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Username Post: electrlock info        (Topic#209339)
29chevrolet 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 37

Reg: 01-08-09
02-10-09 03:57 PM - Post#1627136    

I have written a complete and detailed article on the rebuild of a 29-32 electrlock switch assy if anyone is interested. Tried to submit it to the G.D but was told it was too wordy. I describe the breakdown in childlike terms and details so it can be understood and is the way I would prefer to see it.



 
David Hayward 
Deceased RIP David
Posts: 7051
David Hayward
Age: 63
Loc: New Forest, UK
Reg: 04-10-99
02-11-09 12:42 AM - Post#1627545    
    In response to 29chevrolet

If you want to place it here on CT I can make it sticky.

Automotive Historian, Writer & Author

Avatar: sole surviving 1939 Chevrolet truck assembled in Southampton, England


 
29chevrolet 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 37

Reg: 01-08-09
02-11-09 03:13 PM - Post#1627969    
    In response to David Hayward

Sent it to your e-mail address, let me know that you got it and if any questions



 
David Hayward 
Deceased RIP David
Posts: 7051
David Hayward
Age: 63
Loc: New Forest, UK
Reg: 04-10-99
02-12-09 12:42 PM - Post#1628562    
    In response to 29chevrolet

  • Quote:
I am writing this article to try and give a step by step assembly procedure for the 29-32 electrolock system. I hope to give greater detail and a broader explanation to simplify or clarify the information I have read in the past. I have included here a piece by piece diagram showing the intended parts that are used in this system and their respective places. Also have tried to identify part # on any of the items I have shown but unfortunately do not have all the #s as my parts book is vague at best.

I will begin this explanation starting at the dist. end of the system and am assuming that the dist. cap has already been removed, if not than do so now. Also I should note that I am particularly referencing my particular dist which is used 29-31 model year but shows a different part # for 32 but would assume that for this explanation everything will coincide. If your intention is to remove the electrolock from your dist. than the first step is to loosen the two small slotted head screws that that hold the clips that are used to attach the cap onto main body. Next completely remove the third and last small screw that passes thru the dist. housing and is fastened to the contact plate inside the dist. allowing the contact plate to slightly swivel downward on the contact end of the dist. body.

This is prob only a necessary procedure if you have the correct original 11/32 nut that was used in this system and has not been updated with a 10/32 hex nut. I would not recommend using this 10/32 hex nut myself as it may lead to the connections inside the dist. housing becoming loose. The original nut which is longer than it is wide cannot become loose when in place as the contact plate just below it will not allow it to spin and I do believe this was the thinking of the engineers that designed this system with this peculiar looking nut.

I would also add here that I would recommend that when this nut is tightened in its final position that the curvature of its face ( which is explained in greater detail below ) is in line with the form of the dist. housing body so there is no chance of this nut coming into contact with point plate and shorting out the system.

After loosening the contact plate a simple 11/32 wrench can be use to remove the first nut which I have shown as part # 828429. Be careful to give some support or at least be aware that once this nut is removed the entire system is essentially free and there are many miniature parts that you will not want to lose.

Behind this initial nut is your contact point which at this time may be removed from your contact plate by simply lifting up and off from the stationary pin and swivel point from your contact plate.

Behind your contact plate will be another part (# 827690) that is identical in every way to the initial nut first nut you just removed except that this has no threads, it simply slips onto an off of terminal stud (part # 1835071 ) Its purpose is to simply ensure a good electrical contact between the terminal stud and the points and then the first nut we removed.

I would like to add that both the first nut removed and this identical thread less nut have a slight curvature that matches the curvature of the inside of dist. housing. Also if you are in need of replacement these would be simple enough to fabricate and their dimensions are approx 1/2 in length by 3/8 width. These as all my measurements are only approx as shown to me by a simple ruler but for some of the parts measured and certainly these in particular are not to critical to the operation of the system as long as these pieces do not come in contact with any other object in the system that is conducive to electricity including but not limited to the dist housing.

Next in line is a small rigid square paper insulator that is approx 5/8 by 5/8 in size Part # 827688. As can be seen in the picture a small portion of one end has been folded over and am assuming this is to keep the metal spacer already mentioned ( part # 827690 ) from spinning as you are inserting the contact points.

Next in line is another paper washer (part # 820991) this one being of a rectangular shape and measuring approx. 1 1/2 long by 7/16 wide. This insulator insures that the contact point body itself does not come in contact with the dist. housing. It will be quickly observed that the longer end of the paper ( if referencing the hole in the paper ) is toward the rear of dist. housing.

This concludes all the necessary items inside the dist. housing itself. next we will discuss just the outside or other side of the dist. housing still keeping in line with our order.

Next there is a large lock washer ( part # 802763 ) with an outside diam. just short of 5/8 inch and an inside diam. of just short of 7/16 inch. I have read that this lock washer is often left out or replaced with a thin star lock washer because although its total thickness is only 1/16 inch it is still difficult at best to get entire assembly together as the main terminal stud protruding from electrolock housing that goes directly into the dist. housing just does not seem long enough to make things easy. I personally would not recommend leaving this washer out entirely and although a thinner star lock washer will make your life easier it is not completely impossible to put it together with the washer originally used as this is the washer I use on my system.

Next in line is the terminal cup (part # 827687 ) If missing this cup can be easily fabricated with a small lathe, its approx dimensions are 7/8 across the face by 3/4 in approx length or height. It has a small hole on the very end approx 3/8 in diam. that the terminal stud passes thru and should also be noted at this time that there is a small tang on the same end that lines up with a small hole on dist. body and keep cup from ever rotating. There is also another small hole on the outside perimeter of cup for the condenser wire to pass up thru.

The first part inside of this cup is a small Bakelite terminal (part # 827689 ) with an outside diam. of 3/8 inch and this part works in sequence with another larger Bakelite washer ( part # 827735 or # 827688, I have feeling it is 827688 because that # is in sequential order of the smaller washer prev. mentioned ) with an outside diameter of approx 3/4 inch and an inside of again 3/8 inch. Notice that the small Bakelite terminal ( # 827689 ) has an outside diam. that matches the outside diam. of terminal cup small hole on the end and that the inside diam. of large washer (# 827688 ) matches also the outside diam of these two part. The small washer fits into the small hole on the end of cup and the large washer fits over the very end of smaller washer so as you can hopefully imagine the three pieces really fit together well. These two Bakelite washers keep the terminal stud from coming in contact with any part of the terminal cup. I would also venture to say that these two Bakelite washers could easily be reproduced from any # of non conductive material.

Next in line is an ordinary thin steel washer (part # 827736 ) Outside diam. of approx 9/16 and inside diameter of approx 3/16. Notice that the outside diameter is purposely smaller than terminal cup which has an inside diameter of approx 3/4 inch. and that is again purposeful to keep any current conducted thru terminal stud away from wall of inside cup. The inside diam. of this washer gives you an approx outside diam. of terminal stud at this particular point of stud.
Following that will be your condenser terminal (condenser part # of 826947 ) The eyelet of condenser terminal passes thru as previously mentioned the bottom of terminal cup and onto or thru the terminal stud. One problem I did notice was finding a condenser with the eyelet that did not have to be specially ordered. I personally recommend only using this type of eyelet as any other slip on open ended type may slip off without your knowing it and come in contact with inner cup wall. I would also recommend that the condenser wire at least just short of the eyelet be covered in some heavy insulating material so there is no chance of vibration allowing the cup to cut thru the thin insulation that is on the wire.

Next piece that my parts book does not given definitive part # for is a # 10 small steel lock washer, I have not determined its purpose as I have experimented with and without and it seems to make no difference. I do and would recommend having it there as it was originally put there with a purpose that is just at this point not clear to me.

Next in line is another paper washer ( # 827734 ) It has an approx outside diameter of 3/4 inch and an inside approx diameter of 3/16 ( which matches the outside diam. of terminal stud ) Notice there are 3 half moon cut-outs, these are simply there so that the washer will slightly open up and slip onto and stay onto the slightly stepped up portion of terminal stud. More of convenience thing in my opinion to keep washer where you want it to stay as you are fiddling with everything else.

Next is the electroshock terminal end I have shown a picture of this end with the stud protruding thru. First on end and screwed into end is a brass threaded retainer (# 827598 ) this part has an approx measurement of 5/8 outside and 3-8 inside. Thickness is just short of 1/8.
Behind that retainer is another Bakelite washer ( # 827606 or 827735 ) which fits into the end of what I would best describe as a terminal stud insulation bushing shown in my parts book as ( if I am even correct on the description ) 1841968. My parts book is vague from here on down the line so I will guess as far as I can and then stop guessing when I have no idea. Everything behind the small brass retainer that I have mentioned above is inside of the electric housing end and if you keep that in mind it will hopefully help you to better understand how these parts go together. The terminal stud insulation bushing in other words has an inside lip that the Bakelite washer sits into in simpler terms.

Inside of the terminal insulation bushing and protruding thru the Bakelite washer and the brass threaded retainer is the often mentioned terminal stud (# 1835071 ) The terminal stud has two washers secured on its outer end as shown in the picture first being a steel washer (# 817306 ) and then holding that on is a small copper snap ring.

In front of the terminal stud is a small spring that has an uncompressed height of approx 3/8 inch. and that comes in contact with a miniature copper washer onto which the single wire that travels the length of corrugated tubing from your ignition assy is connected by solder.
Keep in mind that within this terminal stud insulation bushing there are five pieces, a small copper washer that your wire is soldered onto, the spring ( that I failed to mention will normally have a very tiny copper strand woven among its length to help conduct the power ) the terminal stud with its two small wire attached at its end by the small copper snap ring. all these parts are compressed and held into place by first the small Bakelite washer and then the brass threaded retainer holds all of this into the end housing.

I know this may all seem alot but once you experience it for yourself you will see just how simple all of this is. I have only had mine apart twice and the second time was just to take pictures of what I am referring to. I could do this almost blindfolded now and you will be able to also if you only study my diagrams, read my text and get your hands dirty. Next I will explain the ignition end but first I will quickly mention that the corrugated tubing is actually only a theft deterrent against the much smaller and thinner corrugated tubing inside. As mentioned this tubing holds one single 16 gauge wire.

Referring to my pictures I have tried to show you the few parts that make up the other end of the system. As can be seen in the picture there is a lock ring that is pinched around two opposing ends, to remove the lock ring simply turn it halfway and it will pull straight back off of the cylinder housing assembly which is also pinched onto the end piece from the corrugated steel sheathing.

I recommend working very carefully around this area as the square Bakelite looking terminal coming out of both sides of the cylinder housing is indeed Bakelite and because of its age can be very fragile so what I did myself was to remove the ignition cylinder by removing assembly from dash ( also assuming you have battery already disconnected ) and also remove the wire ( 29 ) or wires ( 30 + ) Put key in ignition and turn so that cylinder pops out and there you will see exposed partially around one point of the circumference of outer lock cylinder housing a small button that you depress and at that point the lock cylinder should just pull out. Again be careful that nothing else comes out that you do not notice, not much in there and I have again shown all that is in there in the order of how it comes out.

When it comes to reassembly follow the operation B portion of the printout I have given and you will be fine, not much here to be screwed up but just make sure that the small metal washer that the spring sits on inside of the lock cylinder housing is sitting on top of the dimples on the inside of cylinder housing and not on top of the terminal contacts or the system will be shorted out.

To replace the wire that runs in the center of sheathing I personally drilled out the three spot welds that held the collar onto the lock cylinder housing and that allowed me to have much greater access to the removal of the Bakelite terminal that the wire is soldered onto. Just heat up the solder that holds the wire in place on the opposite end of the terminal where your single coil wire connects and pull the wire through and out.

Again I hope that I have explained all that is involved with this system clearly and I more importantly hope that I have not given so much information so that I confuse anybody into not wanting to tackle the job for themselves, as mentioned it is all an easy process that anyone can master once you get past the fact there are quite a few small parts.





Automotive Historian, Writer & Author

Avatar: sole surviving 1939 Chevrolet truck assembled in Southampton, England


Edited by David Hayward on 10-16-11 01:58 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
29chevrolet 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 37

Reg: 01-08-09
02-12-09 12:53 PM - Post#1628567    
    In response to David Hayward

Fantastic, that is what this hobby is supposed to be all about and I hope that I have helped someone by writing this and thank-you for the opportunity to have it shown here.



Edited by David Hayward on 02-12-09 01:04 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
buggymangp 
Contributor
Posts: 210

Reg: 08-26-08
02-12-09 01:26 PM - Post#1628578    
    In response to 29chevrolet

i can`t thank you enough for the infor.
thats just what i was looking for, part #`s and a clear unstanding of what goes on in there.
thanks again.
i printed out the infor. and the picture.




 
29chevrolet 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 37

Reg: 01-08-09
02-12-09 02:32 PM - Post#1628597    
    In response to buggymangp

I cant thank-you enough for letting me know that it is appreciated and I hope to hear from others as well. I spent a great deal of time studying the details of this system and would like to answer any more questions anyone might have and can provide addit pict. of the system that I have taken but did not submit here yet.



 
buggymangp 
Contributor
Posts: 210

Reg: 08-26-08
02-12-09 02:40 PM - Post#1628603    
    In response to 29chevrolet

29 chevy
BTW. i have a 30 coach and when i pulled the engine i didn`t disconnect the lock from the dis. out of fear i wouldn`t know how it went back together.




 
29chevrolet 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 37

Reg: 01-08-09
02-12-09 03:17 PM - Post#1628639    
    In response to buggymangp

My 29 did not have most of the system, only bits and pieces but I have a 30 coach parts car that had entire system but 29 has single wire and your 30 has 3? maybe 2 cant remember but otherwise identical 29-32 otherwise, anyway I used parts from both to build my 29 and now it is just as it was new, I was lucky to have all the parts between the two that I did not have to fabricate anything



 
ESSX28 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 1

Reg: 10-15-11
10-15-11 10:12 PM - Post#2147707    
    In response to David Hayward

Where can I find the photos? The "link to the image" doesn't work on my comp!!
Thanks for the great Electrolock restore description
I've got a pdf from Electrolock with detailed instructions & diagrams covering Types 5A, 5B, 8A, 8B, 9A, 9B, 12A, 15S if anyone wants a copy.

Dave Y (New Zealand)



Edited by ESSX28 on 10-15-11 10:22 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
nmarinelab 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 1

Reg: 08-02-13
08-02-13 10:30 AM - Post#2368568    
    In response to ESSX28

Hi - We have read the forum about how to rebuild the electrolok switch and my dad is still having problems. Your post says you had a pdf with diagrams. Can I please get a copy so that my father can finish his project. He has been working on this issue for a very long time.

If anyone can help I would appreciate it!



 
eldredjames 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 7
eldredjames
Reg: 06-23-13
09-25-13 01:16 PM - Post#2385304    
    In response to nmarinelab

I need the diagram too! Please!!!!!

Jim



 
popdesigner 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 1
popdesigner
Reg: 06-19-14
06-19-14 09:04 AM - Post#2462741    
    In response to 29chevrolet



Good morning! I have an Electrolock I'm struggling with, and I found your great article! I was wondering if there was an accompanying diagram or pictures?





 
Bare Feet 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 2

Loc: Upstate NY
Reg: 12-04-15
12-16-15 06:25 PM - Post#2595985    
    In response to popdesigner

I'm missing the part that fastens to the distributor. A picture or diagram would help.
I have a 29 Coupe.



 
ronsengines 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 1

Reg: 06-16-16
07-18-16 08:03 AM - Post#2640379    
    In response to ESSX28

hey Dave . your post says u have a pdf with diagrams . can i please get a copy.



 
Keith_Knox 
Moderator and "16th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 5951
Keith_Knox
Age: 77
Loc: Napa, Ca USA
Reg: 04-02-00
07-18-16 08:15 AM - Post#2640381    
    In response to ronsengines

David Hayward passed away several years ago. I cannot access the file that shows what year it was.

1948 Chevy Fleetmaster Coupe Purchased 6/2010. Stock with rebuilt 52 216 installed May 1966.
1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup, stock. Purchased 11/18/17.
1962 Ranchero Purchased 4/2017 221 V8 Automatic.
2013 F150 Crew Cab


 
Ray P W 
Contributor
Posts: 364

Reg: 09-30-15
07-18-16 08:34 AM - Post#2640387    
    In response to 29chevrolet

29 Chev,

It is not at all surprising that VCCA rejected your article. I was a VCCA member for over 40 years, ending in 2009, and watched it change. What was once an organization with many do-it-yourself members it morphed into a gentleman's club. That reflected the shift in the car hobby from guys doing their own restorations and hot rod building to affluent "collectors" buying completed restorations and/or street rods as "investments".

The VCCA monthly magazine is like a travel brochure now with articles of quaint "tours", restaurants and motels. Gone are the hard core articles like how to convert poured bearing engines to insert bearings and how to put 50's era gears in 30's era transmissions.

There ares still guys who value what you wrote but it's probably mostly us gray heads. It would be really nice if there were a forum of like minded people who still enjoy the creative process and ignore the "experts" standing on the sidelines saying this or that can't be done.

Here's my example of what I'm talking about:

http://vcca.org/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/334876...

Ray W



 
Keith_Knox 
Moderator and "16th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 5951
Keith_Knox
Age: 77
Loc: Napa, Ca USA
Reg: 04-02-00
07-18-16 08:38 AM - Post#2640390    
    In response to Keith_Knox

Found the info.

Writer, Author, Journalist
David Hayward passed in early 2012

That is when Tony asked me to become the moderator for the 42-48 forum. A couple of years later I took over the 29-41 forum.


1948 Chevy Fleetmaster Coupe Purchased 6/2010. Stock with rebuilt 52 216 installed May 1966.
1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup, stock. Purchased 11/18/17.
1962 Ranchero Purchased 4/2017 221 V8 Automatic.
2013 F150 Crew Cab


 
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