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Username Post: Ignition coil testing        (Topic#208625)
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 02:34 AM - Post#1620190    

Just how important are the factory specs on resistance in a coil. It's from an '89 Dakota pickup with a 3.9L V-6 Coil is the factory one, probably original. It's the regular kind of coil attached to the firewall, not a coil pack like later years.


Chiltons manual says:

Primary winding should be between .95 to 1.20 ohms
This coil I have tests out at 1.9 to 2.0

Secondary winding should be between 11,300 and 15,300 ohms
This coil I have tests out at 10,600 to 11,000
(I brought the coil inside to warm it up and that gave me the two different readings I showed as it cooled off from about 100 degrees down to room temp)


There is no spark at all to the plug wires and no detectable spark from the coil tower wire then we crank the engine and hold the coil lead near a good ground.

I got a call to see if I could help get this engine running again. It ran OK a couple weeks ago, but just wouldn't start one day.
The spark plugs wires cap and rotor have all replaced. and we can hear the fuel pump in the tank pump up to pressure when the ignition is turned on. Fuel filter has been replaced also.

This pickup has TBI and electronic ignition.

My big question is the coil. After reading the ohm numbers I showed up above, do you think this coil could be the culprit?
If not, what else would cause no spark?
When the key is on, there is voltage to the coil.

I don't want to just randomly start replacing parts one at a time till we get this figured out.

It's a Dodge, but I trust you guys more than anyone.

Thanks in advance for any input on why this engine won't start anymore.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


Edited by ranman on 02-01-09 02:47 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
aghaga 
"4th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 1772

Age: 60
Loc: Altavista, Va.
Reg: 07-05-08
02-01-09 04:55 PM - Post#1620614    
    In response to ranman

I'd lay money on the electronic modual. Seems like I remember that yours is located on the driver's side wheel well.

 
acardon 
Senior Member
Posts: 9868
acardon
Loc: DFW TEXAS
Reg: 03-25-05
02-01-09 05:52 PM - Post#1620651    
    In response to ranman

Unless you have a high quality ohm meter, I don't think the readings are off enough to cause a problem. Your meter can be off that much, especially with weak batteries.
Is the distributor turning? Sounds dumb, but it bit me once.
Don
66 Corvair (driving)
57 2dr HT (driving)
56 2dr HT (waiting to be restored)


 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 06:56 PM - Post#1620697    
    In response to aghaga

  • aghaga Said:
I'd lay money on the electronic modual. Seems like I remember that yours is located on the driver's side wheel well.


I don't recall anything on the drivers side, but could be wrong.
On the passenger inner fender there is a large plastic box with a 14 pin connector going into it and it also has an air pipe connecting to the air cleaner snorkle.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 07:09 PM - Post#1620707    
    In response to acardon

  • acardon Said:
Unless you have a high quality ohm meter, I don't think the readings are off enough to cause a problem. Your meter can be off that much, especially with weak batteries.
Is the distributor turning? Sounds dumb, but it bit me once.



Nearly identcal readings from both an EQUUS and a Sperry multi-meter.

I didn't check to see if the distributor is moving. I'm assuming it is......... For the price of admission here, I'll take any advice I can..... including stuff like that. Tho it would be rare, it's something I would never have thought of.

I pulled the coil wire and held it close to a good ground and had her crank the engine over....... no spark at all with that test.

I appreciate anything you guys can offer.

Do these have a ballast resistor? The Chiltons manual doesn't address this, nor even mention it has one, but a NAPA parts guy told me it does.
The truck is 20 miles away, so I just want to be prepared when I go up to try and fix it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
52chevybob 
Dedicated Enthusiast
Posts: 5628

Reg: 05-27-08
02-01-09 07:24 PM - Post#1620714    
    In response to ranman

When measuring low resistances like this, you measure the shorted leads first to find out what the 0 error is and then put the part between them and take that reading, subtracting the 0 error. It is also quite important to get a good contact to insure that there is little resistance in the contact.
I'd more look to putting 12V on the primary and quickly letting it go. You wantt o have a spark plug hooked up to the HV and to ground to see if the spark occurs. You should get a good fat blue spark.
I too would more suspect the erectronics here since you measured resistance in both coils.

 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 08:01 PM - Post#1620735    
    In response to 52chevybob

  • 52chevybob Said:
When measuring low resistances like this, you measure the shorted leads first to find out what the 0 error is and then put the part between them and take that reading, subtracting the 0 error. It is also quite important to get a good contact to insure that there is little resistance in the contact.
I'd more look to putting 12V on the primary and quickly letting it go. You wantt o have a spark plug hooked up to the HV and to ground to see if the spark occurs. You should get a good fat blue spark.
I too would more suspect the erectronics here since you measured resistance in both coils.


I'm not following.... shorted leads first?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
gchemist 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator
Posts: 21985
gchemist
Loc: Austin, TX 78748
Reg: 05-09-00
02-01-09 08:56 PM - Post#1620784    
    In response to ranman

F#$D's have ignition modules on the driver side fender.

Does the external coil have power to it? I remember replacing my 91 Dakota coil a couple of times.
'83 Silverardo XST - ZZ4 powered
'96 GMC Jimmy LS Ret. @236651 miles


 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 09:12 PM - Post#1620797    
    In response to gchemist

  • gchemist Said:
F#$D's have ignition modules on the driver side fender.

Does the external coil have power to it? I remember replacing my 91 Dakota coil a couple of times.


I recall using a volt meter on one of the leads of the coil and the battery and getting voltage.
The truck is 20 miles away and I have the coil here with me. There aren't any auto parts place in that little community where the truck is, so any trip I make with parts that don't fix it will be a waste of money, so I'm just looking for ideas here.... the more the merrier.

I guess I'm trying to rule the coil as either working or not working. If I need to do more checks when I go back up there, probably tomorrow.

This has some kind of electronic distributor in it, and I'm wondering if the auto parts guy was correct about it having a ballast resistor. He said it did and are a common problem.
................ I have the manual.......... I'm gonna see how detailed the electrical pages are. It must have some diagrams. I'll check to see if I can find a resistor in there............... I shoulda looked earlier. I've just been looking in the electrical diagnosis pages so far.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 09:25 PM - Post#1620808    
    In response to ranman

I don't see a ballast resistor in the electrical section............. dang, the print is so tiny I need a magnifying loupe to read it. Sheesh, why do they do that?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
IgnitionMan 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2713

Reg: 04-15-05
02-01-09 10:31 PM - Post#1620839    
    In response to ranman

ranman, no resistor in the circuit, most later model MOPAR have just about everything in the control box, from electronic ignition and EFI, to the regulator for the alternator.

Resistance checks are no longer the way to test these components, taking them off the vehicle and running them on a load tester machine IS. Load testing machines can be found at places like Auto Zone stores. Let the components run for a while, some flaws might take a bit of time to show up.

Some of these components will show a very short instant reading on an ohm meter, but then, turn off, not allowing you to see the reading, it happens that fast from reading to blank screen.

Load test, that should separate the good parts from the dead ones.

 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
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ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 10:44 PM - Post#1620842    
    In response to IgnitionMan

Thanks I-man. I'll see if out little town is that high tech. I asked the guys at NAPA questions about the ohm readings I got on the coil, and they didn't mention load testing................. I'm guessing two things:
#1 they don't have a load tester
#2 They have a coil in stock ...for $47.00


For the sake of arguement.
Could the ohm readings I posted above still cause the 100% no spark condition we experienced? I figured if it was a little bit outside of specs, we would see at least some spark.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-01-09 10:50 PM - Post#1620848    
    In response to IgnitionMan

  • IgnitionMan Said:
ranman, no resistor in the circuit, most later model MOPAR have just about everything in the control box, from electronic ignition and EFI, to the regulator for the alternator.....................



1989 is late model? You're makin' me feel really old, bucko!
Probably don't make a difference, but coil has 2 sets of numbers on it.

4379009, and below it in larger numbers 4176009
Mopar / Japan


I know these Dakota's were not the best things Dodge ever created. That said, are there any parts of their ignition systems that are known trouble makers? You know, weak spots in design.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


Edited by ranman on 02-01-09 10:56 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
gchemist 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator
Posts: 21985
gchemist
Loc: Austin, TX 78748
Reg: 05-09-00
02-02-09 04:29 AM - Post#1620884    
    In response to ranman

I don't have my factory Dakota manuals. They went with the truck. I loved that little Dakota. I bought new off the lot with 331 miles on it. No one wanted it because it was a long bed. I bought it. I put over 215000 miles before retiring it. I had only three major problems. Two were fixed by the dealer: tranny rebuild at 32000 miles and one distributor/computer short at 169990 miles. Barely made it under warranty!! The last item was rocker arm ticking and noise. I installed new rocker arm shafts, rockers and push rods. The truck is still running, 225000+ miles. My folks are about to sell it.

I rarely heard of any ignition faults. Tranny problems were common on OD units. Can you pull any codes?
'83 Silverardo XST - ZZ4 powered
'96 GMC Jimmy LS Ret. @236651 miles


 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
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ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
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02-02-09 11:10 AM - Post#1621045    
    In response to gchemist

  • gchemist Said:
I don't have my factory Dakota manuals. They went with the truck. I loved that little Dakota. I bought new off the lot with 331 miles on it. No one wanted it because it was a long bed. I bought it. I put over 215000 miles before retiring it. I had only three major problems. Two were fixed by the dealer: tranny rebuild at 32000 miles and one distributor/computer short at 169990 miles. Barely made it under warranty!! The last item was rocker arm ticking and noise. I installed new rocker arm shafts, rockers and push rods. The truck is still running, 225000+ miles. My folks are about to sell it.

I rarely heard of any ignition faults. Tranny problems were common on OD units. Can you pull any codes?




I don't know if it can pull codes or not. I'll check when I go back up this afternoon.
Local automotive electrical shop says it can test the coil...... not sure how high tech the method, but if the coil sparks, we know we have to look deeper. Testing the crank trigger was mentioned by the guy I talked to.

I sure love good old points and condensers. hee hee!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
Stinky 
Senior Member
Posts: 1223

Loc: Whitewater, CO
Reg: 05-25-01
02-02-09 01:33 PM - Post#1621109    
    In response to ranman

Do you have another coil laying around? A points coil will work...most any coil will work. BTW, I 2nd the module idea. I'm not familiar w/the Dakotas. But, the older full sized Dodge Pu's used to have a resistor on the firewall, about in the center. Chevy HEIs don't have one, and need a full 12V. I ASSUME, the if you are getting voltage, that it is getting the correct ammount. It is either getting 12+ V, or 6+ V, or not. I would also assume that when a resister fails, that the voltage goes to zero, and not up. I also assume that it would run on low voltage, just poorly. If you have doubts, you can use a jumper wire...for a very short time. You'll fry a 6V system on 12V, but it will take awhile.

I tend to disregard the coil. On an HEI, the first thing to do is change the module.

Personally, I've never seen a coil go bad, not that I am a big ignition guru...but I have heard of it happening.

I had a 2.8 that lost spark. I don't remember how long it took me to find this out, but the timing gear (which was fiber, and prone to this) broke and the cam stopped turning.

 
raycow 
Honored Member
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Age: 71
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Reg: 11-26-02
02-02-09 03:37 PM - Post#1621153    
    In response to ranman

The one ohms test you didn't do is from each terminal to the coil case. You want to see an open circuit there, that is, infinite ohms. A proper coil tester will apply high voltage between the terminals and case, because that is a better way to detect insulation fauilure.

That said, it is really unusual for a coil to go bad. The only failures I have ever seen were on points systems where the owner left the switch on with the engine not running and the points closed.

Ray
Bacon is the gateway drug for vegetarians - Bridget Lancaster


 
gchemist 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator
Posts: 21985
gchemist
Loc: Austin, TX 78748
Reg: 05-09-00
02-02-09 05:53 PM - Post#1621272    
    In response to raycow

Pickup coil failures are notorious for being hard to find. You nornally exhaust all other possibilities.

The codes should be easy to pull. Turn the key on-off-on-off-on. Leave the key in on position. It will flash any stored codes. Dodge trucks up 95 used the ignition key procedure to extract codes without a scanner. 96 and later have ODBII.
'83 Silverardo XST - ZZ4 powered
'96 GMC Jimmy LS Ret. @236651 miles


Edited by gchemist on 02-02-09 08:52 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
IgnitionMan 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2713

Reg: 04-15-05
02-02-09 06:54 PM - Post#1621344    
    In response to gchemist

Non-V-8/V-6 Dakota, it's a Mitsubishi. Some very early Dakota's, even though they aren't I-4, had Mitsubishi electronics on them.

I'd pull the parts and find a store that has a tester, just to eliminate them as the problem(s).

On the codes, MOPAR might be different, but, GM check engine light will flash a code 12, trhree times, then, any and all other codes it has stored, then, code 12 three more times, then start the rest again, until the key is turned off again.

MOPAR codes I have no idea as to reading without a dealer computer.

To access the GM codes, there is an assembly line diagnostic link (ALDL) under the dash, with A-B-C-D, etc lettering on it. A simple paper clip bent to connect A-B or A-D will get the computer to spit the codes out. If there is an A-B pair of terminals, there won't be a terminal in D, and vice-versa. To read the codes, connect A-B or A-D, turn key to the ON position, DO NOT START ENGINE, wait for codes to flash. The number of flashes will be the code, code 12 will be one flash, then a small wait, then two flashes. 44, four flashes, then a small wait, then 4 flashes, etc. Code 12 will always show up, it is two things, a test to show the computer ALDL is working, and since the engine isn't running, there won't be a timing signal to the computer, code 12, no timing reference signal.

 
52chevybob 
Dedicated Enthusiast
Posts: 5628

Reg: 05-27-08
02-02-09 07:40 PM - Post#1621387    
    In response to ranman

Rainman, what don't you understand???
With low resistance measuring, the error of the meter can swamp the value of the resistance. As such, you have to first fine the real value on the meter of the 0 resistance. For example, if you'r measuring a resistance of 1 ohm and the meter shows 0.3 ohms for a 0 resistance, you're going to be reading 1.3 ohms which is going to be a 30 percent error! Thus, first find the 0 of the instrument and then measure what you are interested in measuring.
FWIW, when I was working, I'd routinely measure resistances on the order of 0.01 or so ohms. Things get real hairy when trying to accurately measure values like that.

 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-02-09 10:10 PM - Post#1621496    
    In response to 52chevybob

  • 52chevybob Said:
Rainman, what don't you understand???
With low resistance measuring, the error of the meter can swamp the value of the resistance. As such, you have to first fine the real value on the meter of the 0 resistance. For example, if you'r measuring a resistance of 1 ohm and the meter shows 0.3 ohms for a 0 resistance, you're going to be reading 1.3 ohms which is going to be a 30 percent error! Thus, first find the 0 of the instrument and then measure what you are interested in measuring.
FWIW, when I was working, I'd routinely measure resistances on the order of 0.01 or so ohms. Things get real hairy when trying to accurately measure values like that.



You mean touching the two probe ends together and zeroing them in?
I thought you only did that on 50 year old meters that had a pointer needle and a zero adjustment screw?
I used two different digital meters and both read the same.


Anyhow, I took the coil to a shop and he hooked it up to some juice and a distributor in a shop vice and it made plenty of 3/4 inch long white and snappy sparks.
............. It was kinda funny... it nailed him first as he was hooking up the coil lead. After he recovered, it made healthy sparks to a ground.





I reinstalled the distributor and did a code check.
Code 12 This telld the number of key-ons since last fault or since faults were erased.


code 33: A/C clutch relay-- open or shorted condition detected in air conditioning clutch relay circuit.
(it doesn't have A/C)


Code 55: Completion of fault code display by check engine light.


So anyway, the code check didn't help much, but she didn't know the truck had that capability, so it's nice to know.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
gchemist 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator
Posts: 21985
gchemist
Loc: Austin, TX 78748
Reg: 05-09-00
02-02-09 10:20 PM - Post#1621499    
    In response to ranman

Okay, I would suspect the pickup coil has failed. I've run out of ideas without factory manuals.
'83 Silverardo XST - ZZ4 powered
'96 GMC Jimmy LS Ret. @236651 miles


 
IgnitionMan 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2713

Reg: 04-15-05
02-02-09 10:34 PM - Post#1621506    
    In response to gchemist

One thing to remember about most digital read out ohm meters is, they usually do not "zero out".

Touch both probes together and see if the reading is zero, it most likely won't be.

If you have, say, .30 ohms showing on the meter when the probes are touched together, and you read a part, and come up with 1.80 ohms, subtract the .30 ohms the meter uses as a work reading, this would give you 1.50 ohms as the true resistance value.

Please remember that most of these later model ignition coils are epoxy filled, and run nuclear hot. This can lead to layer shorting of the windings, and a real resistance change when the coil gets hot. This resistance change equates to electrical load modification for the other components in the system, as in the module. This is the key reason GM HEI modules fail, th3e coil gets hot, and changed the loading to the module, and the module has nothing of it, fails "for no apparent reason".

This alone is why load testing, and letting the part run on the tester for a while, to get the temp up, is essential to testing that coil. Resistance checks usually don't find a hot failing coil, only that when cooled off, and the layer shorting isn't prevalent, the coil APPEARS to be just fine.

Edited by IgnitionMan on 02-02-09 10:40 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-03-09 12:08 AM - Post#1621526    
    In response to IgnitionMan

  • IgnitionMan Said:
One thing to remember about most digital read out ohm meters is, they usually do not "zero out".

Touch both probes together and see if the reading is zero, it most likely won't be.

If you have, say, .30 ohms showing on the meter when the probes are touched together, and you read a part, and come up with 1.80 ohms, subtract the .30 ohms the meter uses as a work reading, this would give you 1.50 ohms as the true resistance value.

Please remember that most of these later model ignition coils are epoxy filled, and run nuclear hot. This can lead to layer shorting of the windings, and a real resistance change when the coil gets hot. This resistance change equates to electrical load modification for the other components in the system, as in the module. This is the key reason GM HEI modules fail, th3e coil gets hot, and changed the loading to the module, and the module has nothing of it, fails "for no apparent reason".

This alone is why load testing, and letting the part run on the tester for a while, to get the temp up, is essential to testing that coil. Resistance checks usually don't find a hot failing coil, only that when cooled off, and the layer shorting isn't prevalent, the coil APPEARS to be just fine.



First off, this is a 1989 coil........... just a plain old ordinary standard configuration oil filled coil like those made back in the good old days. Looks almost like the one my 73 stepside came with.

I just now checked both multimeters on the lowest scale.
Both were out in my truck and it's a little chilly tonight............ 37 degrees right now, so I'm not sure if cold batteries will change the effect of the resistance measurements.
Anyway, one meter read .3 and the other read .4 when touching the probes.
Crap, I always thought this electronic digital display stuff was flawless. Guess not.
I'll be damned............. I learned something new from you guys today. Thank you!!!


OK another observation after reinstalling this coil.
Tell me what it means if you can.

My own '73 stepside has an HEI and I have it wired with a hot lead to the coil and I use a rocker switch to "turn on" the ignition............. and then turn the key to start the engine. It acts as a small bit of theft deterrent hooked up this way, and it has been hooked up this way for at least a dozen years........... so I used this same logic to test the Dakota.
.......... Bear with me here and correct my logic in comparing these two systems.

(Reminding you the coil checked out fine)

My logic says that if I hook a volt meter from the negative side of the battery to the coil terminals, it should read 12 volts when I turn on the ignition of this Dakota to the on position.

Well, here's what happened:

When the key was turned to the on position, the meter raced up very quickly to almost 12 volts, (like one second or less), then sharply dropped to a reading of .04 volts

If we continued turning the key to the start position to crank the engine, it read the same .04 volts as we cranked it......or extremely close to that.


When turning the ignition key on, why would the voltage spike up to almost the full 12 volts, then immediately drop off to near zero when the key is switched to the on position? Is this normal?????
I figured it would stay at about 12 volts because the coil needs constant voltage.

Being that the Dakota module is not inside the distributor like my HEI........... is my thinking screwed up???
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


Edited by ranman on 02-03-09 12:17 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
ranman 
"2nd Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 10700
ranman
Loc: The cold wet and windy O...
Reg: 03-10-01
02-03-09 12:28 AM - Post#1621529    
    In response to ranman

Let me add some info I found out today.
The truck was running fine when she came home from work a few weeks ago............... the next morning, it would not start. ...........add that tid bit to whatever I have mentioned about "no spark" at the coil.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If plants ruled the world, would they regulate oxygen?


 
gchemist 
Senior Chevytalk Moderator
Posts: 21985
gchemist
Loc: Austin, TX 78748
Reg: 05-09-00
02-03-09 02:17 AM - Post#1621544    
    In response to ranman

Download this file!!!
http://www.justanswer.com/uploads/carhelpplus/2 008...

http://autorepair.about.com/library/images/bl293l i...

Testing article on coils: http://autorepair.about.com/cs/troubleshooting/l/ a...
'83 Silverardo XST - ZZ4 powered
'96 GMC Jimmy LS Ret. @236651 miles


Edited by gchemist on 02-03-09 02:27 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
52chevybob 
Dedicated Enthusiast
Posts: 5628

Reg: 05-27-08
02-04-09 12:38 AM - Post#1622259    
    In response to gchemist

Wait until you have to tell a software engineeer that the Analog to Digital converter that hte company has been using can be off by a fair bit. Even in the spec! 0 V in just wasnt' the half way reading with the converter chip.
FWIW, audou stuff really dosn't care if the boltage in or out is 0V as it is the varying voltage that is desired. Thus you can see a difference of 5 percent DC voltage error on such stuff. Does make the converter chips very cheap tho!

 
6-bangertim 
Frequent Contributor
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Age: 57
Loc: El Cajon, Calif.
Reg: 11-30-08
02-06-09 12:07 AM - Post#1623609    
    In response to ranman

Man, I'm really suprised that someone hasn't suggested checking the module first - I ALWAYS do in a no-spark situation. Connect a test light from the coil neg. terminal to ground. With key on, light should be bright. Crank engine - light should flash from bright to dim (good unit) as it turns over. If light remains bright, module is bad. Check your liberary for a factory book you can make copies from, or chat up a local MOPAR freak who is up on Dakotas to save time and aspirin. It might be worth your wile to get a tow dolly or trailer to bring the POS home with you for easier troubleshooting, as working "mobile" is always a pain for me! Good luck, let us know what you find out.

Stay warm and dry ...
Too Poor to Restore...My Nifty 150!
Proud owner of MISS NOVEMBER - 2011 Tri-Five Calender


 
nozel 
Member
Posts: 109

Reg: 05-17-03
02-07-09 05:43 PM - Post#1624781    
    In response to ranman

Dodge computers will not supply spark or fuel pump unless crank is sensed.
Cranking sensor is part of distributor module so I,d check that first...that said it may have been suggested already as the thread has many replies!.
Helped my crew chief with exact problem first he thought computer, searched every where for part, then fuel pump relay. I showed him how to test that (it wasn't the problem) so he went to Napa, bought a dizzy module, changed that and the truck was running again.


 
Stinky 
Senior Member
Posts: 1223

Loc: Whitewater, CO
Reg: 05-25-01
02-08-09 10:43 PM - Post#1625722    
    In response to nozel

6-banger, you were at least the 3rd person to recommend that.

aghaga said it in the lst reply...you silly goose and I agree w/you. I;ve heard what you said several times. On a HEI, if you ain't got no spark, change the module and you should keep a spare w/you.

 
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