAYS 10-20 years behind other States because roads were very bad then. But I am older than you Kiwi, so from now on you need to show respect to your elders! True!


1953 210 Convertible, 261 with dual Carter YF 966S carbs, P.S., Remote Bendix P.B. Booster... shade-tree restoration about done.




 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-10-17 04:15 AM - Post#2670404    
    In response to rrausch

Hi Robert, you must sort of fit across the generations from me a bit. My dad was one of twelve and the son of a blacksmith, their house had power but the toilet was out in a shed out the back yard. They had chickens and a big veggie gardens. Dad was the oldest, so he Granny and Grand dad used to get around in an old Harley sidecar unit. Their house was not that big and only had four bedrooms, with all those kids there was a boys room the girls room and the nursery. Granny always did laundry in a copper tub with a fire underneath out in the shed by the toilet and cooked inside on an old cast iron range. They had running water but only heated water from the range. Being early in the cue on bath night was a big plus as eight to ten kids on one tank of hot water meant plenty of recycling. I don't think they got an electric cooker until about 1965. Grannie still did all her baking in the old range and in winter it would burn all day and night for months on end. They even had a big clothes rack that lowered from the ceiling down in front of the fire for days when it rained and washing wouldn't dry.
Grand dad used to hunt and during the depression and during the WW2 all of their meat was Venison, wild boar, goat, rabbit. and ducks.
Dad used to go out with him when he was about 10. Granddad only ever had a Winchester lever action. I think it was a 44 and was older than him. I think it was 1895 or something. Dad had a 22 single shot. He said when he was learning his dad would clip him round the ear if he ever missed. Probably exaggerating, but you had to pay for ammo so I wouldn't be surprised.
When I was a kid dad borrowed a slug (pellet) gun and showed me how to shoot tins. I thought I was pretty good until he stood up some matchsticks in the dirt at the same distance as the tins and shot them all down one after the other.
Later on they would go out with one of my uncles tagging along but that was all that would fit the old Harley.
If they had a good day hunting dad would get on his pushbike afterwards and take a couple of rabbits 10 miles up the road to his grandmothers, mow the lawn by hand, and ride home after.

Different times eh.

Cheers Kiwi



48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


Edited by Bel Air kiwi on 01-10-17 04:24 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
rrausch 
"13th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 13126
rrausch
Loc: L.A, Cal. & St. Louis...
Reg: 04-07-03
01-10-17 09:29 AM - Post#2670436    
    In response to Bel Air kiwi

Different times indeed Kiwi. I brought home plenty of bunnies and squirrels for the dinner table when I was a boy. I hunted with a single shot .22--you had ONE chance, and if you missed some days that meant there'd be no meat on the table for dinner. If people knew how good red squirrels tasted there wouldn't be so many of them around. I'd clean 'em out beside our smokehouse and my mom would take a pair of bunnies or squirrel, lay them into a roasting pan, throw in some carrots and potatoes, add water and put a layer of home made biscuits on top. Squirrel pot pie!!

1953 210 Convertible, 261 with dual Carter YF 966S carbs, P.S., Remote Bendix P.B. Booster... shade-tree restoration about done.




 
Bel Air kiwi 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2493
Bel Air kiwi
Loc: New Zealand
Reg: 04-24-14
01-10-17 11:05 PM - Post#2670537    
    In response to rrausch

Hi Robert, bet there weren't any leftovers. Meat tasted like meat back then. We have farmed venison here now and it tastes different because it is paddock fed on grass not bush foraging.
My Dad used to do a lot of conservation work in his holidays and weekends so he would often walk miles culling feral livestock off small islands so they could be restored to pre settlement conditions to save rare wildlife with very limited habitat.
So we had wild beef and lamb, and its not the same either. Far richer flavor.
These islands had to be cleared of mice, rats, ferret,stoats, weasels, rabbits, hedgehogs, possums, and goats plus any feral stock animals.
Deer were pretty much mainland only and most of those were culled for venison but latter live captured from Helicopters to begin the farming industry. Canadian Moose were even released in Fiordland but didn't prosper.

There aren't any growth hormones or antibiotics in wild game.

Cheers Kiwi


48 3100 RHD, 51 Deluxe 4DR RHD, 51 Bel Air parts car, 52 Bel Air P-Glide LHD. Others 23T, 32 Tudor, 58 Edsel pacer 4DR HDT, 79 F250 351C RHD. 69,70,82 Capri. No mobile, no TV, and no Jap cars


 

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