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Username Post: Aluminum fuel line or steel?        (Topic#184886)
jeffs55 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11783
jeffs55
Age: 55
Loc: Shelby Forest, Tennessee
Reg: 01-05-06
03-17-08 03:10 PM - Post#1390305    

I searched this forum and couldn't find anything on this subject.
I didn't search the whole of CT, but here it is anyway.

While I'm waiting on cargo floor and spare tire well, I thought I could bide my time replacing the fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump.
Yes, there are kits you can buy, 70 bucks, and they have to bend it to ship it.
I've been looking at different places for fuel line and have some choices:

  • Aluminum
  • Galvanized steel
  • Stainless
  • Powder Coated steel


I'm not even thinking about braided lines.
Pros, cons on the above?
I can get 25' of Moroso Aluminum line for $23.40.
It's listed as 3/8 OD, so I assume it's 5/16 ID.
$28.40 for the 1/2 OD (3/8 ID?) and free shipping.
The word FREE always gets my attention.

Jegs, I think it was, has some powder coated line.
That just seems like trouble keeping it from cracking the coating and looking good.

Are there potential hazards with using aluminum lines on a street car?
Jeff
55 Handyman
66 F100 project
32 3 Window Coupe project
1996 Silverado short bed extended cab
1948 Studebaker Champion
1977 Toyota Celica Coupe
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HAL_396 
Member
Posts: 2947
HAL_396
Loc: Austin, TX
Reg: 11-16-06
03-17-08 03:23 PM - Post#1390319    
    In response to jeffs55

FWIW, I use aluminum and know several other people that have with no issues. Just don't use rubber hoses anywhere.
1955 Chevy Custom
1966 Biscayne
1966 Caprice Drag Car Inwork
1966 Caprice parts car
2004 Silverado
2007 Impala LS
2009 G5


 
396wgn 
Contributor
Posts: 107

Reg: 03-14-08
03-17-08 03:42 PM - Post#1390337    
    In response to jeffs55

do not use aluminum for fuel lines. aluminum work hardens is weak and does not have the flexibility of steel. ask your self this... ever see an aluminum fuel line from the factory?

 
jeffs55 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11783
jeffs55
Age: 55
Loc: Shelby Forest, Tennessee
Reg: 01-05-06
03-17-08 03:43 PM - Post#1390339    
    In response to HAL_396

Yeah, I'm trying to get rid of the rubber lines.
I've got a braided line from the pump to the filter/carb now.
There was rubber hose from the tank (pickup) to the main line and one from the other end of the line to the fuel pump. Just a few hose clamps away from disaster.
Jeff
55 Handyman
66 F100 project
32 3 Window Coupe project
1996 Silverado short bed extended cab
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1977 Toyota Celica Coupe
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Greatride 57 
Contributor
Posts: 170

Loc: Utah
Reg: 08-02-06
03-17-08 03:44 PM - Post#1390341    
    In response to jeffs55

Jeff, I am looking for gas line as well. Would you be so kind as to share where you are getting those prices and from who. My car will be back from the painters by the end of the month (I hope)
and I will be needing to run brake and gas lines when I get it home.
Thanks Greatride 57

 
MilesB 
Member
Posts: 1288
MilesB
Loc: Melbourne, Australia
Reg: 04-17-06
03-17-08 03:46 PM - Post#1390344    
    In response to Greatride 57

I get all mine from a local hydraulic line and hose shop. There's usually one near big industrial areas. No shipping and no bending
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Edited by MilesB on 03-17-08 03:46 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
jeffs55 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11783
jeffs55
Age: 55
Loc: Shelby Forest, Tennessee
Reg: 01-05-06
03-17-08 04:05 PM - Post#1390367    
    In response to MilesB

Big industrial areas?
Sounds like the area where I work. Hmmm, maybe the maintainance guys at work would have a suggestion on someplace.
Jeff
55 Handyman
66 F100 project
32 3 Window Coupe project
1996 Silverado short bed extended cab
1948 Studebaker Champion
1977 Toyota Celica Coupe
My Pics


 
awsum55 
Senior Member
Posts: 8838
awsum55
Age: 62
Loc: O.P. Kansas
Reg: 09-27-01
03-17-08 04:22 PM - Post#1390387    
    In response to jeffs55

Here is where I got mine. The prices seem very good and they are great about returns. Speedway Motors
Five things that you cannot recover in life:

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Fifty7 
Contributor
Posts: 121
Fifty7
Age: 39
Loc: Bakersfield
Reg: 03-10-07
03-17-08 04:30 PM - Post#1390397    
    In response to jeffs55

I've used all the above. I like and recommend stainless but the downfall is the cost. Aluminum works and is cheaper as is Gal. steel.......but it seems like I could never get the line perfectly straight after it was coiled up for delivery (Jeg's/summit ship the aluminum line this way.

I think your best bet is to do what the poster above said and find an industrial plumbing/hardware shop and buy it in straight lengths and then make the bends you need.........turns out much better this way.

JiM
'57 Chevy Belair HT
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Henrys57wagon 
Canadian Regional Coordinator &"8th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 3085
Henrys57wagon
Age: 64
Loc: Woodlawn, (Ottawa) On. Ca...
Reg: 04-15-06
03-17-08 05:22 PM - Post#1390450    
    In response to Fifty7

I buy my steel lines from my local autoparts supplier, even the rolls. If you don't want to straighten the coiled tubing then buy the longest pre-fitted lines and join them together, good day, Henry.
57 B/A wagon, 408"BB with 14' Bonair travel trailer,71 Nova 355"SB, 07 2500HD with 26 Prowler 5th wheel, 09 Impala LT, John Deere lawn tractor, MF 2610 tractor
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Big T 
"9th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 2424

Loc: Simi Valley CA
Reg: 04-14-06
03-17-08 06:16 PM - Post#1390517    
    In response to HAL_396

Hal
Why not gas rated rubber lines at each end of the hard line???
Tom

55 4 door BelAir


 
ljfen 
Valued Contributor
Posts: 2608
ljfen
Loc: Michigan
Reg: 11-04-04
03-17-08 10:50 PM - Post#1390687    
    In response to jeffs55

I used it from the back to the front with Jegs aluminum line. I had a reg plumbed in too. Don't use it on carbs. The fittings will leak. Its hard to get the flares to seal. If you overtighten you will blow thru the flare. I used compression fittings where it went into the regulator. That seemed ok but I felt a lot safer when I went to steel. The aluminum will harden over time and become brittle. I picked my steel line up at the local hydraulic shop. 20 ft lengths was nice to deal with instead of cobbling something from the local parts store.
Larry

I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever.

Thomas Jefferson


 
HYPR 
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Posts: 10407
HYPR
Age: 62
Loc: Shaking and Burning!
Reg: 07-19-01
03-18-08 12:02 AM - Post#1390701    
    In response to jeffs55

Jeff,
I run .5" braided at the tank to a single section of .5" stainless hard line along the frame rail from the rear kick up to the engine compartment then braided again to the fuel pump and from the pump to the carb with -8AN fittings at all connection points. Earle supplied the Stainless but as already stated there are several outlets for it and it can be shipped pre-flared with fittings in a long tube for cheap.
Bob
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/222599
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Ebach57 
Contributor
Posts: 619
Ebach57
Loc: Mechanicsville, MD
Reg: 02-15-05
03-18-08 02:32 AM - Post#1390713    
    In response to 396wgn

  • Quote:
do not use aluminum for fuel lines. aluminum work hardens is weak and does not have the flexibility of steel. ask your self this... ever see an aluminum fuel line from the factory?




They use it in aircraft all the time.
Paul
1957 2dr.210 Wagon 1969 C10 Pickup
Mechanicsville, Maryland

To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world.


 
HAL_396 
Member
Posts: 2947
HAL_396
Loc: Austin, TX
Reg: 11-16-06
03-18-08 03:44 AM - Post#1390734    
    In response to Big T

  • Big T Said:
Hal
Why not gas rated rubber lines at each end of the hard line???




Rubber lines dry out and crack causing leaks and are easliy damaged. I know many a fires have been started by using rubber hoses. I know you have to use them from the hardline to the fuel pump but the less rubber hoses you use the better off you will be.
1955 Chevy Custom
1966 Biscayne
1966 Caprice Drag Car Inwork
1966 Caprice parts car
2004 Silverado
2007 Impala LS
2009 G5


 
HAL_396 
Member
Posts: 2947
HAL_396
Loc: Austin, TX
Reg: 11-16-06
03-18-08 03:50 AM - Post#1390736    
    In response to Ebach57




They use it in aircraft all the time.



Yes we do but the aircraft ones shouldn't be compared to what jegs & summit sells. The aircraft ones are probably T-6 6061 heat treated while who knows what those guys sell. But I still think there stuff is good enough for automotive use or else I wouldn't use it.
1955 Chevy Custom
1966 Biscayne
1966 Caprice Drag Car Inwork
1966 Caprice parts car
2004 Silverado
2007 Impala LS
2009 G5


 
Steves32 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 10811

Reg: 12-22-99
03-18-08 06:33 AM - Post#1390859    
    In response to HAL_396

The fact that you can overtighten it & break the flare is good enough reason to steer away from aluminum.


 
jeffs55 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 11783
jeffs55
Age: 55
Loc: Shelby Forest, Tennessee
Reg: 01-05-06
03-18-08 06:57 AM - Post#1390876    
    In response to Steves32

And doesn't the FAA or whoever, require all hoses and lines be replaced every so often.
Jeff
55 Handyman
66 F100 project
32 3 Window Coupe project
1996 Silverado short bed extended cab
1948 Studebaker Champion
1977 Toyota Celica Coupe
My Pics


 
awsum55 
Senior Member
Posts: 8838
awsum55
Age: 62
Loc: O.P. Kansas
Reg: 09-27-01
03-18-08 07:02 AM - Post#1390879    
    In response to jeffs55

It's been on my car for 25 years so far.
Five things that you cannot recover in life:

* The Stone after it's thrown
* The Word after it's said
* An Occasion after it's missed
* The Time after it's gone
* A person after they die


 
Nick P 
"8th Year" Gold Supporting Member
Posts: 5936
Nick P
Age: 67
Loc: De Queen, Arkansas
Reg: 10-15-03
03-18-08 07:27 AM - Post#1390897    
    In response to HAL_396

  • HAL_396 Said:



They use it in aircraft all the time.



Yes we do but the aircraft ones shouldn't be compared to what jegs & summit sells. The aircraft ones are probably T-6 6061 heat treated while who knows what those guys sell. But I still think there stuff is good enough for automotive use or else I wouldn't use it.



Hmmmmm, Hal I am certainly expert on fittings, their composition or their construction, but I do know that the “Earl’s” brand, presently offered through Holley, meets all Mil-Specs required. AeroQuip, one of the older brands and copied by many, meets those same standards. There is no separation or lower grade of “AN” fittings. If the nomenclature “AN” is placed on the label, it has to meet or exceed the requirements for that designation.

If you will look at the “Summit” brand, they do not classify them as “AN” fitting, only that they adapt to the various “AN” sizes. I would be remiss at this point to also not state that the quality of the “Summit” brand for the application works quite well. If I were to attempt to fly my 55, then I would most likely revert back to the AeroQuip brand or begin raiding the Army Navy Surplus yards in the Dallas area as we did years ago.

Just my 2¢
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way it is. The way you cope with it, is what makes
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cnbell 
"11th Year" Silver Supporting Member
Posts: 8958
cnbell
Loc: So Cal
Reg: 04-14-04
03-18-08 09:35 AM - Post#1390991    
    In response to Nick P

I would stay with steel or use stainless steel if you are looking for high quality show level or are just a glutton for punishment...

As for rubber fuel line, products that are fuel rated, especially injected line which is reinforced, will give you years of trouble free use.
Craig

http://www.picturetrail.com/cnbell


 
57 Dreamer 
Contributor
Posts: 641
57 Dreamer
Age: 37
Loc: Houston (Westside), Texas
Reg: 05-25-06
03-18-08 09:47 AM - Post#1391006    
    In response to cnbell

I guess the real question is how do these Aluminum lines hold up to the crap gas we are getting nowadays. With the ethanol we are getting in the gas it would certainly make me want to steer towards something that is more corrosive resistant.

FWIW I got my lines in Stainless, from Harmon's (stock setup). There was only one bend in the line for shipping.
Stephen
"Born 20 years too late to have one Brand New" "See the USA in a Chevrolet"

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HAL_396 
Member
Posts: 2947
HAL_396
Loc: Austin, TX
Reg: 11-16-06
03-18-08 11:50 AM - Post#1391090    
    In response to Nick P

Nick, I agree about the fittings. I was refering to just the aluminum tubing itself. I also agree that it is hard to beat stainless steal, its just harder to work with.
1955 Chevy Custom
1966 Biscayne
1966 Caprice Drag Car Inwork
1966 Caprice parts car
2004 Silverado
2007 Impala LS
2009 G5


Edited by HAL_396 on 03-18-08 11:52 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
HAL_396 
Member
Posts: 2947
HAL_396
Loc: Austin, TX
Reg: 11-16-06
03-18-08 11:58 AM - Post#1391096    
    In response to Steves32

  • Steves32 Said:
The fact that you can overtighten it & break the flare is good enough reason to steer away from aluminum.



Isn't that true with any fittings? It's much easier to overtighten the aluminum but it's easier to work with also. I guess its a trade off just like everything else.

To be honest, when I bought my car it had copper tubing running from the tank forward.
1955 Chevy Custom
1966 Biscayne
1966 Caprice Drag Car Inwork
1966 Caprice parts car
2004 Silverado
2007 Impala LS
2009 G5


 
Steves32 
Ultra Senior Member
Posts: 10811

Reg: 12-22-99
03-18-08 04:20 PM - Post#1391322    
    In response to HAL_396

  • Quote:
Isn't that true with any fittings?


I'm not talking fittings- I'm talking about the aluminum flare.


 
nova7163 
Member
Posts: 153
nova7163
Loc: Orting, Wa
Reg: 03-03-02
03-18-08 08:31 PM - Post#1391578    
    In response to Steves32

In our helicopters we use both stainless steel and aluminum hydraulic lines. We have miles of hydraulic lines for 4 separate systems. All of the pressure sides of the systems are plumbed in steel and have between 2500-3500 psi running through them. On the other hand, all the return lines are aluminum and have between 60-90 psi fluid running through them.

You better go with SS or everyone on here is going to say you did it wrong. Just think, if your fuel pressure ever gets above 3000 psi you will be ok. You can use either of them and have no issues.

 
HAL_396 
Member
Posts: 2947
HAL_396
Loc: Austin, TX
Reg: 11-16-06
03-19-08 01:04 AM - Post#1391620    
    In response to nova7163

  • nova7163 Said:
You better go with SS or everyone on here is going to say you did it wrong. Just think, if your fuel pressure ever gets above 3000 psi you will be ok. You can use either of them and have no issues.



LMAO! Well said, and very true!
1955 Chevy Custom
1966 Biscayne
1966 Caprice Drag Car Inwork
1966 Caprice parts car
2004 Silverado
2007 Impala LS
2009 G5


 
Rick_L 
Honored Member
Posts: 25838

Loc: Katy, Tx, USA
Reg: 07-06-00
03-19-08 02:24 AM - Post#1391631    
    In response to HAL_396

If you use aluminum, you need to use single 37º flares and AN fittings. And you must clamp the aluminum line securely every foot or so to avoid motion due to vibration. You can't just shove a rubber hose and hose clamp over the end, and you can't leave 24" unsupported like you can (but shouldn't) with a steel line. If you don't do these things aluminum will fail.

Of course the same recommendation applies to steel and stainless steel, except with those you have the option of 45º double flare fittings as well as the AN 37º fittings. The difference is that you can "get away" with more on the steel.

 
dthela 
Forum Newbie
Posts: 69
dthela
Loc: R.I.
Reg: 01-19-08
03-25-08 03:12 PM - Post#1396512    
    In response to Rick_L

ebay has stainless lines listed in all lenghths and diameters..i found the doing a search for fuel lines...i bought 2 8' lenghths cheap!!!!!

 
swbatt 
West Coast Show Support
Posts: 3810
swbatt
Reg: 03-25-01
03-25-08 04:46 PM - Post#1396595    
    In response to Rick_L

I thought you were off lowering you car? haha



Junior

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